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Rose Bowl

This Rose Has Its Horns

Texas Wins With Field Goal On Final Play: Texas 38, Michigan 37

By David Neiman
Special to The Washington Post
Sunday, January 2, 2005; Page E01

PASADENA, Calif., Jan. 1 -- The sixth-ranked Texas Longhorns wanted to prove they belonged in the 91st Rose Bowl, and they did just that Saturday, defeating the 13th-ranked Michigan Wolverines, 38-37, in a spectacular contest that was decided on the final play.

Senior Dusty Mangum's 37-yard field goal as time expired was the winner, but everyone on the sidelines and in the crowd of 93,468 knew that Texas quarterback Vincent Young was the difference.


Dusty Mangum kicks the game-winning field goal over the fingertips of Michigan linebacker Prescott Burgess (No. 6) during the closing seconds. (Paul Sakuma -- AP)

No. 1 USC 55, No. 2 Oklahoma 19
 Matt Leinart
Southern Cal rockets past Oklahoma to ensure another national championship for Coach Pete Carroll and the Trojans.
Michael Wilbon: USC's Leinart (above, right) is ready for the next level.
Sooners' turnovers hamstring drive for title.
The BCS will be a hot topic yet again.

_____Audio_____
USC quarterback Matt Leinart talks about a total team effort.
USC running back LenDale White discusses the team's motivation.
USC Coach Pete Carroll had a good feeling going into the game.
Oklahoma Coach Bob Stoops credits the Trojans' preparation.

_____Bowl Results_____
 College Football
Look back at the outcomes of 28 bowl games crammed into three weeks of college football.



_____College Football Basics_____
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"Vincent played as well as any quarterback I've ever seen," Longhorns Coach Mack Brown said.

Young, the game's most valuable player, rushed for 192 yards and four touchdowns on 21 carries -- a Rose Bowl record for a quarterback. He also threw for 180 yards and a touchdown on 16 of 28 attempts.

"God gave me talent," Young said. "He blessed me with skills. . . . I like to make plays and stay ahead of the chains, and that's what I did tonight."

Young was not the only player setting records.

Wolverines quarterback Chad Henne, a true freshman, completed 18 of 34 passes for 227 yards and four touchdowns, tying the Rose Bowl record. And Michigan wide receiver Braylon Edwards, playing in his final collegiate game, made 10 catches for 109 yards and a Rose Bowl-record three touchdowns.

But the performance was little consolation for Edwards -- winner of the Biletnikoff Award, given to the nation's outstanding wide receiver.

"The records, they're a beautiful thing to have," he said. "But right now, all I can think about is this loss. . . . I gave everything I had. . . . Things don't always go as you'd like them to."

Michigan Coach Lloyd Carr echoed Edwards's frustration, particularly when it came to his team's inability to stop Young. The Wolverines surrendered 444 total yards, 372 of them to the Longhorns star's arm and legs.

"There were too many times we had him and should have gotten him to the ground," Carr said, "and we didn't."

Texas effectively ended any controversy surrounding its appearance in the game.

Despite being ranked fifth in the coaches' poll and sixth in the AP poll at season's end, the Longhorns had leapfrogged California -- ranked fourth in both polls -- in the Bowl Championship Series, becoming the No. 4 BCS team and earning a trip to the Rose Bowl.

In Thursday's Holiday Bowl, California lost, 45-31, to Texas Tech -- a team that Texas had beaten, 51-21, on Oct. 23.


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