washingtonpost.com  > Arts & Living > Theater > Features

The Language Of Dance, Making Itself Clear in Peru

By Clare Croft
Special to The Washington Post
Sunday, August 8, 2004; Page N01

./A46784-2004Aug6.txt010064400037510000032000000007171010503472500142250ustar00spudftpweb00001400350331Najaf Sees Worst Fighting Since 2003

Anemic Job Growth Adds to Economic Worries


Burgess's company (shown in "The Nightingale" last year) performed in Peru this summer. Below, the choreographer with dancer Tati Valle-Riestra. (Carol Pratt)

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AP Poll: Kerry Narrows Security Issue Gap

Terror Threat Info May Have Been Updated

AP: Arrests Damage al-Qaida Network

3rd-Generation Yalie Bush Opposes Legacies

'Moral Call' Led Soldier to Expose Abuse

Funk Singer Rick James Dies at Age 56

Deep-Sea Vessel Puts Ocean Floor in Reach

Matsui Powers Yanks Past Blue Jays 11-4

./A46792-2004Aug6.txt010064400037510000032000000043731010503526600142270ustar00spudftpweb00001400350331LOS ANGELES - The Philadelphia Phillies placed Kevin Millwood on the 15-day disabled list on Friday because of acute tendinitis in his pitching elbow.

Millwood lasted only 42 pitches Thursday night in San Diego before leaving after two innings with what then was described as inflammation in the elbow. His previous outing last Saturday was also shortened because of elbow stiffness.

The injury comes at a particularly bad time for the Phillies, who lost left fielder Pat Burrell to the DL on Thursday because of strained left wrist, and aren't getting right-handed starter Vicente Padilla off the DL until Tuesday.

Philadelphia also recalled reliever Geoff Geary from Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre on Friday.

The Phillies haven't had their opening day rotation intact since May 29. Seven of the 11 pitchers they began the season with have been on the DL, including closer Billy Wagner, who has been sidelined since July 22 because of a strained rotator cuff.

"People have been taking shots at us, but they don't know what we've been going through. But you can't worry about things you have no control over," said manager Larry Bowa, whose team had a one-game lead in the NL East at the All-Star break before losing 10 of their next 16 games.

Bowa had not decided before Friday night's game at Dodger Stadium who will take Millwood's spot in the rotation. Righty Paul Abbott, scheduled to make his final start in Padilla's absence on Saturday before returning to the bullpen, could remain in the rotation until Millwood returns.

Wagner went to Anaheim Angels team physician Dr. Lewis Yocum on Friday to get a second opinion on his shoulder. There was no structural damage, and Wagner was told to rest it for a week to 10 days before he picks up a ball again.

"He said that it didn't look like anything real serious. It looks like fatigue," Wagner said. "I'm not going to push it. I'd love to be back, but I'm going to try to get out from behind that 8-ball, get healthy and then hopefully I'll be ready to throw in September and be ready to contribute to this team."

Geary is back with the Phillies just three days after getting optioned back to Triple-A on Tuesday to make room on the roster for newly-acquired reliever Felix Rodriguez.

./A46796-2004Aug6.txt010064400037510000032000000007211010503551000142140ustar00spudftpweb00001400350331Najaf Sees Worst Fighting Since 2003

AP: Arrests Damage al-Qaida Network

Israel Reopens Gaza-Egypt Border Crossing

U.N. Blames Sudan for Civilian Atrocities

Mass Killings Reported in Ivory Coast

Prosecutors: Man Recruited Taliban on Web

Iranian Detainee Boycotts Military Hearing

Annan: U.N. Remains Target for Iraq Attack

Venezuelans March for Chavez Recall Vote

Media Abandoning German Language Reforms

./A46839-2004Aug6.txt010064400037510000032000000007171010504067500142270ustar00spudftpweb00001400350331Najaf Sees Worst Fighting Since 2003

Anemic Job Growth Adds to Economic Worries

AP Poll: Kerry Narrows Security Issue Gap

Terror Threat Info May Have Been Updated

AP: Arrests Damage al-Qaida Network

3rd-Generation Yalie Bush Opposes Legacies

'Moral Call' Led Soldier to Expose Abuse

Funk Singer Rick James Dies at Age 56

Deep-Sea Vessel Puts Ocean Floor in Reach

Matsui Powers Yanks Past Blue Jays 11-4

./A47162-2004Aug7.txt010064400037510000032000000007231010506121400142030ustar00spudftpweb00001400350331Najaf Fighting Worst Since Saddam's Fall

AP Poll: Kerry Narrows Security Issue Gap

Terror Threat Info May Have Been Updated

AP: Arrests Damage al-Qaida Network

Anemic Job Growth Adds to Economic Worries

3rd-Generation Yalie Bush Opposes Legacies

'Moral Call' Led Soldier to Expose Abuse

Funk Singer Rick James Dies at Age 56

Deep-Sea Vessel Puts Ocean Floor in Reach

Matsui Powers Yanks Past Blue Jays 11-4

./A46789-2004Aug6.txt010064400037510000032000000007061010503523000142200ustar00spudftpweb00001400350331Deep-Sea Vessel Puts Ocean Floor in Reach

Expedition to Probe Gulf of Mexico

Chorus Frog Found Croaking in Virginia

Cassini Spacecraft Sees Saturn Lightning

Firm Seeks Business of Cloning Pets

Poachers Putting Endangered Rhinos at Risk

Feds Accused of Exaggerating Fire Impact

Study Says Birds Feed Other Birds' Young

Canadian Team Joins Rocket Launch Contest

Pacific May Be Seeing New El Nino

./A46790-2004Aug6.txt010064400037510000032000000020201010503524200142020ustar00spudftpweb00001400350331MIAMI BEACH, Fla. - R. Kelly nearly swept the fourth annual Billboard-AURN R&B/Hip-Hop Awards, winning seven out of the eight categories in which he was a finalist Friday night.

Top honors also went to Beyonce and OutKast.

Kelly took home awards for top songwriter, producer, artist, singles artist, male artist, singles and singles airplay for "Step in the Name of Love." The only award for which he was nominated and did not win was top albums artist, which went to Southern hip-hop duo OutKast.

OutKast won three other awards - top artist duo or group, album and rap album, for "Speakerboxxx/The Love Below."

Beyonce was named both top female artist and new artist.

Billboard also honored legendary R&B/soul artist Isaac Hayes and socially conscious hip-hop artist KRS-One with its third annual Founders Awards, given to artists for their achievements and influence in the R&B and hip-hop genres.

The awards are determined by sales and radio airplay data that informs Billboard's weekly charts.

./A46791-2004Aug6.txt010064400037510000032000000006701010503525300142160ustar00spudftpweb00001400350331Funk Singer Rick James Dies at Age 56

R. Kelly Nearly Sweeps R&B/Hip-Hop Awards

Paris and Nicky Hilton's Home Burglarized

Actress Eartha Kitt Injured in Car Crash

Bill Clinton to Appear on 'Daily Show'

Tony Danza to Host Talk Show

New Chain Offers Dinner and a Movie

Latin Alternative Music Building Fans

Activist Sues 'Dr. Phil' Talk Show

Oprah Winfrey Adds 3 More Years to Show

./A50037-2004Aug8.txt010064400037510000032000000007161010546642400142150ustar00spudftpweb00001400350331Iraqi Prime Minister Appeals to Militants

Senior al-Qaida Operative Captured

Iran Diplomat Reportedly Kidnapped in Iraq

Experts: Beware al-Qaida's 'Offspring'

Two Bombs Kill Seven at Pakistani School

Arab League Chief Pledges Sudan Support

Sharon Moves Closer to Broadening Gov't

2 U.S. Soldiers, Afghan Killed in Blast

Migrant Journeys for Dominicans Dangerous

Flood-Swollen River Overflows India Dam

./A46903-2004Aug6.txt010064400037510000032000000031001010504315500142000ustar00spudftpweb00001400350331Given the amount of coverage your newspaper devoted to the Tour de France, it's remarkable how much pertinent information was missed, even at the race's end ["Armstrong Gets Historic Tour de France Victory," front page, July 26]. Yes, you reported who won each stage every day and who won the race for the overall best cyclist, otherwise known as the yellow jersey. Every detail of Lance Armstrong's performance was dutifully recorded. But if you asked an average Post reader who won the competitions for best sprinter and best climber, for instance, the question would be met with confusion.

The Tour de France has a number of competitions in addition to the contests for each day's stage and overall best cyclist. The best sprinter, "King of the Mountain," best team and best young rider are all important and deserve at least a sentence in any report. But who would have known from reading your newspaper that there was a decent competition for the green jersey (best sprinter), between Australian Robbie McEwen and Norwegian Thor Hushovd? Who would know that, with Frenchman Richard Virenque winning his seventh polka dot jersey (best climber), Armstrong would not be the only cyclist to make the record books this Tour?

It is true that the yellow jersey is the most important competition of the Tour de France. But why the silence on these other competitions? At least some of your readers are interested in knowing, and it takes nothing away from Armstrong's achievements.

-- Christopher Gould

Washington

./A49143-2004Aug8.txt010064400037510000032000000017021010532350500142070ustar00spudftpweb00001400350331Roadside Bomb Kills Two U.S. Soldiers, Afghan Interpreter in Afghanistan

Iraqi Prime Minister Announces Amnesty for Some in Insurgency, but Not for Terrorists

Terror Suspect Sent to New York in Early 2001 by Architect of Suicide Hijackings, U.S. Says

Bush Defends Elevated Terror Warnings, Says Alerts Provide 'Grim Reminder' of Threats

Lynndie England Hearing Recesses Without Ruling on Whether Administration Officials Must Testify

San Francisco Man Fakes Own Decapitation by Iraqi Militants in Video Shown on Arab Television

AP Enterprise: al-Qaida Bought Diamonds Ahead of Sept. 11 Attacks From Officials in Liberia

Kerry Says Bush Picked Ideology Over Science With His Restriction on Stem Cell Research

Autopsy Fails to Determine Cause of Death for Funk Legend Rick James, Who Died in His Sleep at 56

Greg Maddux Becomes 22nd Pitcher to Reach 300 Wins With 8-4 Win Over Giants Despite Shaky Start

./A47131-2004Aug7.txt010064400037510000032000000106411010505743500142110ustar00spudftpweb00001400350331KORHOGO, Ivory Coast - Dozens of boys and men suffocated in an airless, sweltering shipping container in which rebels locked more than 100 people for days, two survivors told The Associated Press, backing accounts of atrocities during factional fighting in Ivory Coast's rebel-held north.

With detainees packed in too tightly to move - or even breathe - one man, named Siaka, said he survived by gasping air through a small hole in the top of the container.

When the 40-foot-long by 9-foot-high container was opened, 75 bodies were pulled out, a second survivor, Amadou, told the AP on Friday.

"I thought I was going to die," said Amadou, a 25-year-old herdsman, speaking on condition he not be identified further. Surviving was "a miracle. It's due to God."

The accounts - along with others describing numerous missing men - support U.N. and Amnesty International findings on three newly discovered mass graves in rebel territory. The graves hold a total of 99 bodies, some of whom suffocated, the United Nations said Monday.

The U.N. Security Council called the killings a massacre.

"We were in difficult conditions: no water, no food, no air. Sometimes they pumped tear gas into the container," said Siaka, who also refused to allow his full name to be used for fear of reprisal.

The allegations represent the most serious charges of rights abuses lodged against Ivory Coast's rebels since they took control of the north in a nine-month civil war, which officially ended in July 2003.

The killings occurred during a flare-up of factional fighting in June, when the main rebel leader, Guillaume Soro, put down an uprising by followers of dissident Ibrahim Coulibaly. Soro's forces said just 22 people died in the uprising.

Rebel spokesman Alain Lobognon denied that the container was used to imprison people. He would not comment on the other allegations.

Rebels have controlled the north of cocoa-rich Ivory Coast - once one of West Africa's most stable and prosperous nations - since launching an unsuccessful coup attempt in September 2002.

The civil war that followed split the country between the mainly Muslim north and predominantly Christian and animist south.

Over the past year, troops and militias loyal to President Laurent Gbagbo have been accused of numerous abuses, including the killings of at least 120 people during and after an attempted March opposition rally in the commercial capital, Abidjan.

However, survivors and others now accuse the chief rebel movement of killing dozens of prisoners, many of them civilians, during and after the June uprising.

Amnesty International said it believes some of the 99 mass grave victims had their hands tied behind their backs before being beheaded, while others suffocated in shipping containers.

Korhogo residents said the yellow metal shipping container that once stood at the entrance of the town's rebel-held army base was regularly used as a prison by rebel commander Fofie Kouakou.

Siaka and Amadou said they were confined in the container before Coulibaly's uprising began June 20. They were locked up by Kouakou's men on unrelated complaints - Siaka in a violent family dispute, and Amadou in an alleged motorcycle theft. Fewer than 30 others initially were in the container with them, they said.

But after fighting broke out, more than 100 more men were quickly locked inside.

"We were 125 in there, and it became extremely hot," Amadou said. "We were hot and hungry. Some of us began collapsing in the container."

Rebel leaders opened the container two days later - at 3 a.m. on June 22, Amadou said. By that time, it was filled with dead. Kouakou's people immediately put inmates to work removing the corpses, Amadou and Siaka said.

"We took the dead and put them in a truck, and we counted 75 bodies," Amadou said, adding that one of his relatives was among the dead.

"When we finished counting the corpses, (Kouakou's men) took three of us to go with them and the bodies," Amadou said. "These three never came back."

Another Korhogo resident, Inza Kone, said nine members of his family - including a boy of 14 - disappeared after being arrested during fighting.

Two weeks later, local elders held a meeting with rebels to find out whether the youths were alive.

"They officially informed them that they were dead, but they didn't give us back the bodies," said Kone. "We are powerless."

ss graves in rebel territory. The graves hold a total of 99 bodies, some of whom suffocated, th./A46897-2004Aug6.txt010064400037510000032000000045461010504315500142330ustar00spudftpweb00001400350331CHICAGO - C.C. Sabathia outpitched Mark Buehrle in a matchup of top left-handers, and Coco Crisp hit a three-run homer to lead the Cleveland Indians past the slumping Chicago White Sox 3-2 Friday night.

Pinch-runner Willie Harris was thrown out at the plate by second baseman Ronnie Belliard to end the game.

The Indians' 10th win in 15 games moved them within percentage points of overtaking the White Sox for second place in the AL Central. Chicago has lost 10 of 12.

Sabathia (8-6) shut out the White Sox for five innings before Chicago pushed across an unearned run in the sixth and Juan Uribe homered with two outs in the seventh to make it a one-run game.

Sabathia gave up five hits with one walk and eight strikeouts in seven innings. Bob Howry pitched a scoreless eighth, and Bob Wickman worked the ninth for his third save.

Harris was on second with two outs in the ninth when Joe Borchard hit an infield singled that deflected off Wickman's glove. Harris tried to score, but Belliard picked up the ball and threw him out.

Buehrle (10-5) pitched a two-hit shutout against Cleveland on July 21, facing the minimum 27 batters after his bid for a perfect game was broken up in the seventh. But he is winless in three subsequent starts.

Casey Blake and Travis Hafner singled in the second inning and, one out later, Crisp lifted his eighth homer to left.

Jamie Burke, who doubled with two outs in the third for Chicago's first hit, singled in the sixth and moved up on a sacrifice and a passed ball before scoring on Roberto Alomar's sacrifice fly.

Alomar, rejoining the White Sox after he was traded Thursday by Arizona, went 0-for-3 and made a nice relay throw to get Ronnie Belliard at the plate in the fifth when he tried to score on Matt Lawton's double to center.

Alomar also made an error on Omar Vizquel's grounder to second in the seventh.

Buehrle lasted 6 2-3 innings, allowing nine hits and three runs. He walked one and struck out five.

Notes:@ The last time the teams met, two weeks ago at Jacobs Field, the White Sox posted 14-0 and 3-0 shutouts. ... The Indians traded for Toronto 1B-DH Josh Phelps, and he will join the team Sunday and play mostly against left-handed pitching. Minor league infielder Eric Crozier was sent to the Blue Jays. ... Sabathia improved to 7-2 in his career against the White Sox.

./A46793-2004Aug6.txt010064400037510000032000000024261010503527700142270ustar00spudftpweb00001400350331ab r h bi ISuzuki rf 4 0 0 0 Bloomquist cf 5 0 0 0 BBoone 2b 5 0 1 0 Ibanez lf 4 0 0 0 EMartinez dh 3 0 1 0 Spiezio 1b 4 0 0 0 DWilson c 1 1 0 0 Winn cf 1 0 0 0 Leone 3b 3 0 0 0 Olivo c 0 0 0 0 Lopez ss 4 0 0 0 Totals 34 1 2 0 TAMPA BAY ab r h bi Crawford lf 4 1 3 0 Lugo ss 4 0 0 0 Huff 3b 3 0 0 0 Baldelli cf 4 1 2 0 TMartinez dh 4 0 2 1 JoCruz rf 2 0 1 1 Fick 1b 4 0 0 0 THall c 0 0 0 0 RSanchez 2b 3 0 1 0 Fordyce c 3 0 0 0 Blum 3b 1 0 0 0 Totals 32 2 9 2 Seattle 010 000 000 0_1 Tampa Bay 000 100 000 1_2 Two outs when winning run scored. E_Huff (11), Fordyce (3). DP_Seattle 2. LOB_Seattle 8, Tampa Bay 10. 2B_RSanchez (12). SB_Crawford (46). CS_Crawford (13). S_Lugo. SF_TMartinez, JoCruz. IP H R ER BB SO Seattl RFrankli 7 7 1 1 3 1 Sherril 1 2-3 1 0 0 0 2 Nageotte L,1- 1 1 1 1 2 0 Tampa Ba Brazelto 8 2 1 0 4 3 Harper W,4- 2 0 0 0 0 2 IBB_off Brazelton (ISuzuki) 1. HBP_by Brazelton (DWilson). WP_Sherrill. Umpires_Home, Troy FullwoodFirst, Mike DiMuroSecond, Joe WestThird, Paul Emmel. T_2:45. A_10,452 (43,969).

./A46794-2004Aug6.txt010064400037510000032000000070241010503531200142150ustar00spudftpweb00001400350331DOVER TOWNSHIP, N.J. - The bioterrorism expert whose homes were raided by FBI agents investigating the anthrax attacks had sought a patent for a system to identify chemical and biological strikes in September 2001.

Dr. Kenneth M. Berry filed a provisional patent for the system in October 2000 and filed the actual patent application Sept. 28, 2001, 10 days after the first anthrax letters were postmarked. He touted the system as an effective way to respond to bioterrorism attacks.

"In an era where chemical, biological or nuclear attacks at one or more locations either globally or within a country are possible, it is desirable to have a surveillance system capable of locating and identifying the type of attack so that a rapid response can be initiated," according to a description of the invention.

Berry has not been connected to the attacks, and he told police that he had nothing to do with anthrax, Point Pleasant Beach Police Chief Daniel DePolo said in a news conference Friday.

"He just denied he was guilty of anything," DePolo said.

On Thursday, more than three dozen agents, some in protective suits, combed through two homes listed in property records as Berry's past and present addresses in Wellsville, N.Y., a bucolic village of 5,000 residents near the Pennsylvania line.

About 250 miles southeast, the Jersey shore home of Berry's parents was also searched, and neighbors said investigators brought out bulky garbage bags and towed away two vehicles, later returning one. There was no sign of further police activity there Friday.

The FBI said the public was not in immediate danger, but declined to say what agents were seeking.

The searches came nearly three years after five people were killed and 17 fell ill when anthrax-laced envelopes were mailed to government offices and news media, triggering even more fear in a country already shaken by Sept. 11. The anthrax investigation has baffled the government and turned up few leads.

Hours after Thursday's raids, Berry, 46, was charged with assault for allegedly fighting with four family members at a seaside motel in New Jersey, authorities said. The family members required treatment at medical facilities.

"Apparently, there was a dispute over a cell phone, and it's my understanding that there was a lot of stress from search warrants that were being conducted," DePolo said.

In 1997, Berry founded an organization that trains medical professionals to respond to chemical and biological attacks. The bioterrorism-response system uses a computer to combine weather data with information on how various concentrations of biological or chemical agents would affect a specific location, according to the patent office filing. The patent was granted in March.

A New Jersey native, Berry was director of emergency services at Jones Memorial Hospital in Wellsville until 2001. He resigned after pleading guilty to disorderly conduct to settle charges of forgery. He was also once charged with forgery in a fake-will case, but pleaded to a lesser violation and was allowed to keep his medical license.

Berry's father said he is being "shafted by the FBI" because the government has been unable to find whoever is behind the deadly mailings.

"It's just buying time because they have nothing on anthrax," William Berry told The Star-Ledger of Newark from his home in Newtown, Conn. "You are looking at a setup."

---

Associated Press writers Ben Dobbin in Wellsville, N.Y., and Krista Larson in Trenton contributed to this report.

.J. - The bioterrorism expert whose homes were raided by FBI agents investigating the anthrax attacks had sought a patent for a system to identify chemical and biological strikes in September 2001.

Dr. Kenneth M. Berry filed a provisional patent for the system in October 2000 and filed the actual patent application Sept. 28, 2001, 10 days after the first anthrax letters were postmarked. He touted the system as an effective way to respond to bioterrorism attacks.

"In an era wh./A47236-2004Aug7.txt010064400037510000032000000150771010507007000142150ustar00spudftpweb00001400350331NAJAF, Iraq - U.S. helicopter gunships and fighter jets pounded Shiite Muslim insurgents hiding in a sprawling cemetery Friday in the most intense fighting in this holy city since the fall of Saddam Hussein. The U.S. military said 300 militants were killed in the past two days.

The clashes between coalition forces and militant Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr's Mahdi Army flared in Shiite communities across the country, killing dozens of other Iraqis, according to Iraqi officials and the militants.

The fighting, which began early Thursday, threatened to reignite the bloody, two-month Shiite insurrection that broke out in April - and the heavy U.S. response appeared designed to quash militia activity quickly and prevent a repeat.

Al-Sadr on Friday blamed all the violence in Iraq on the United States, which he called "our enemy and the enemy of the people," in a sermon read on his behalf at the Kufa Mosque near Najaf.

A renewed Shiite uprising would cause severe problems for Iraq's fledgling interim government as it tries to gain popular support and for coalition forces that are already struggling against Sunni militants.

The heavy battles came as the most powerful Shiite cleric in Iraq, Grand Ayatollah Ali Husseini al-Sistani, arrived in Britain to receive medical treatment for what an aide called "a health crisis" involving his heart.

The 73-year-old ayatollah, who holds enormous influence among Iraq's Shiite majority, has played a largely moderating role, urging Shiites not to resort to anti-U.S. violence, and during al-Sadr's first uprising he played a role in trying to calm the crisis.

There was no information on the seriousness of al-Sistani's condition, but the trip was his first time out of Iraq in years. The aide, Sheik Hamed Khafaf, said al-Sistani "needs special treatment, but he is not in a deteriorated state."

Al-Sadr aides called for a return to the truces that have kept relative calm for the past two months, and other Shiite leaders were trying to restore a cease-fire.

The Iraqi government said it was determined to crush all militias in the country, including the Mahdi Army, and Najaf Gov. Adnan al-Zurufi gave the insurgents 24 hours to leave the city.

The Mahdi Army has proved difficult to put down in the past. It persisted despite heavy casualties during its first uprising, and U.S. commanders - hesitant to carry out a full-fledged assault in the holiest Shiite city - were forced to back down from vows to uproot the militia.

Intense fighting before dawn Friday hit Baghdad's Shiite neighborhood of Sadr City, where 20 people were killed and 114 wounded during two days of fighting, the Health Ministry said. Separate attacks blamed on al-Sadr's followers wounded 15 American soldiers in Baghdad, the U.S. military said.

The Najaf fighting dwarfed the clashes seen in the spring, residents said. Two U.S. Marines and an American soldier were killed in Najaf on Thursday, and 12 troops were wounded, the military said. The two days of fighting in Najaf also killed at least 13 civilians and wounded 58 others, according to hospital officials.

Gunfire and explosions rocked the city Friday as helicopters flew overhead. The streets were nearly deserted, shops were closed, and some residents near the cemetery fled with their belongings on carts. A dead woman lay abandoned on an empty sidewalk, Associated Press Television News footage showed.

Fire tore through a nearby outdoor market and smoke rose from several parts of the city.

U.S. Marines chased the militants into the massive cemetery, which the militants had been using as a base, military officials said. Helicopter gunships slammed insurgent positions in the cemetery, and Marines were sent in to root out militiamen, the military said.

The insurgents have taken advantage of the cemetery's location in the so-called Exclusion Zone - where U.S. forces were forbidden under the truces - to use as a base for attacks and a weapons storage site, said Lt. Col. Gary Johnston, operations officer for the 11th Marine Expeditionary Unit.

After the militiamen attacked a police station from the cemetery early Thursday, the U.S. military retaliated, he said.

U.S. Col. Anthony Haslam, chief of operations in Najaf, said 300 militants out of a total force of about 2,000 had been killed in Najaf since Thursday.

There was no independent confirmation of that number, which would be among the largest militant death tolls in a single engagement since the end of the war last year. The militiamen, who have their own clinics, rarely take their dead or wounded to city hospitals.

Ahmed al-Shaibany, an al-Sadr aide in Najaf, said only nine militants were killed and 20 injured in the city.

Al-Zurufi, the Najaf governor, estimated 400 militants were killed and 1,000 arrested. He also said 80 of the fighters at the cemetery were Iranian. "There is Iranian support to al-Sadr's group and this is no secret," he said.

Guerrillas attacked a convoy of U.S. Humvees at dawn in the city of Samarra, 60 miles north of the capital, witnesses said, and U.S. helicopters responded with rockets at insurgent positions. At least two people were killed and 16 injured during the fighting, said Ahmed Jadou'a, an official at Samarra Hospital. Two houses were also destroyed.

In southern Iraq, British troops backed by tanks fought with al-Sadr militiamen who seized four police stations on the outskirts of Amarah. The troops secured the main police station, said Maj. Ian Clooney, a British military spokesman. It was not clear if they recaptured the others.

In Nasiriyah, assailants attacked Italian troops early Friday with automatic weapons and targeted a police station, an Italian military spokesman said. Eight Iraqis, including five militants, were killed, and 13 were wounded, according to Abdul Khuder al-Tahir, a senior Interior Ministry official. There were no coalition casualties, the Italian spokesman said.

Insurgents also attacked a Romanian patrol outside Nasiriyah with gunfire and rocket-propelled grenades, said Gelaledin Nezir, the Romanian Defense Ministry spokesman. No injuries were reported.

Assailants also attacked a police station and City Hall in the southern city of Basra, wounding three police and five civilians, police and hospital officials said.

Violence in Basra since Thursday killed five al-Sadr fighters, said As'ad al-Basri, an al-Sadr official in the city.

Also Friday, Lebanon's state-run National News Agency said four Lebanese truck drivers had been taken hostage in Iraq as they drove from Baghdad to Ramadi.

./A46904-2004Aug6.txt010064400037510000032000000020751010504315600142140ustar00spudftpweb00001400350331 Robert Novak described Bill Frist's Senate as being in disarray [op-ed, July 19] after the majority leader failed to round up the votes to pass the GOP-backed constitutional amendment banning gay marriage.

Novak discussed how things have not gone swimmingly for the "rich and handsome" leader from Tennessee and said that former majority leader Trent Lott (R-Miss.) was brought down by "Democratic viciousness and [President] Bush's nonsupport." I beg to differ.

Lott was brought down by the racism and insinuation in his remarks that this country would have been better off had we voted for then-Gov. Strom Thurmond of South Carolina in the 1948 presidential election. Aside from opposing an anti-lynching law and being a strong segregationist, Thurmond was an ardent xenophobe and despised diversity and civil rights expansion.

Is it any wonder that for so many Americans of color, the Republican Party offers no home? Sorry Novak missed the importance of Lott's remarks.

-- Jeremy Marks

Rockville

./A49132-2004Aug7.txt010064400037510000032000000037041010532157300142130ustar00spudftpweb00001400350331DELTONA, Fla. - Police investigating the slayings of six people whose bodies were found in a blood-spattered Florida house questioned two men Saturday.

Investigators described the two men as "persons of interest" but not suspects in the deaths of four men and two women whose remains were found in different rooms of a three-bedroom home in Deltona, about 25 miles north of Orlando.

Sheriff Ben Johnson said one man being held on a probation violation "had some knowledge of some of the victims." The other man agreed to accompany detectives. The sheriff described the two as "somewhat" cooperative.

Authorities have not offered a motive or disclosed how the victims died, although the sheriff said the crime scene was "very, very brutal."

The victims ranged in age from 18 to mid-30s and did not appear to be related.

The bodies were discovered after one victim's co-worker at Burger King called a friend and asked the person to visit the home because the victim had not arrived for work, officials said.

The sheriff's office on Saturday identified the victims as Michelle Ann Nathan, 19; Anthony Vega, 34; Roberto "Tito" Gonzalez, 28, of New York; Francisco Ayo Roman, 30; and Jonathan Gleason, 18. Authorities had not yet positively identified the sixth victim by late Saturday.

Forensic experts also began to examine blood stains at the house. There was so much blood to analyze that the task could take up to 18 hours, sheriff's spokesman Brandon Haught said.

The killing spree in the working-class, bedroom community of more than 70,000 people was the deadliest in Florida since 1990, when a man whose car was repossessed shot eight people to death at a Jacksonville loan office before turning the gun on himself.

Outside the house, rain thinned the numbers of neighbors and relatives who had gathered a day earlier. Beside a bouquet of white roses, one person left a note that read: "There really are monsters among us."

./A44837-2004Aug6.txt010064400037510000032000000121601010467327000142200ustar00spudftpweb00001400350331 By Khaled Farhan

NAJAF, Iraq (Reuters) - U.S. forces backed by helicopter gunships battled militia loyal to rebel cleric Moqtada al-Sadr in the holy city of Najaf on Friday, fueling fears of a second Shi'ite uprising.

British and Italian troops were attacked by members of Sadr's militia, known as the Mehdi Army, across Shi'ite- dominated southern Iraq -- in Basra, Amara and Nassiriya -- and fighting raged in Sadr City, a Shi'ite district of Baghdad.

The Health Ministry said fighting in Sadr City alone had killed 19 Iraqis and wounded 111 since early on Thursday, while in Nassiriya six were dead and 13 wounded. In Najaf, the toll was given as one dead and 25 wounded.

The flare-up of tension with radical members of Iraq's majority community, less than three months after Shi'ite militants last rose up across the south, is a severe headache for Iraqi Prime Minister Iyad Allawi's fledgling government.

In the previous uprising, in April and May, hundreds of Iraqis and dozens of U.S. troops were killed.

Yet Sadr, a young cleric with an ardent following among poor, disaffected youths, appeared keen to stop the fighting. Via a spokesman in Baghdad, he called for a resumption of a truce struck in June to end the previous bout of unrest.

"We have no objections to entering negotiations to solve this crisis," Sadr's spokesman in Baghdad, Mahmoud al-Sudani, told reporters. "As I have said in the name of Sayed Sadr, we want a resumption of the truce."

While Sadr may be popular with frustrated young Shi'ites, many of Iraq's mainstream community follow Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani, the most influential Shi'ite cleric in Iraq who has carefully and quietly tried to keep a lid on Sadr's agitating.

In a worrying move for his followers, Sistani, a 73-year-old Iranian-born cleric, left Iraq on Friday, traveling to London via Lebanon for treatment for a heart problem, sources said.

BREWING TENSION

Tension has been rising in Najaf for several days, since Iraqi security forces surrounded Sadr's house in the city, and fighting there on Thursday was the fiercest since the uprising in April and May, when scores were killed.

On Thursday, militiamen shot down a U.S. helicopter as it was trying to evacuate a wounded soldier. No one was killed, but the pilots were wounded. The U.S. military estimated that as many as 20 militiamen were killed in the day's fighting.

Early on Friday F-16s, AC-130 gunships and helicopters patrolled the skies over Najaf, covering U.S. troops battling insurgents in and around Najaf's cemetery, the largest in the Arab world and a safe haven for militants.

On a street leading from Najaf to the nearby town of Kufa, where Sadr often preaches on Fridays, U.S. tanks fired on hotels suspected of being used by militiamen to snipe at U.S. forces, witnesses said.

Fighting also flared near Najaf's shrines, some of the holiest in Shi'ite Islam, and some alleged that gunfire had damaged the dome of the Imam Ali shrine. Most Iraqi Shi'ites react with outrage when clashes erupt near the sacred sites.

SAMARRA BOILS

As well as trying to control the Shi'ite threat, Allawi is struggling to contain Iraq's 15-month Sunni-led insurgency.

As part of that effort, the U.S. military launched operation Cajun Mousetrap around the city of Samarra, 100 km (60 miles) north of Baghdad, where guerrillas have carried out a series of bomb attacks in recent weeks.

At least three suspected insurgents were killed in overnight fighting near the town, said Major Neal O'Brien, a spokesman for U.S. forces in the area, and nine suspects were detained.

Last month, a U.S. general said he feared Samarra could become like Falluja, the rebellious city west of Baghdad, if the brewing insurgency there were not quickly tamped down.

Besides Najaf, the Mehdi Army showed its militancy in Nassiriya, 375 km (235 miles) south of Baghdad, firing assault rifles, rocket-propelled grenades and mortars at Italian troops.

A spokesman for Italy's 2,700-strong force in Iraq said there were more than a dozen attacks on patrols overnight, while a barracks for Iraqi security forces was also attacked and a power plant was bombarded by mortars.

CAPITAL TENSE

In Baghdad, the U.S. military said 16 soldiers were wounded in four attacks on Thursday in Sadr City and were trying to restore order in the area, from where Sadr draws much of his support among poor, disaffected Shi'ite youths.

Colonel Robert Abrams, commander of the 1st Brigade of the 1st Cavalry Division, responsible for Sadr City, said his troops were showing restraint in the face of the onslaught, which he said included children as young as six throwing firebombs.

The U.S. military's chief partner in Iraq, Britain, also came under attack when militiamen fired a mortar at a garrison in the southern city of Basra, wounding one soldier.

Basra has largely been calm since the overthrow of Saddam Hussein last year, but Sadr has a large following in the city and his followers have led occasional outbreaks of violence. (Additional reporting by Michael Georgy)

./A46436-2004Aug6.txt010064400037510000032000000007241010500767700142230ustar00spudftpweb00001400350331Iranian Detainee Boycotts Military Hearing

Terror Threat Info May Have Been Updated

'Moral Call' Led Soldier to Expose Abuse

Judge Lifts Letourneau No-Contact Order

U.S. Accuses Briton of Taliban Recruiting

Hacking Ran Therapy Sessions on Psych Ward

Six Found Slain in Central Fla. Home

Funk Singer Rick James Dies at Age 56

Suit Filed Over Towel Left in Woman's Body

ABA May Bar Judges From Anti-Gay Groups

./A46905-2004Aug6.txt010064400037510000032000000013601010504316000142040ustar00spudftpweb00001400350331 One wonders at Richard Cohen's motivation in writing such a commentary [op-ed, July 15] on stem cell research and Ron Reagan. Cohen's thoughts on such research became buried in his attack on Reagan. Cohen says that if Reagan were not the son of a beloved president, no one would pay any attention to him. So what? Exaggerated attention is paid to most children of presidents, and this does not always work in their favor.

The case for stem cell research is significant, and the movement needs a spokesman. If the Democratic National Convention had put on a noted research scientist, I'm sure millions of people would have reached for their remotes.

-- James W. Norris

Winchester

./A46795-2004Aug6.txt010064400037510000032000000050111010503532400142130ustar00spudftpweb00001400350331PHOENIX - A federal appeals panel on Friday upheld a lower court's decision to stop cameras from transmitting live video of Maricopa County Jail inmates to the Internet.

One of the judges from the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals said the practice "constitutes a level of humiliation that almost anyone would regard as profoundly undesirable."

The ruling came on an appeal by Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio, who challenged a U.S. District Court judge's decision to stop the cameras.

Judge Earl Carroll's preliminary injunction in March 2003 prohibited the video feed until resolution of a lawsuit alleging the cameras violate 14th Amendment guarantees of due process and equal protection.

Twenty-four former inmates at Phoenix's Madison Street Jail - which exclusively holds people awaiting trial - filed the lawsuit in May 2001 against Arpaio and Maricopa County, which includes the Phoenix area.

The inmates said the use of the jail cameras amounted to unconstitutional punishment of people who had not been convicted of a crime.

Arpaio has gained notoriety for putting inmates on chain gangs and issuing them striped uniforms and pink underwear.

Arpaio spokesman Jack MacIntyre said the court's decision "doesn't change anything." He said Arpaio is deciding if he wants to appeal.

James Hamm, program director for Middle Ground Prison Reform, the group that filed the inmates' lawsuit, said the ruling affirms all that the plaintiffs alleged.

"What happened to these people was that they were being displayed the same way zoo animals are," Hamm said.

Three cameras fed live video of a men's holding cell, a booking area and an incoming inmate patdown area on the sheriff's Web site, and later, a crime Web site.

Judges Richard Paez and Marsha Berzon affirmed the lower court's decision.

"Exposure to millions of complete strangers, not to mention friends, loved ones, co-workers and employers, as one is booked, fingerprinted, and generally processed as an arrestee, and as one sits, stands or lies in a holding cell, constitutes a level of humiliation that almost anyone would regard as profoundly undesirable and strive to avoid," Paez wrote.

Judge Carlos Bea disagreed, saying the Web cams deterred crime and offered the public governmental transparency.

---

On the Net:

9th Circuit Court:http://www.ce9.uscourts.gov/

Maricopa County Sheriff's Department:http://www.mcso.org/

Middle Ground Prison Reform:http://www.middlegroundprisonreform.org

./A46815-2004Aug6.txt010064400037510000032000000007001010503663400142110ustar00spudftpweb00001400350331Matsui Powers Yanks Past Blue Jays 11-4

Colangelo Out As CEO of Diamondbacks

Rockies Trade Larry Walker to Cardinals

AP: Baseball to Vote on Selig Extension

Bulls Struggling Six Years After Jordan

U.S. Dominates Serbia-Montenegro 78-60

Lakers Trade Payton, Fox to Celtics

Vick Says No Need to Fuss About Injuries

Texas Heisman Hopeful Gets Jail Time

Capriati Upset in Rogers Cup Quarters

./A46797-2004Aug6.txt010064400037510000032000000014231010503552200142200ustar00spudftpweb00001400350331The 2004 Billboard R&B-Hip-Hop Award winners, announced in Miami Beach on Friday:

Album: "Speakerboxxx/The Love Below," OutKast

Single: "Step In The Name of Love," R. Kelly

Artist: R. Kelly

Male Artist: R. Kelly

Female Artist: Beyonce

Duo or Group: OutKast

New Artist: Beyonce

Singles Artist: R. Kelly

Albums Artist: OutKast

Rap Album: "Speakerboxxx/The Love Below," OutKast

Singles Sales: "Superstar/Flying Without Wings," Ruben Studdard

Singles Airplay: "Step In The Name Of Love," R. Kelly

Hot Rap Tracks: "Get Low," Lil Jon & The East Side Boyz, featuring Ying Yang Twins

Songwriter: R. Kelly

Producer: R. Kelly

Major Label: Island Def Jam Music Group

Independent Label: TVT

./A47080-2004Aug6.txt010064400037510000032000000040051010505127100142000ustar00spudftpweb00001400350331LAS VEGAS - Four teens described as members of an affluent gang that terrorized a neighborhood last summer were sentenced Friday to a year each in county jail.

The alleged members of the "311 Boyz" gang, who drew national attention after videos surfaced of the youths beating each other, had pleaded no contest to one count each of battery with a deadly weapon, which carries a maximum 15-year prison sentence.

Prosecutors agreed to drop more serious charges, including attempted murder, for the teens' alleged role in a rock attack that maimed another Las Vegas teenager last summer.

"Each boy has the opportunity to write his own history now," Deputy District Attorney Christopher Laurent said outside court.

Those sentenced Friday were Christopher Farley, 19; Jeff Hart, 18; Matthew Costello, 18; and Steven Gazley, 19.

Nine teens originally were charged in the rock attack. One was acquitted, and charges against a second were dismissed. Three others also entered the equivalent of no contest pleas and received probation but no jail time.

The judge suspended prison sentences for the four teens, opting for jail time and three to five years of probation, including a year of house arrest.

Moments before sentencing, the victim in the rock attack - 18-year-old Stephen "Tanner" Hansen - urged the judge to impose the maximum prison sentence.

"I would like a second chance, and I'm not going to get it," said Hansen, who needs more reconstructive surgery for facial injuries. "I'm stuck with the physical and emotional pain for the rest of my life."

Lawyers for the four had urged the judge to grant probation, saying they had not been in trouble before last summer.

The defendants briefly addressed the judge and apologized to Hansen and his family. Their lawyers took issue with the prosecution's claim that the teens were members of the "311 Boyz" gang.

Outside court, Hansen's lawyer said the family was relieved, but also was considering a civil lawsuit against the teens.

./A46907-2004Aug6.txt010064400037510000032000000017521010504316300142160ustar00spudftpweb00001400350331What did Ken Jennings do to The Post? Here is a young man who has accomplished a remarkable feat on "Jeopardy!" and you treat him as some kind of freak of nature ["An Answering Machine on Hold; 'Jeopardy!' Juggernaut Ken Jennings Goes Home for the Summer With His Record Streak Intact," front page, July 24]. He is a "geekathon" who answers esoteric trivia in your writer's estimation. What negative attributes did she miss in her mean-spirited piece?

In the same edition of your paper, two profiles of self-admitted troubled souls were positively gushing with positive statements. Both Mike Tyson and Rodney Dangerfield were practically crowned with approval for their drug-related and violence-prone lifestyles. But Jennings appeared lacking in any redeeming quality, except one. The writer said Jennings was a religious conservative and a family man. Ahh, could this have been the source of your dislike?

-- Jim Slicer

Washington

./A46908-2004Aug6.txt010064400037510000032000000004711010507770000142200ustar00spudftpweb00001400350331 HORSE RACING

Thoroughbreds at Pimlico, 1:10

Harness racing at Rosecroft, 7:20

MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL

Texas at Baltimore, 4:35

MINOR LEAGUE BASEBALL

Akron at Bowie, 7:05

Wilmington at Potomac, 7:05

./A46798-2004Aug6.txt010064400037510000032000000030071010503553400142240ustar00spudftpweb00001400350331CARACAS, Venezuela - Thousands of government opponents joined a candlelight march through Venezuela's capital Friday in support of a recall vote against President Hugo Chavez.

Waving Venezuelan flags and chanting "this government will fall," the demonstrators danced to anti-Chavez jingles, held candles and blew whistles.

"Chavez isn't capable of being president, and he's demonstrated that to us," said 56-year-old psychologist Nelson Mora, one of an estimated 5,000 in the march. "Unemployment and poverty have increased."

Venezuela will vote Aug. 15 on whether Chavez, a leftist former paratrooper, must step down or remain in office.

Chavez was elected in 1998 and re-elected in 2000 on promises to stamp out corruption and improve living condition for the poor. Opponents argue Chavez is imposing an authoritarian regime and mismanaging the economy.

Separately, Chavez said Friday that he hopes for better relations with the United States after the U.S. presidential elections in November. Ties have soured over what Chavez believes was initial U.S. endorsement of a 2002 coup attempt that ultimately failed.

Chavez said if President Bush is re-elected, "we hope that he receives good advice because we don't understand how a country like that, a strategic ally, a strategic partner, has been pressured" to criticize Venezuela, a top U.S. oil supplier.

If challenger John Kerry wins, Chavez said, "We hope for a new era of relations that are frank, sincere, affectionate and cooperative."

./A46909-2004Aug6.txt010064400037510000032000000071411010507770000142220ustar00spudftpweb00001400350331 Texas senior running back Cedric Benson was sentenced to eight days in jail after pleading no contest yesterday to misdemeanor criminal trespassing for forcing his way into an apartment in 2003.

But due to crowding at the jail and credit for good behavior, he likely will only spend a fraction of that time -- if any -- behind bars.

"We don't have beds available," said Travis (Tex.) County sheriff's spokesman Roger Wade.

Police said Benson forced his way into an apartment last October to search for a stolen television.

The charge was a Class A misdemeanor punishable by up to a year in jail. Travis County Judge Elizabeth Earle also ordered Benson to pay a $1,000 fine and up to $600 in restitution for the apartment's damaged door and court costs, said Benson's attorney, Brian Carney.

Benson, who was allowed to serve his jail time on weekends, will be with the Longhorns when the team reports to training camp on Monday.

A likely Heisman Trophy contender this season, Benson has been one of the most prolific ball carriers in Texas history with 3,706 yards rushing and 45 touchdowns.

TENNIS: Jennifer Capriati, playing for the first time in more than a month, lost to unseeded Russian Elena Likhovtseva, 6-2, 7-5, in the quarterfinals of the Rogers Cup in Montreal.

Amelie Mauresmo of France also advanced to the semifinals with a 3-6, 6-2, 6-4 victory over Karolina Sprem of Croatia. . . .

Andre Agassi won a nerve-testing first-set tiebreaker, then closed out a 7-6 (14-12), 6-3 victory over fourth-seeded Carlos Moya that sent him to his first tournament semifinal in five months.

Agassi will play No. 2 Andy Roddick in the semifinals of the $2.5 million Cincinnati Masters in Mason, Ohio. Lleyton Hewitt will face Tommy Robredo in the other semifinal.

COLLEGE BASKETBALL: Maryland point guard John Gilchrist, who led the Terrapins in scoring, assists and steals as a sophomore, is one of 50 players named to the preseason watch list for the Wooden Award. Gilchrist, who will be a junior this fall, is one of 12 ACC players on the list, the most of any league.

HORSE RACING: Jerry Bailey became the leading rider in Saratoga Race Course history with his second victory of the day, aboard Taittinger Rose, in Saratoga Springs, N.Y.

His win, in the third race, gave the Hall of Fame jockey his 641st victory at the historic racetrack, one more than retired Hall of Fame rider Angel Cordero Jr. Bailey tied Cordero's mark in yesterday's first race, winning aboard Seaside Salute. . . .

Hall of Fame trainer Phil Johnson, who won the 2002 Breeders' Cup Classic with long shot Volponi, died at age 78. Johnson, who was treated for throat cancer for several years, died at his home in Rockville Centre, N.Y., his family said.

SOCCER: Kenya's suspension was lifted by soccer's governing body, allowing the country to resume World Cup qualifying.

FIFA suspended Kenya from international competition on June 2 because the government had taken over the national soccer federation.

-- From News Services

and Staff Reports

./A46910-2004Aug6.txt010064400037510000032000000025651010507770100142200ustar00spudftpweb00001400350331 It's hard to picture Tony Gonzalez spending a month with no one to talk to.

But there was the Kansas City Chiefs' all-pro tight end in the tiny Mexican town of San Miguel de Allende, sitting at the dinner table unable to understand a word of the conversation flying past him. The words were Spanish, and Gonzalez was just starting to learn the language.

"It's one of the best things I've ever done in my life," Gonzalez said.

It's a life that started in California, where Gonzalez played football, basketball and baseball. Unlike many members of his family, he never learned anything but English. Actually, his heritage is more Portuguese than Mexican.

So for a month this summer, Gonzalez lived with a Mexican family in San Miguel de Allende, where he had to speak almost nothing but Spanish. Language classes lasted six hours per day. And at times, it got lonesome.

"The first week I was down there I was thinking, 'What the hell am I doing? I'm supposed to be on vacation. This is ridiculous,' " he said.

He's planning additional study next year in Costa Rica and hopes to continue regular lessons during the season.

"It's a way to reach out to the Latin community in Kansas City," he said. "There aren't many football players other than kickers who are Latin."

-- From News Services

./A45478-2004Aug6,0.txt010066400007670000032000000066721010507724000141720ustar00wlogicweb00001400350331 The Washington Redskins are looking more likely to be without the services of at least a few key veterans Monday for their preseason opener. Starting linebackers LaVar Arrington (sore right shin) and Mike Barrow (tendinitis in left knee) missed the morning and evening practices yesterday, while running back Clinton Portis (groin pull) aggravated his injury in the morning practice and missed the night session, which was held at an undisclosed area high school.

Coach Joe Gibbs said he has not decided which injured players to rule out of Monday's game and director of sports medicine Bubba Tyer and his staff will meet today to make determinations on all the injured players, 14 total. Barrow's injury appeared serious, as he went down in the morning and could not finish practice. An MRI exam revealed tendinitis.

"We'll just take it day to day and see how he's doing," Tyer said.

Arrington's bruised shin should not keep him out much longer, Tyer said, and he could return to practice today.

Defensive end Phillip Daniels saw an abdominal specialist yesterday and got a good report, but he has been out most of the week with the strain and is expected out at least a few more days ("I think it will probably be awhile on that," Gibbs said).

Offensive lineman Randy Thomas continues to experience swelling in his knee and also pulled a muscle in his torso, forcing him out of practice yesterday.

Portis, meantime, first felt discomfort in his groin on Thursday and will be watched closely today to determine if he will be cleared to play Monday against Denver, the team he was acquired from for Champ Bailey in the offseason.

The Redskins kept practice brief this morning and spent the evening session hashing out details like the pregame warm up routine, running through halftime procedures, getting the players used to the substitution patterns and the general working of the coaching staff.

"We try to simulate the organization of what we'll do and get the players used to that," Gibbs said.

Rodgers Retires

Pepper Rodgers, the team's vice president of football operations, announced his retirement yesterday. Rodgers, 72, was a longtime associate of former coach Steve Spurrier. He spent four years in the organization and he was a central figure in attracting Spurrier to Washington from the University of Florida. However, his role has seemed to diminish in recent months with the regime change.

Gibbs is also the team's president and brought back much of the staff that coached with him here before. "Pepper has played an important role with the Redskins," owner Daniel Snyder said in a statement.

Getting Wired

One of the changes to which Gibbs is adapting after 11 years away from coaching is advances in sideline technology. Coaches now wear headsets that are wired to a quarterback's helmet to call plays; Gibbs and his staff were used to using hand signals and yelling to get the plays in.

Gibbs will be calling plays, with assistant head coach-offense Joe Bugel and offensive coordinator Don Breaux on the sidelines with him to assist. Quarterbacks coach Jack Burns will be wired with them from a perch in the press box getting an overhead view.

Gibbs is also studying the option of going for a two-point conversion, which was not part of the NFL during his previous tenure, and the ability to challenge calls with instant replay.

"I've got a lot to learn," he said.

./A37663-2004Aug3.txt010064400037510000032000000007271010402247400142140ustar00spudftpweb00001400350331Consumer Spending Drop Largest in 3 Years

Dow Falls 59 on Oil Prices, Spending News

Source: Bristol-Myers Likely to Pay $75M

Sales of New Cars, Trucks Rebound in July

Tyco Posts 63-Percent Jump in 3Q Profit

Oil Prices Climb to New Highs Worldwide

Martha Stewart Living Posts Wide 2Q Loss

Anthem Sues Over Blocked WellPoint Merger

Halliburton to Pay $7.5M to Settle Probe

Wachovia Says SEC Poised to Take Action

./A47858-2004Aug7.txt010064400037510000032000000076241010516201300142250ustar00spudftpweb00001400350331CASTLE ROCK, Colo. - Chris DiMarco's goal this week at The International is simple: wave to the crowd without playing the final hole. DiMarco had four birdies to complete his first round, then added nine more in the second for 31 points and a six-point lead Friday at The International.

At this rate, DiMarco might be able to skip a hole or two in the final round and still finish with enough points to win under the tournament's modified Stableford scoring system.

"I've always said my goal is to have enough points when I finish the 17th hole to just walk in," DiMarco said. "Just finish, walk off 17 and just kind of wave to everybody as I'm going down 18."

It could be a long time before he gets to that point.

Rain and lightning ended Thursday's first round, forcing half the field to return Friday for up to 33 holes at hilly Castle Pines Golf Club. Two more rounds of storms hit Friday, setting up another marathon day in the altitude for 72 players.

The second round will be completed Saturday morning and the top 70 plus ties will continue on to the third round.

"This course is a beast to walk and to walk 19 holes, its one too many," said Olin Browne, who was fourth with 17 points after playing 25 holes Friday. "You have to walk 32 holes and you're ready to slit your wrists at the end of the day."

First-round leader Rod Pampling was second with 25 points through 11 holes of the second round. Bob Tway was another point back, and Browne made the biggest move of the day, tying the tournament record with 10 birdies in an 18-point second round.

But they might have a hard time catching DiMarco, who has 31 points in a format that gives players anywhere from 8 points for a double eagle to minus-3 for a double bogey or worse.

And the way DiMarco has been putting, they might have no chance at all.

He's had just 49 putts in two rounds - 22 in the second - thanks to a change in stance before the final round of last week's Buick Open. DiMarco finished that tournament tied for 15th after closing with a 66, then shot 63 in a pro-am in Aspen earlier this week.

He's kept it rolling so far at The International.

DiMarco had six points through eight holes Thursday before the first round was stopped, then added eight more Friday morning to finish his first round.

He didn't stop there.

DiMarco opened his second round with a birdie on the par-5 first, worth two points, and added three more on the front nine. He followed with birdies on Nos. 10, 12, 14, 15 and 17 before losing a point with a bogey on the difficult par-4 finishing hole, tapping in a 1-footer after the first delay of 53 minutes.

If DiMarco maintains this pace, he might get a chance to test the tournament rule that requires players to give their "best effort" on every hole.

"Maybe there will be a little fine," DiMarco said. "But you know what? If you can guarantee me where I'm going to be on 17 (with a big lead) on Sunday, I'll do it right now. I'll take the fine."

With a scoring format that rewards aggressive play, the tournament is far from over.

Browne proved that anything can happen at Castle Pines, firing at flags in the soft conditions after struggling in the morning.

He finished his first round at minus-1 after two bogeys on his final seven holes, but it didn't carry over. Browne opened his second round with consecutive birdies and finished with four straight, finishing two points short of the tournament's single-round record.

"I just understand it sometimes," Browne said. "I just understand this game."

Tway stayed steady during his 27-hole day, getting three birdies in the morning to finish with nine points. He added five more birdies before getting stuck in the thick rough on No. 18 and close with a bogey.

"This week, you have to drive the ball in the fairway because you cannot play in the rough," Tway said. "That's the No. 1 priority."

day, setting up another marathon day in the altitude for 72 players.

The second round will be complete./A48071-2004Aug7.txt010064400037510000032000000103011010517757700142200ustar00spudftpweb00001400350331Bush Stresses Anti-Terror Drive in Address

KENNEBUNKPORT, Maine (AP) - The heightened state of alert in New York, Newark, N.J. and Washington is "a grim reminder" of terrorist threats that still face the United States, President Bush said Saturday. He defended the elevated warnings in the face of criticism they were based on old intelligence.

Iraqi Gov't Gives Amnesty for Minor Crimes

BAGHDAD, Iraq (AP) - Interim Iraqi Prime Minister Ayad Allawi signed a long-awaited amnesty law Saturday that would pardon Iraqis who have played minor roles in the country's 15-month-long insurgency, but not those guilty of killing. The amnesty had been expected to be a key element in the government's efforts to coax Iraqis away from the anti-U.S. campaign, but the more limited offer is unlikely to dampen the violence.

Blast Outside Bangladesh Hotel Injures 50

DHAKA, Bangladesh (AP) - A bomb exploded in the parking lot of a hotel in northeastern Bangladesh city where the opposition-backed mayor was holding a meeting, wounding at least 50 people, witnesses and doctors said. The attack happened outside the Hotel Gulshan in Sylhet city, 120 miles northeast of the capital, Dhaka, Mayor Badaruddin Kamran said.

S.F. Man Says Beheading Video Is a Hoax

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) - A video aired Saturday that purportedly showed an American being decapitated in Iraq was a hoax. The man shown in the video, reached by The Associated Press in San Francisco, said he videotaped the staged beheading at his friend's house using fake blood.

Small Planes Collide in N.J., Killing 5

KINNELON, N.J. (AP) - Two small planes collided Saturday morning in New Jersey, killing at least five people and sending one aircraft plunging into the back yard of a home. One person was trapped in a Cessna 150, but alive, and rescue workers were trying to free that person, said Holly Baker, a spokeswoman with the Federal Aviation Administration.

Spaniards Unhappy With Train Blast Probe

MADRID (AP) - Five months after the worst terror attack in Spain's history, a parliamentary inquiry into the March 11 Madrid train bombings has little to show save a spreading discomfort among Spaniards about its members' jockeying for political gain. The inquiry - now recessed after a month of hearings - has drawn unflattering comparisons to the recently concluded U.S. 9/11 investigation, which was perceived here to have been far more comprehensive, forward-looking and bipartisan.

Iraqi Government Shuts Al-Jazeera Station

BAGHDAD, Iraq (AP) - The Iraqi government closed the Iraqi offices of the Arab television station Al-Jazeera for 30 days, accusing it Saturday of inciting violence. A spokesman for Al-Jazeera called the closure "unwise" and said it restrained freedom of the press.

'Super Freak' Made James a Funk Legend

LOS ANGELES (AP) - Funk legend Rick James peaked in 1981 with "Super Freak," a song so enduring that a strain of its infectious bass line powered the MC Hammer hit "U Can't Touch This" nearly a decade later. But James' career never had the staying power of his signature hit, and the singer's life and music languished through cocaine addiction and a prison term. In his final days, James made a comeback bid that included playing along with routines by comedian Dave Chappelle that parodied his history of erratic behavior.

Company Said to Be Ready to Clone Pets

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) - A company that unveiled the world's first cloned cat nearly three years ago now says it is ready to start filling orders for cloned pets, a newspaper reported Thursday. Genetic Savings and Clone, a firm that wants to make a business out of cloned pets, now has Tabouli and Baba Ganoush, 8-week-old Bengal kittens who are the world's second and third cat clones.

Walker Traded to Power-Packed Cardinals

The St. Louis Cardinals had a power-packed lineup and the best record in baseball before they added Larry Walker. Good luck getting them out now. Walker was traded from Colorado to the Cardinals on Friday night for minor league pitcher Jason Burch and two players to be named. The five-time All-Star and 1997 NL MVP joins a team that features sluggers Albert Pujols, Scott Rolen and Jim Edmonds.

./A50765-2004Aug8.txt010064400037510000032000000007221010555774400142300ustar00spudftpweb00001400350331AP: Superiors Hindered Terror Prosecutors

Police: Xbox Theft Spurred Fla. Slayings

Poll Finds Americans Don't Mind Jury Duty

Search Called Off for Missing Calif. Boy

GOP Sen. Comes to U.S. Attorneys' Defense

Bush Aide Believes Terrorists Set Back

Koko the Gorilla Calls for the Dentist

Doctor in Anthrax Case Issued Warnings

Calif. GOP Opposes Stem Cell Proposition

Calif. Fires Blacken Thousands of Acres

./A46799-2004Aug6.txt010064400037510000032000000114131010503555100142240ustar00spudftpweb00001400350331CHAMP CAR WORLD SERIES-Named Joe Chrnelich executive vice president of development, government affairs and planning.

INDY RACING LEAGUE-Fined Don Lambert and Mike Sales, chief mechanics, and placed them on probation for the rest of the season for violations at Michigan International Speedway.

BASEBALL

American League

BOSTON RED SOX-Acquired LHP Mike Myers from Seattle for a player to be named or cash.

CHICAGO WHITE SOX-Placed LHP Scott Schoeneweis on the 15-day DL, retoactive to Aug. 5.

TORONTO BLUE JAYS-Traded 1B-DH Josh Phelps to Cleveland for 1B-OF Eric Crozier.

National League

MILWAUKEE BREWERS-Recalled RHP Wes Obermueller from Indianapolis of the IL. Designated RHP Matt Kinney for assignment.

NEW YORK METS-Announced OF Shane Spencer has cleared waivers and was given his outright release.

PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES-Placed RHP Kevin Millwood on the 15-day DL. Recalled RHP Geoff Geary from Scranton Wilkes-Barre of the IL.

Midwest League

CEDAR RAPIDS KERNELS-Announced OF Felix Nunez has been assigned to Rancho Cucamonga of the California League.

South Atlantic League

COLUMBUS CATFISH-Announced RHP Albenis Castillo, INF Luis Catillo and OF Emilio Marcos have been assigned to the team from Oregon of the Northwest League and RHP Eric Stults and OF Jereme Milons were promoted to Vero Beach of the Florida State League.

Atlantic League

ATLANTIC CITY SURF-Sold the contract of RHP Conor Brooks to the Boston Red Sox.

Eastern League

READING PHILLIES-Announced LHP Kyle Parcus has been assigned to the team from Lakewood of the South Atlantic League.

Frontier League

KALAMAZOO KINGS-Signed Mike Ziroli. Released RHP Mike Leishman and RHP Jon Musialowski.

RICHMOND ROOSTERS-Signed LHP Jason Pilkington.

WINDY CITY THUNDERBOLTS-Signed LHP Luis Villarreal and INF Nick Saunders.

BASKETBALL

National Basketball Association

LOS ANGELES LAKERS-Traded G Gary Payton, F Rick Fox, a conditional first-round draft pick and cash to the Boston Celtics for G Chucky Atkins, G Marcus Banks and F-C Chris Mihm.

MIAMI HEAT-Signed G Damon Jones.

NEW JERSEY NETS-Signed F Eric Williams to a three-year contract.

FOOTBALL

National Football League

CINCINNATI BENGALS-Waived WR Marlus Mays.

GREEN BAY PACKERS-Re-signed OT-G Joe Hayes. Waived DE Eric Powell.

MINNESOTA VIKINGS-Released WR Kenny Clark and QB Matt Kegel. Signed CB Reggie Austin and WR Tony Johnson.

NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS-Released QB Kurt Kittner, OT James Williams and DT DeVonte Peterson.

NEW ORLEANS SAINTS-Signed WR Devery Henderson to a four-year contract.

NEW YORK JETS-Signed G-C Pete Kendall.

HOCKEY

National Hockey League

BUFFALO SABRES-Re-signed F Jochen Hecht to a one-year contract.

CAROLINA HURRICANES-Agreed to terms with G Craig Kowalski on a two-year contract and G Rob Zepp on a one-year contract.

FLORIDA PANTHERS-Re-signed LW Ryan Jardine to a one-year contract.

MINNESOTA WILD-Re-signed RW Richard Park to a one-year contract.

OTTAWA SENATORS-Agreed with terms with D Chris Phillips and F Peter Schaefer on multiyear contracts.

PHILADELPHIA FLYERS-Signed C Michal Handzus to a three-year contract.

PHOENIX COYOTES-Signed RW Brett Hull to a two-year contract.

TORONTO MAPLE LEAFS-Re-signed G Mikael Tellqvist and F Clarke Wilm to one-year contracts.

WASHINGTON CAPITALS-Signed D Jeff Paul to a one-year contract.

Central Hockey League

AUSTIN ICE BATS-Signed F John McNabb to a one-year contract.

OKLAHOMA CITY BLAZERS-Signed F Pat Hallett.

ECHL

LONG BEACH ICE DOGS-Agreed to terms with D Mike Vellinga.

MISSISSIPPI SEA WOLVES-Acquired the rights to RW Martin Paquet from Long Beach for future considerations.

United Hockey League

ADIRONDACK FROSTBITE-Signed D Steve O'Rourke to a one year contract.

SOCCER

FIFA-Lifted the suspension of Kenya, allowing the country to resume World Cup qualifying.

COLLEGE

ANDERSON, S.C.-Named Chris Nall assistant baseball coach.

BLOOMFIELD-Named Patrick Dietz women's volleyball coach.

BUCKNELL-Named Annie Zinkavich women's graduate assistant field hockey coach.

NORTH DAKOTA-Named Dan Tannahill women's golf coach.

QUINCY-Named Chris Martin assistant baseball coach and Luke Strege men's assistant basketball coach.

SAMFORD-Named Shanna Cook women's assistant basketball coach.

STEPHEN F. AUSTIN-Announced the resignation of Rennie Bailey, men's assistant basketball coach.

VERMONT-Named Bruce Bosley athletic communications assistant.

WESTERN CONNECTICUT-Named Peter Schachter men's soccer coach.

WESTERN KENTUCKY-Extended the contract of Wood Selig, athletics

p>CINCINNATI BENGALS-Waived WR Marlus Mays.

GREEN BAY PACKERS-Re-signed OT-G Joe Hayes. Waived DE Eric Powell.

MINNESOTA VIKINGS-Released WR Kenny Clark and QB Matt Kegel. Signed CB Reggie Austin and WR Tony Johnson.

NEW ENG./A46911-2004Aug6.txt010064400037510000032000000027071010507770100142170ustar00spudftpweb00001400350331 Brett Hull, third on the NHL's career goals list, got more money and a longer contract from the Phoenix Coyotes than one of his former teams was willing to offer.

The free agent forward signed a two-year, $4.5 million deal with the Coyotes yesterday. Both years are guaranteed at $2.25 million, and Hull could stand to make up to $3 million the second year if he meets bonus incentives for scoring. The Dallas Stars, one of his former teams, offered Hull $2 million to rejoin them, but wouldn't give him a second year.

Hull, an 18-year veteran who spent the last three seasons with Detroit, has 741 goals -- trailing Coyotes managing partner WayneGretzky's 894 and GordieHowe's 801. Hull, who turns 40 on Monday, has also scored 103 playoff goals, fourth behind Gretzky, Mark Messier and Jari Kurri.

Hull, drafted by Calgary in the sixth round in 1984, has played for the Flames, St. Louis, Dallas and Detroit. He won Stanley Cups with the Stars (1999) and Red Wings (2002), scoring the cup-winning goal for Dallas in a triple-overtime Game 6 victory against Buffalo.

He has 649 assists and 1,390 points in 1,264 regular season games, and 87 assists (190 points) in 202 playoff games.

Hull, a nine-time all-star, won the Hart Trophy in 1991.

-- From News Services

./A47086-2004Aug7.txt010064400037510000032000000067531010505243500142260ustar00spudftpweb00001400350331 NEW YORK (Reuters) - Eric Chavez drove in the go-ahead run with an 11th inning double as the Oakland Athletics moved back into first place in the AL West with a 3-1 road win over the Minnesota Twins Friday.

Oakland climbed a half-game ahead of Texas in the division after the Rangers lost at Baltimore.

The Twins lost their second straight game, but still hold a six-game lead over the Chicago White Sox in the AL Central.

Chavez also had two hits and scored a run to pace the eight-hit Oakland attack.

Jermaine Dye, also in the 11th, and Marco Scutaro drove in the other runs for the A's.

Shannon Stewart hit a game-tying solo home run in the bottom of the ninth inning off Octavio Dotel to force extra innings and account for the Twins only run.

Dotel (2-5) rebounded to pitch three innings of relief for the win for Oakland, allowing one run on one hit with two strikeouts and one walk.

Juan Rincon (9-4) allowed two runs on three hits over 1 1/3 innings to take the loss.

In other games, Hideki Matsui hit two homers and drove in six runs to lead the New York Yankees to an 11-4 win over the Toronto Blue Jays.

John Flaherty also homered for the Yankees and Derek Jeter had three hits and drove in two runs.

Javier Vazquez (13-6) allowed three runs on six hits over eight innings for the win.

Sean Douglass (0-2) allowed seven runs on seven hits over 2 1/3 innings and took the loss. Carlos Delgado hit a three-run homer in the first inning for Toronto.

In Detroit, Dmitri Young had three hits and scored a pair of runs to lead the Tigers past the Boston Red Sox 4-3.

Carlos Guillen also had three hits for the Tigers, who snapped a four-game losing streak.

Roberto Novoa (1-0) got four outs in relief for his first major league win and Ugueth Urbina pitched the ninth for his 18th save.

Derek Lowe (9-10) allowed four runs on nine hits over seven innings, Jason Varitek homered for Boston.

Carl Crawford scored the game-winning run on an obstruction call to shortstop Jose Lopez as the Tampa Bay Devil Rays edged the Seattle Mariners 2-1 in 10 innings.

Travis Harper (4-2) pitched two scoreless innings of relief for the win.

Cliff Nageotte (1-6) allowed the winning run on one hit in one inning to take the loss.

In Kansas City, Kelvim Escobar pitched seven shutout innings, leading the Anaheim Angels to a 3-0 win over the Royals.

Escobar (6-8) allowed seven hits and walked one.

Troy Percival pitched the ninth for his 19th save and Robb Quinlan hit a two-run homer.

Darrell May (8-12) allowed three runs on six hits over seven innings to take the loss.

Miguel Tejada, Javy Lopez and Larry Bigbie all homered as the Baltimore Orioles routed the Texas Rangers 9-1.

Erik Bedard (5-6) allowed one run on five hits over 6 1/3 innings for the win. Tejada drove in two runs, giving him an AL leading 99 on the season.

Nick Regilio (0-3) allowed four runs -- two earned -- on two hits while getting just four outs in his third major league start.

In Chicago, Coco Crisp hit a three-run homer as the Cleveland Indians edged the White Sox 3-2.

C.C. Sabathia (8-6) allowed two runs -- one earned -- on five hits with eight strikeouts and one walk over seven innings for the win. Bob Wickman worked the ninth for his third save.

Mark Buehrle (10-5) went 6 2/3 innings, allowing three runs on nine hits with five strikeouts and one walk to take the loss.

./A47157-2004Aug7,0.txt010066400007670000032000000107261010506122200141530ustar00wlogicweb00001400350331CASTLE ROCK, Colo. -- Chris DiMarco's goal this week at The International is simple: wave to the crowd without playing the final hole.

DiMarco had four birdies to complete his first round, then added nine more in the second for 31 points and a six-point lead before play was halted because of darkness Friday at The International.

At this rate, DiMarco might be able to skip a hole or two in the final round and still finish with enough points to win under the tournament's modified Stableford scoring system.

"I've always said my goal is to have enough points when I finish the 17th hole to just walk in," DiMarco said. "Just finish, walk off 17 and just kind of wave to everybody as I'm going down 18."

It could be a long time before he gets to that point.

Rain and lightning ended Thursday's first round, forcing half the field to return Friday for up to 33 holes at hilly Castle Pines Golf Club. Two more rounds of storms hit Friday, setting up another marathon day in the altitude for 72 players.

The second round will be completed Saturday morning and the top 70 plus ties will continue on to the third round.

"This course is a beast to walk and to walk 19 holes, its one too many," said Olin Browne, who was fourth with 17 points after playing 25 holes Friday. "You have to walk 32 holes and you're ready to slit your wrists at the end of the day."

First-round leader Rod Pampling was second with 25 points through 11 holes of the second round. Bob Tway and Geoff Ogilvy each had 18 points and Browne made the biggest move of the day, tying the tournament record with 10 birdies in an 18-point second round.

But they might have a hard time catching DiMarco, who had 17 points in the second round of a format that gives players anywhere from 8 points for a double eagle to minus-3 for a double bogey or worse.

And the way DiMarco has been putting, they might have no chance at all.

He's had just 49 putts in two rounds -- 22 in the second -- thanks to a change in stance before the final round of last week's Buick Open. DiMarco finished that tournament tied for 15th after closing with a 66, then shot 63 in a pro-am in Aspen earlier this week.

He's kept it rolling so far at The International.

DiMarco had six points through eight holes Thursday before the round was stopped, then added eight more Friday morning to finish his first round.

He didn't stop there.

DiMarco opened his second round with a birdie on the par-5 first, worth two points, and added three more on the front nine. He followed with birdies on Nos. 10, 12, 14, 15 and 17 before losing a point with a bogey on the difficult par-4 finishing hole, tapping in a 1-footer after the first delay of 53 minutes.

If DiMarco maintains this pace, he might get a chance to test the tournament rule that requires players to give their "best effort" on every hole.

"Maybe there will be a little fine," DiMarco said. "But you know what? If you can guarantee me where I'm going to be on 17 (with a big lead) on Sunday, I'll do it right now. I'll take the fine."

DiMarco led by 13 points before Pampling made a late run just before dark. The Aussie dropped to 14 points with a bogey on No. 10, his first hole, but closed his round with three birdies in five holes.

"We played well and made the right putts that we needed to make," Pampling said. "We still have a few holes to catch (him), so we'll see what we can do tomorrow."

And with a scoring format that rewards aggressive play, the tournament is far from over.

Browne proved that anything can happen at Castle Pines, firing at flags in the soft conditions after struggling in the morning.

He finished his first round at minus-1 after two bogeys on his final seven holes, but it didn't carry over. Browne opened his second round with consecutive birdies and finished with four straight, finishing two points short of the tournament's single-round record.

"I just don't understand it sometimes," Browne said. "I just don't understand this game."

Tway stayed steady during his 27-hole day, getting three birdies in the morning to finish with nine points. He added five more birdies before getting stuck in the thick rough on No. 18 and close with a bogey.

"This week, you have to drive the ball in the fairway because you cannot play in the rough," Tway said. "That's the No. 1 priority."

./A46912-2004Aug6.txt010064400037510000032000000026441010507770100142200ustar00spudftpweb00001400350331 MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL

New York Mets at St. Louis 1 p.m. WTTG-5, WBFF-45

Texas at Baltimore 4:30 p.m. WDCA-20, WJZ-13 [WTEM-980, WBAL-1090, WAGE-1200, WNAV-1430]

SOCCER

MLS, Columbus at New England 4 p.m. ESPN2

MLS, D.C. United at San Jose 10 p.m. Comcast SportsNet [WMET-1160, WYSK-1350 (Spanish), WPWC-1480 (Spanish), WACA-1540 (Spanish)]

LITTLE LEAGUE WORLD SERIES

Southeast regional final 7 p.m. ESPN

GOLF

LPGA, Jamie Farr Classic 2 p.m. ESPN2

PGA, the International 3 p.m. WUSA-9, WJZ-13

USGA, Junior Amateur tournament (taped) 4:30 p.m. WRC-4, WBAL-11

Champions Tour, 3M Championship 5 p.m. Golf Channel

TENNIS

ATP, Western and Southern Financial Group Masters 6 p.m. ESPN2

WTA, Rogers Cup 10 p.m. ESPN2

AUTO RACING

NASCAR Nextel Cup Series, Brickyard 400 qualifying 11 a.m. TNT

AMA Motocross (taped) noon ESPN2

NASCAR Busch Series, Kroger 200 8 p.m. TNT

HORSE RACING

The Hambletonian 2 p.m. WUSA-9, WJZ-13

Whitney Handicap 5 p.m. ESPN

BOXING

WBO lightweight championship, Acelino Freitas vs. Diego Corrales 9 p.m. Showtime

SKATEBOARDING

National championship (taped) 3:30 p.m. WRC-4, WBAL-11

./A46913-2004Aug6.txt010064400037510000032000000075651010507722300142270ustar00spudftpweb00001400350331 Democratic presidential nominee John F. Kerry and wife Teresa Heinz Kerry are not quite on the same script when it comes to whether President Bush responded appropriately in the stunned first moments when he learned on Sept. 11, 2001, that a plane had struck the World Trade Center.

On Thursday, Kerry told a convention of minority journalists that he would have reacted more decisively to the news than Bush, who continued reading with a group of Florida schoolchildren for seven minutes after an aide whispered the news into his ear. It's a scene that filmmaker Michael Moore uses to skewer the president in his anti-Bush movie, "Fahrenheit 9/11."

"I would have told those kids very nicely and politely that the president of the United States has something that he needs to attend to," Kerry said.

The candidate's wife, on the other hand, is not so sure an abrupt response would have been the right one. "I think the president behaved correctly in terms of being quiet amidst stunning news like that in a classroom of kids," she told the host of MSNBC's "Hardball With Chris Matthews" during an interview before the Democratic National Convention last month. "You know, what can you do? It takes you a couple of minutes to digest what you have just heard. And then he was . . . not in his White House and in his office with all of his people. He was in the school in Florida."

Kerry's case that he would have acted with more swiftness and poise than Bush was also undermined by another interview -- this one with the candidate himself. On July 8, Kerry recalled for CNN's Larry King his actions that day. He was in a meeting in the office of Senate Minority Leader Thomas A. Daschle (D-S.D.) when he watched the second plane hit the World Trade Center on television, while standing next to fellow senators Barbara Boxer (D-Calif.) and Harry M. Reid (D-Nev.). "And we shortly thereafter sat down at the table, and then we just realized nobody could think, and then, boom, we saw the cloud of the explosion at the Pentagon."

The Bush-Cheney campaign noted that there were 40 minutes between the second trade center attack and a plane hitting the Pentagon. "By Kerry's own words, he and his fellow senators sat there for 40 minutes, realizing 'nobody could think,' " said a campaign statement. "He is hardly in a position to criticize President Bush for 'inaction.' "

Keyes Likely Obama Challenger

Republican former presidential candidate Alan Keyes will be back in a familiar role -- running for the Senate -- in an unfamiliar place, as a rumored candidacy in Illinois now looks like a done deal. Keyes, a Maryland resident, will make it official with an announcement Sunday, according to senior GOP officials quoted by several news organizations.

Keyes has run for Senate twice from Maryland, and sought the 2000 presidential nomination on a strong culturally conservative platform. He won few votes but some praise for his theatrical speaking style. He has until Election Day, Nov. 2, to establish residency in Illinois.

The Keyes bid is the latest turn in a race that has already had a few strange ones. The GOP vacancy is open because the party's original nominee, primary winner Jack Ryan, dropped out amid furor over his ex-wife's allegation in divorce papers that he pressured her to attend sex clubs.

Democratic nominee Barack Obama, who drew rave reviews with his convention keynote address last month, remains the overwhelming favorite in polls for election, but a Keyes candidacy would create a first: Never in a Senate race have both major party candidates been African Americans.

Quotable

"The one thing we can say about George W. Bush is we will be forever in his debt."

-- Rep. Rahm Emanuel (D-Ill.), after the administration's recent announcement that this year's deficit, an estimated $445 billion, will set a red-ink record.

./A46914-2004Aug6.txt010064400037510000032000000060111010504320000141750ustar00spudftpweb00001400350331 SCHOOL DISTRICTS in America in need of a superintendent ought to study carefully all of the District's search efforts since school chief Paul L. Vance quit in November -- and then do exactly the opposite. During the past nine months, D.C. residents have watched with astonishment as the mayor, the Council, the Board of Education and an assortment of other officials have rushed off in all directions, then come together only to go around in circles, all the while making a confounding mess out of a search process that most U.S. school districts learned to master early in the last century. Two sentences from this week's news stories sum up the current state of affairs with D.C. schools:

"Sixty-eight of the 149 city schools that were assessed failed for the second year in a row to make adequate yearly progress in reading and math, as measured by the Stanford 9 tests administered in April." -- front page, Aug. 3. And . . .

"A 39-year-old Virginia state official without experience in education has suddenly emerged as a front-runner to be the next superintendent of the District's public schools." -- Metro, Aug. 5.

We're burning with curiosity about what comes next.

The test results tell one part of the story. Some 33,000 D.C. students are enrolled in schools that have failed for two years in a row to meet test score benchmarks. Twelve of the city's 15 high schools are in that failing category. Looked at another way: Because of low test scores, low-income children at nearly half of the District's public schools now qualify for extra tutorial help under the federal No Child Left Behind Act.

Now, contrast that disappointing student educational achievement record with the pace at which city leaders have moved to find a superintendent possessing the educational experience, management talent, knowledge of curriculum and leadership skills to improve a hard-pressed 64,000-student system. If you see a disconnect, welcome to the club.

This latest twist in the search for a superintendent -- the sudden emergence of 39-year-old lawyer Maurice Jones -- caught even the 17-member search committee by surprise. Until news broke about Mr. Jones's candidacy, the committee was operating under the belief that the four finalists of seasoned educators they had selected and agreed on last month were the only names in play. Little did they know that the group calling itself the "education advisory collaborative" -- the mayor, three school board members, two council members and the city administrator -- would make an end run around the search committee and interview Mr. Jones without telling them. But that happens to be the unpredictable way in which the search has been conducted. Whim, not purpose, drives the process.

So with the opening of school only weeks away and the school system fearful that it lacks enough money to provide tutoring to all the students entitled to it, the search, such as it is, goes on. This is education in the twilight zone.

./A46915-2004Aug6.txt010064400037510000032000000047131010504320100142060ustar00spudftpweb00001400350331 IT'S BEEN OUR observation that most shoppers would rather spend 20 minutes cruising the mall parking lot in search of a close-in space than four minutes walking to the store from a slightly more distant one. All the more reason, then, in this obesity-obsessed nation, why it should be regarded as a fine thing when large numbers of people decide to hike half a mile or more on a Sunday afternoon, even if it is only en route to a mostly sedentary three hours of mass entertainment.

In Prince George's County, however, walking has been made an illegal act if one commits it while attempting to approach FedEx Field to see the Washington Redskins play. Barricades and security guards prevent people who park in places other than the official Redskins lots from using the sidewalks on the only practical route leading to FedEx. It's a matter of public safety, the county says -- busy intersection, lots of traffic, all those people walking right next to the road. Some of the fans who prefer to park off premises and walk think that it may be more a matter of the $25 per vehicle the Redskins can get from people who park in authorized lots rather than, say, on the free lot of a nearby shopping center. The no-pedestrians policy is the work of a "coordinating group," which includes representatives of the county, the Redskins, the stadium and residents.

Last December a circuit judge ordered an end to the pedestrian ban because it had been imposed without the required public notice or participation. In the spring the county readopted the policy, a decision that is being appealed by some of the fans. "Post-9/11 we're no longer an open society," said Vernon Herron, chairman of the panel. "These measures are absolutely critical for the safety of all who are in that stadium."

Oh, come on, folks. Prince George's is a large, rapidly growing county that very much wants to be in the big time. Its most well-known structure -- famous throughout the land and the NFL -- is FedEx Field. This is a landmark. It is not the kind of place that you make it impossible to walk to. If it really is unsafe for pedestrians approaching FedEx, then it's the county's job, with perhaps a little financial help from the Redskins, to make it safe -- just as jurisdictions throughout this urban region are attempting to do for pedestrians everywhere. It was a big mistake not to build the Redskins' new home next to a Metro station. Don't compound it by taking away the sidewalks too.

./A46004-2004Aug6.txt010064400037510000032000000012451010476336500142130ustar00spudftpweb00001400350331CHICAGO - Soybean futures declined while grain futures finished mixed Friday on the Chicago Board of Trade.

Wheat for September delivery fell 5 3/4 cents to $3.15 3/4 a bushel; September corn rose 1 3/4 cent to $2.25 3/4 a bushel; September oats remained unchanged at $1.32 a bushel; September soybeans fell 12 1/4 cents to $5.69 1/4 a bushel.

Beef and pork futures ended mixed on the Chicago Mercantile Exchange.

September live cattle remained unchanged at 86.90 cents a pound; September feeder cattle rose .03 cent to $1.1245 a pound; October lean hogs rose .60 cent to 70.75 cents a pound; February pork bellies fell .80 cent to 96.45 cents a pound.

./A35167-2004Aug2.txt010064400037510000032000000007151010354571500142140ustar00spudftpweb00001400350331Bush Calls for New Intelligence Director

Tropical Storm Alex Nears Outer Banks

Statue of Liberty to Reopen to Visitors

Businesses Operate Under Heavy Security

Police Arrest Husband of Missing Woman

Lawyers: England Is Iraq Abuse Scapegoat

Expert: Scott Peterson Was Going Broke

Ex-Judge Appeals to Court to Reclaim Job

5 People Killed in Missouri Plane Crash

Univ. of Phoenix to Accept Young Students

./A46916-2004Aug6.txt010064400037510000032000000067521010504320300142160ustar00spudftpweb00001400350331 LIKE MEMBERS OF Congress and top administration officials, including the president, federal judges must file annual financial disclosure reports. But unlike those other government officials, judges can seek to shield from public view some -- or even all -- of their financial information on the grounds that its disclosure would endanger them. In a study of this special exception, the Government Accountability Office found that fewer than 10 percent of judges sought such redactions. But the overwhelming majority -- 90 percent -- of the 661 requests made between 1999 and 2002 were granted, in whole or in part, according to the GAO. More troubling, in each of those years, 13 to 15 judges were able to have their entire financial disclosure forms blacked out.

The judges' exception, put in place in 1998, is set to expire next year. Before renewing it, Congress ought to take a close look at how it's working. Judges certainly face serious safety concerns, although many other government officials -- say, U.S. attorneys -- do as well and nonetheless still have to file public disclosure forms. The judges argue that even information that seems innocuous may provide clues to someone intent on causing harm. For example, almost half the redactions involved the source of the spouse's outside income, information that could reveal an unsecured location at which to find a judge or family member. A similar problem could be posed by having a vacation home listed among the judge's assets.

Still, it's difficult to imagine a circumstance that could justify redacting an entire disclosure form. How could revealing a judge's stock holdings pose a threat? It's not difficult, though, to see the harm caused by keeping such information secret. The public has a legitimate interest in making certain that public officials don't decide matters in which they have a financial interest. Anyone who thinks that judges would never do so should take a look at the prize-winning reporting by Joe Stephens, now at The Post, that demonstrated repeated instances of such behavior.

But the judiciary seems to suffer from an allergy to disclosure that other officials have learned to live with -- and that is perhaps the most disturbing revelation of the GAO report. Its rules serve to frustrate access to such information rather than to facilitate it. Where forms for other branches of government are easily and promptly available, the process for obtaining access to judges' forms is structured to dissuade.

First, judges are informed of the identity of anyone seeking a copy of their forms. But what litigant who suspects a conflict would want to risk angering the judge hearing the case? Second, where other officials' forms are available on request and often on the Internet, those asking for judges' disclosures often have to wait weeks for the information -- by which point it may no longer be relevant. The GAO found that in 2002, the median wait -- before the report was put in the mail -- was 73 days.

One sensible solution, proposed by Sen. Patrick J. Leahy (D-Vt.), would be to have judges post public recusal lists of companies and other financial holdings that, if involved in a particular case, would require them to step aside; these lists would supplement, not replace, the availability of disclosure forms. This mechanism strikes a reasonable balance between judges' legitimate security concerns and the public's right to meaningful access. That balance now tilts too far in the former direction.

./A47584-2004Aug7.txt010064400037510000032000000016411010512542500142200ustar00spudftpweb00001400350331Sporadic Explosions, Gunfire in Najaf Follow Two Days of Bloody Clashes

American Seen in Islamic Online Video Being Decapitated After Telling U.S. to Leave Iraq

AP Poll: Kerry Narrows Gap With Bush on Protecting the Country but Race Remains Tight

AP Exclusive: Arrests Lead to a Web of Militancy Stretching From Pakistan to Britain to U.S.

Information on Buildings in Terror Warning Had Been Accessed, Perhaps Updated, Official Says

Employment Growth Lethargic, With Just 32,000 New Jobs in July Three Months Before Election

Iranian Detainee Refuses to Appear at U.S. Military Hearing, Sixth to Boycott Process in a Week

Funk Legend Rick James, Best Known for 1981 Hit 'Super Freak,' Dies in Los Angeles at Age 56

New Deep-Sea Research Vessel Will Be Able to Carry People to 99 Percent of the Ocean Floor

Larry Walker Traded to Already Power-Packed St. Louis Cardinals

./A46917-2004Aug6.txt010064400037510000032000000023321010504320400142060ustar00spudftpweb00001400350331 Benjamin Forgey's five-part series on the future of the Anacostia waterfront [Style, July 12-16] touched on the key issue that will determine the success or failure of Mayor Anthony A. Williams's grand plan: cleaning up and protecting the Anacostia River.

We must overhaul the antiquated sewer systems in the District and Maryland suburbs that are spewing raw sewage into the Anacostia and its tributaries. And we have to significantly reduce storm-water runoff from the watershed drainage basin, which washes oil, grease, pet waste and other toxic pollutants into the river through storm drains and gutters. The runoff comes primarily from parking lots, rooftops and roads.

New development on the Anacostia will have a major effect on the river as well. It can either produce more polluted runoff or it can provide a model of environmentally responsible design. People will not be drawn to the riverfront if the Anacostia is filthy.

As Mr. Forgey said, clean the water: The money and the people will follow.

ROBERT BOONE

President

Anacostia Watershed Society

Bladensburg

DIANA DASCALU

Natural Resources Defense Council

Washington

./A46918-2004Aug6.txt010064400037510000032000000022421010504320600142110ustar00spudftpweb00001400350331Twice recently, the D.C. dining scene has been disparaged in The Post by out-of-towners. Maybe such gibes had a kernel of truth in the past, but not now. Our restaurants have award-winning chefs serving creative cuisine in glamorous surroundings.

First, the July 20 Reliable Source reprinted from Details magazine the ill-mannered attack on Washington's lack of taste by the co-owner of New York's Four Seasons Restaurant, Julian Niccolini. Thankfully, the Reliable Source included my challenge to those assertions.

Then in an Aug. 1 Style article, Alain de Botton unfairly besmirched D.C. restaurants as not "that good" and our residents as "geeky."

On the other hand, Mayor Anthony A. Williams deserves kudos for his determination to show the world that the District remains open for business despite the sensationalism of the recent terrorism alert. His dining at Kinkead's sent the perfect message: While we remain vigilant, life in the capital continues with our inherent joie de vivre.

LYNNE BREAUX

Executive Director

Restaurant Association

Metropolitan Washington

Washington

./A46919-2004Aug6.txt010064400037510000032000000037571010504321000142210ustar00spudftpweb00001400350331 Virgil Soule ["HOV: Never Worked, Won't Work. Can't We Get Rid of It?" Close to Home, Aug. 1] apparently has never used the HOV lanes with any regularity or he would appreciate their intent and success at attracting carpoolers.

Mr. Soule complained that the HOV lanes were used almost exclusively by "cheaters and single drivers plus the occasional tractor-trailer." This is untrue, although I have occasionally seen those without the requisite number of occupants being stopped and ticketed.

I gave up traveling in my own car and, in exchange, I save 30 minutes of commuting time. I also save gas money, cut down on air pollution, local traffic and proudly wear the badge of that part of the public that responds to calls for the public good. All around, it's a good deal.

If people refuse to make these trade-offs, they get no sympathy from me. But I do feel the envious eyes of drivers in the regular lanes as my carpool whizzes by them.

ALVIN CHIN

Burke

Mr. Soule's observations on cheaters in the HOV lanes are wrong. I ride my motorcycle to work every day in the HOV lane, weather permitting, and I notice how many folks are cheating. Cheaters will always be with us, but there aren't that many. It's important to note that the HOV lane is restricted for only three hours in the morning and three hours in the evening. Mr. Soule said that those lanes tend to be empty while normal lanes are congested. I've found that HOV lanes get pretty packed during rush hour.

I work in the Pentagon, and most of those I work with come from Prince William or Stafford county. Most carpool or take a bus to enjoy the benefits of HOV.

I'm from Los Angeles, where freeways tend to have more lanes, but they haven't done much to help traffic flow. Under Mr. Soule's plan we'd just go from four clogged lanes to six clogged lanes.

Mr. Soule should quit whining and pick up a slug if he must drive on Interstate 95 during rush hour.

JACK ROBERTS

Springfield

./A46920-2004Aug6.txt010064400037510000032000000052461010504321100142050ustar00spudftpweb00001400350331 In the past six years, the cost to Montgomery County of providing prescription drug benefits to the employees and retirees of public schools has gone from $20 million to $40 million per year [editorial, July 31]. And that's just the school system. This is unsustainable.

Therefore, in April, we, with County Council member George L. Leventhal (D-At Large), introduced a resolution to establish a voluntary program to allow current and retired county employees to purchase prescription drugs from Canada. After extensive review, the council's Management and Fiscal Policy Committee unanimously endorsed the idea and set a timeline for having a program running by early 2005. Most of the council supports the proposal. The council will vote on the resolution in September.

In reviewing the feasibility of a voluntary drug re-importation program, we reviewed safety, cost and legal concerns.

Safety is the most important issue, and it is the easiest to address. Three million Americans purchase prescription drugs from Canada, spending about $1 billion last year. Several U.S. cities and states also buy drugs from Canada and have encountered no safety problems. Canada's drug system is one of the world's safest. The concerns raised by the Food and Drug Administration and by the pharmaceutical industry are bogus, plain and simple.

Our experts estimate that the county could save $6 million to $15 million a year, depending on participation rates. County employees also would benefit from reduced or eliminated co-payments. The FDA contends that our proposal is illegal, although it hasn't sued Minnesota, Wisconsin or any other government entity that has a program in place. Nevertheless, we have crafted a plan that will enable us to put our best foot forward in the unlikely event that the courts decide the issue.

We have great respect for the FDA. However, the FDA is letting politics drive its science. Twice Congress has directed the agency to design a program for the safe re-importation of Canadian drugs. So far, nothing. We also value our relationship with the biotech industry, and our resolution exempts biomeds, so the program will not cost the county's biotech industry a penny.

The pharmaceutical industry says that it needs to charge U.S. consumers exorbitant prices so that it can recover its research and development costs. But the industry's marketing budgets, by a number of estimates, dwarf its R&D costs. Maybe fewer Viagra ads on TV could make prescription drugs more affordable.

TOM PEREZ

(D-Silver Spring)

HOWARD A. DENIS

(R-Potomac-Bethesda)

Montgomery County Council

Rockville

./A46921-2004Aug6.txt010064400037510000032000000023671010504321300142110ustar00spudftpweb00001400350331In his Monday news conference [front page, Aug. 3] President Bush seemed to embrace the Sept. 11 commission's call for a national intelligence director, then tipped his hand when asked about the job description. Not in the White House? Not Cabinet level? Only "input" on the intelligence budget?

Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld, Vice President Cheney and the military-industrial establishment fought changes in the intelligence hierarchy and budget management when proposals came from the Rockefeller Commission and congressional committees in 1976. They fought again in 1992 after the chairmen of the House and Senate intelligence committees introduced reform legislation.

What is at stake is more than rearranging bureaucratic boxes. Eighty percent of the intelligence budget is managed by the Defense Department in a system of revolving military-industrial doors where the secrecy that the work demands masks billion-dollar, no-bid contracts and hinders accountability.

If the recommendation of the Sept. 11 commission is as important as it seems, we will be better off if Congress waits to see if we have new leadership coming to the White House. Even then, change won't come easily.

TYRUS G. FAIN

Marathon, Tex.

./A46922-2004Aug6.txt010064400037510000032000000015671010504321400142140ustar00spudftpweb00001400350331 The anger revealed in the recent anti-Kerry ads sponsored by the Swift Boat Veterans for Truth is nothing new [front page, Aug. 6]. As a college student in the late '60s and early '70s, I remember two groups of Vietnam veterans on campus: one that supported the war and one that did not. That anger continues, but it does not justify the attack on Sen. John Kerry.

Courage takes many forms. Not only was Mr. Kerry courageous in wartime but he risked his political future challenging the conduct of the war.

Although a Democrat, I was prepared to stand with Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) in 2000 and feel immense pride supporting Mr. Kerry in 2004. Both men faced the issues and their experience of the Vietnam War with thoughtfulness, dignity and courage, and both have contributed to the healing of this nation.

GEORGE LAUMANN

Arlington

./A46938-2004Aug6.txt010064400037510000032000000033061010504337500142240ustar00spudftpweb00001400350331HOUSTON - Astros shortstop Adam Everett broke a bone in his left wrist as Houston beat the Montreal Expos 4-0 Friday night behind Roy Oswalt's five-hitter.

Everett was hit by a pitch from Claudio Vargas in the fourth inning and broke the ulnar bone. Everett, batting .272 with eight homers and 31 RBIs, was taken to a hospital for X-rays. Houston said he will be sidelined for at least four weeks and it was unclear whether he would need surgery.

Oswalt (12-8) struck out eight and walked one in his second shutout of the season, the third of his career. Oswalt, who threw 133 pitches, has won four straight decisions overall, and he improved to 9-0 against Montreal in 13 career starts.

Jeff Bagwell and Jeff Kent drove in two runs each for Houston.

Montreal was shut out for the 15th time this season - no other team has been blanked more than nine times.

Expos starter Rocky Biddle (3-6) was hit on the right ankle by a line drive off the bat of Lance Berkman in the third inning, with the ball bouncing all the way back across the first-base line. Biddle left the game with a bruised ankle, and Montreal said he was day to day.

Bagwell hit a solo homer in the second inning, tying Frank Thomas for 30th on the career list at 436. After Biddle left, Claudio Vargas relieved and loaded the bases with a walk to Carlos Beltran, then forced in a run with a walk to Bagwell.

Kent hit a two-run single in the seventh against Sun Woo Kim.

Notes:@ Bagwell and are tied for the most home runs among active players who spent their entire careers with the same team. ... Craig Biggio was hit by a pitch for the 13th time this season, raising his career total to 255, the most in the NL.

eff Bagwell and Jeff Kent drove in two runs each for Houston.

Montreal was shut out for the 15th time this season - no other team has been blanked more than nine times.

Expos starter Rocky Biddle (3-6) was hit on the right ankle by a line drive off the bat of Lance Berkman in the third inning, with th./A46940-2004Aug6.txt010064400037510000032000000001631010504340700142070ustar00spudftpweb00001400350331 INSIDE: Crowding Into the Inova Fairfax ER Page F2 Elusive Adulthood Page F3 Quick Study Page F6

./A47088-2004Aug7.txt010064400037510000032000000027331010505325400142220ustar00spudftpweb00001400350331SALT LAKE CITY - A soldier wounded in a firefight in Afghanistan and the widow of another soldier killed in the battle are suing the estate of a suspected al-Qaida financier whose son was involved in the attack.

The lawsuit alleges the late Ahmed Said Khadr failed to control his then-15-year-old son and prevent him from intentionally harming others in the July 2002 battle.

Army Sgt. 1st Class Layne Morris, of Utah, lost his right eye in the attack; Sgt. 1st Class Christopher James Speer, 28, died from his injuries.

Morris and Speer's widow, Tabitha Speer, filed the lawsuit Friday.

Khadr, an Egyptian-born, naturalized Canadian citizen, is said to have been killed in a gunfight in Pakistan last October. The lawsuit alleges that his son, Omar Khadr, killed Speer and contributed to Morris' injuries.

Assets from Ahmed Said Khadr's estate have been frozen by the U.S. and Canadian governments.

The lawsuit, which seeks millions in damages, claims the funds come from an Islamic charity used to set up and run an al-Qaida training camp in Afghanistan.

The elder "Khadr knowingly provided material support and resources in the form of money and services, as well as his flesh and blood" to al-Qaida, the lawsuit states. "Khadr had a duty as a parent to exercise reasonable care to control his minor child."

Omar Khadr, now 17, is being held at the U.S. Naval Base in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, after being captured by U.S. forces in Afghanistan.

./A46941-2004Aug6.txt010064400037510000032000000050761010506333400142210ustar00spudftpweb00001400350331 SEATTLE, Aug. 6 -- Microsoft Corp. announced the release of a long-awaited security update for its Windows XP program on Friday in response to the growing number of security shortcomings in the market-dominant computer operating system.

The free upgrade won't be available to everyone right away, however. Microsoft said the timing will depend on several factors, including customers' Internet usage, location and language as well as the overall demand for the package, dubbed Service Pack 2.

Customers who have computers set to receive updates automatically will begin getting Service Pack 2 within a few days, company spokesman Matt Pilla said Friday. About 100 million customers are expected to receive the automatic updates over the next two months.

Customizing the fixes in 25 languages will take two months, the company said. The update is currently available only in English, and English-language users will get the update as Microsoft distributes it to computer manufacturers, companies and home users through downloads, free CDs and other means.

The upgrade, which Chairman Bill Gates said modifies less than 5 percent of the nearly three-year-old operating system, is designed to make users safer from cyberattacks by sealing entries to viruses, better protecting personal data and fending off spyware.

For most users, the most noticeable change will be a series of new prompts. Users will be asked to give permission for programs to interact with their computers, so there is less chance that their computers will be hit by a virus or inadvertently admit malicious software that can monitor computer activities.

The update automatically turns on a firewall to better guard against attempts to infiltrate personal computers. And it fortifies protections on the Internet Explorer browser and offers tougher policing against e-mail-borne attacks.

A new "Windows Security Center" will help monitor security programs -- including those from outside companies that offer other safeguards, such as anti-virus protection.

Service Pack 2 should be available on compact disc and at windowsupdate.microsoft.comby end of the month, Pilla said. New computers will start shipping with it in September or October.

Most users will have to download about 80 megabytes of data for the upgrade. Because the data pack is so big, users are being urged to turn on an automatic update function that will let Microsoft slowly download Service Pack 2 with minimal disruption to normal computer activities.

./A46939-2004Aug6.txt010064400037510000032000000052031010504341300142140ustar00spudftpweb00001400350331GLENDALE, Ariz. - Brett Hull, third on the NHL's career goals list, got more money and a longer contract from the Phoenix Coyotes than one of his former teams was willing to offer.

The free agent forward signed a $4.5 million, two-year deal with the Coyotes on Friday. Both years are guaranteed at $2.25 million, and Hull could stand to make up to $3 million the second year if he meets bonus incentives for scoring.

The Dallas Stars, one of his former teams, offered Hull $2 million to rejoin them, but wouldn't give him a second year.

Hull, an 18-year veteran who spent the last three seasons with Detroit, has 741 goals - trailing only Coyotes managing partner Wayne Gretzky's 894 and Gordie Howe's 801. Hull, who turns 40 on Monday, has also scored 103 playoff goals, fourth behind Gretzky, Mark Messier and Jari Kurri.

"The truth is going to come forward when we get on the ice and see how this group comes together," Coyotes general manager Mike Barnett said. "But we needed to fill some important holes, and certainly a high-scoring left-winger is very, very important to us.

"We now feel with (Shane) Doan and Ladislav Nagy and Mike Johnson and now Brett Hull, we have four wingers that are capable of scoring 25 or more goals."

Barnett said he got the feeling Hull was leaning toward the Coyotes during a phone call Thursday night. He told Gretzky, who also put in a call to Hull, and the player called back Friday morning to accept.

"He looked at our roster and felt that he could help us get to the winner's circle," Barnett said.

Bobby Hull Jr., the player's brother and agent, did not immediately respond to messages seeking comment left at his office and on his cell phone. The Coyotes plan to introduce Brett Hull at a news conference Tuesday.

Hull, drafted by Calgary in the sixth round in 1984, has played for the Flames, St. Louis, Dallas and Detroit. He won Stanley Cups with the Stars (1999) and Red Wings (2002), scoring the cup-winning goal for Dallas in a triple-overtime Game 6 victory against Buffalo.

He has 649 assists and 1,390 points in 1,264 regular-season games, and 87 assists (190 points) in 202 playoff games.

Hull, a nine-time All-Star, won the Hart Trophy in 1991 and was the All-Star Game MVP in 1992.

He had his three best seasons in succession with St. Louis, with 72 goals and 113 points in 1989-90, career highs for goals (86) and points (131) in 1990-91 and 70 goals and 109 points the next year. Hull had a career-high 47 assists in 1992-93, when he had 101 points, his last season in triple digits.

He had 30, 37 and 25 goals the last three seasons with Detroit.

- trailing only Coyotes managing partner Wayne Gretzky's 894 and Gordie Howe's 801. Hull, who turns 40 on Monday, has also scored 103 playoff goals, fourth behind Gretzky, Mark Messier and Jari Kurri.

"The truth is going to come forward when we get on the ice and see how this group comes together," Coyotes general manager Mike Barnett said. "But we needed to fill some imp./A46942-2004Aug6.txt010064400037510000032000000164551010504444300142250ustar00spudftpweb00001400350331 U.S. airlines and the Federal Aviation Administration failed to reach an agreement about voluntary flight cuts at Chicago's O'Hare International Airport and talks are expected to continue through next early week, FAA spokeswoman Laura Brown said. Federal officials asked carriers operating at O'Hare to cut back flights in order to curb record delays at the airport. The FAA threatened on Wednesday to impose a schedule with fewer flights if carriers did not volunteer to cut enough flights.

States Investigate Google Stock

Google's initial public offering may be postponed for a few weeks as California and other states' securities regulators investigate unregistered stock that the Internet search engine company issued. Google has said it may have broken laws in 18 states with the share grants to more than 1,000 employees and consultants between September 2001 and June 2004.

MORE NEWS

Adelphia Communications, the nation's fifth-largest cable television provider, said it has held preliminary talks with potential bidders and hopes to complete the discussions by the end of the year. Executives then will decide whether it will be best to sell all or part of the assets or emerge from bankruptcy as a stand-alone company, a spokesman said. Adelphia filed for bankruptcy protection two years ago after founder John J. Rigas and others were accused of looting the company and cheating investors out of billions of dollars. John Rigas and his son Timothy later were convicted of conspiracy, bank fraud and securities fraud.

Consumers stepped up their borrowing in June, though at a slower pace than seen during the previous month, the Federal Reserve reported. Consumer credit increased at a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 3.9 percent in June, or by $6.6 billion, from the previous month. That compared with a brisk 4.8 percent pace in May, an $8 billion rise. Total consumer credit outstanding is now a record $2.04 trillion. The Fed's report includes credit card debt and loans for such things as boats, cars and mobile homes, but not mortgages or home-equity loans.

Four former Halliburton employees, in a new filing in a class-action lawsuit, contend the oilfield-services giant engaged in systematic accounting fraud from 1998, when Dick Cheney ran the company, to 2001. Cheney, who left Halliburton in August 2000 to run for vice president, was not named as a defendant in the filing. The former finance employees say that Halliburton divisions routinely inflated their results by overstating amounts due from customers and understating money owed to vendors and that top executives hid Halliburton's vulnerability to asbestos claims. The charges in the filing go far beyond those outlined this week in a settlement of a civil lawsuit by the Securities and Exchange Commission, which called for Halliburton to pay $7.5 million for failing to disclose a change in accounting procedures in 1998.

University of Missouri officials said that if Enron founder Kenneth L. Lay is convicted of defrauding investors, they would prefer to remove his name from an economics professorship he endowed, which would probably require the return of his $1.1 million donation. Lay, a Missouri alumnus, was indicted last month on 11 criminal counts, including conspiracy, securities fraud and bank fraud, for his alleged role in the corporate scandal that brought down Enron. He has pleaded not guilty.

American Airlines will pay a $3 million civil penalty to resolve Justice Department concerns that it violated terms of a 1994 consent decree intended to promote airfare competition. The penalty was part of a settlement filed in U.S. District Court in Washington, the Justice Department announced. The department said American violated terms of the 1994 decree by publishing certain fares with increased advance purchase requirements only for future travel dates, rather than current travel. This effectively reduced American's risk of losing passengers to other airlines.

Roy E. Disney, a former director of Walt Disney Co., can't disclose company executives' compensation information to boost his campaign to oust chief executive Michael D. Eisner, a judge ruled. Delaware Chancery Court Judge Stephen P. Lamb ruled that the company didn't have to drop confidentiality restrictions on documents outlining how directors set Eisner's and other executives' pay over a two-year period starting in 2002. Roy Disney left the company board last year to lead a campaign to force Eisner to step down over claims that he'd mismanaged the world's No. 2 media company. Eisner resigned as chairman in March after he failed to win the support of 45 percent of the shares voted at the company's annual meeting, but retained his board seat and chief executive post.

Hollywood Entertainment shares fell as much as 25 percent after closely held Leonard Green & Partners said it couldn't obtain financing for its $888 million acquisition of the video retailer. Hollywood Entertainment said it will consider other options. Leonard Green cited "industry and market conditions" for failing to arrange financing. Video chains including larger rival Blockbuster have been hurt by competition from Wal-Mart Stores, video-on-demand services and Netflix's mail-order rentals.

RECALLS

Tyco International, the world's second-biggest maker of disposable medical products, recalled tubes used to open airways in patients with breathing difficulty, after the devices were associated with two deaths. The recall applies to all lots of 20 models of the Shiley TracheoSoft XLT Extended Length Tracheostomy Tube. Tyco has shipped 73,355 of the one-time-use tubes to hospitals and home-care facilities in the United States and Canada in the past four years, said Randy Krotz, a Tyco spokesman.

INTERNATIONAL

Parmalat Finanziaria, the Italian dairy company that is trying to recover from a fraud scandal, said it sued to recover about $350 million from Swiss bank UBS. Last week, it sued Citigroup.

South America's two largest economic blocs, Mercosur and the Andean Pact, agreed to sign a trade deal eliminating tariffs between the two regions. Negotiations between the two groups have been going on since 2001. The Mercosur trade bloc of Argentina, Uruguay, Paraguay and Brazil already includes Peru and Bolivia as associate members. The new accord would add Venezuela, Ecuador and Colombia to the trade area.

LOCAL BUSINESS

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit disbarred D.C. lawyer Lewis A. Rivlin for misappropriating client funds. A three- judge panel said that Rivlin, the ex-husband of former Federal Reserve official Alice Rivlin, could apply to be reinstated only after he had repaid his debts with interest.

EARNINGS

Berkshire Hathaway, the company run by billionaire Warren Buffett, said second-quarter profit fell 42 percent, to $1.28 billion, due to a decline in earnings from investments. Berkshire's investments include a major stake in the Washington Post Co.

Compiled from reports by the Associated Press, Bloomberg News, Dow Jones News Service and Washington Post staff writers.

./A47089-2004Aug7.txt010064400037510000032000000024651010505326600142300ustar00spudftpweb00001400350331BOSTON - Members of the union representing about 1,200 reporters, editors, photographers and sales people at The Boston Globe on Friday ratified a new five-year contract that guarantees wage increases and cuts health insurance costs.

The Boston Newspaper Guild, the newspaper's largest union, had been without a contract for 3 1/2 years.

The new contract is retroactive to Jan. 1, 2001, and lasts through the end of next year. Wages for the first four years will increase by a total of about 7.5 percent, similar to raises granted to members of other unions at the Globe, the newspaper and the union said.

Raises scheduled to take effect on Jan. 1 and July 1 next year amount to an increase of about 2.1 percent.

In exchange for more flexibility in subcontracting non-editorial union functions and other concessions, the newspaper increased its contributions to the Guild's health fund, reducing employees' weekly payroll contributions by almost 50 percent.

Under the settlement, the minimum wage for experienced Globe reporters will increase from $1,260 per week in 2000 to $1,387 per week by the second half of 2005. The average Guild full-time employee salary will be around $1,160 per week by the end of the new contract.

The Globe is a wholly owned subsidiary of The New York Times Co.

./A46943-2004Aug6.txt010064400037510000032000000020471010504444400142170ustar00spudftpweb00001400350331
COUNTRY INDEX CLOSE CHANGE
United States S&P 5001063.97 -- 1.55%
Canada S&P/TSX Composite8176.68 -- 1.10%
Brazil Sao Paulo Bovespa21,652.71+1.51%
Mexico Bolsa 9866.13 -- 1.99%
Argentina Merval 964.11 -- 0.99%
Britain FTSE 100 4337.90 -- 1.71%
France CAC 40 3528.64 -- 2.60%
Germany DAX Index 3727.74 -- 2.65%
Japan Nikkei 225 10,972.57 -- 0.80%
Hong Kong Hang Seng 12,478.68 -- 0.11%
South Korea Composite 733.95 -- 1.26%
Singapore Straits Times 1,922.75 -- 0.67%

./A47164-2004Aug7.txt010064400037510000032000000016641010506124100142120ustar00spudftpweb00001400350331Najaf Sees Worst Fighting Since Fall of Saddam; 300 Militants Killed in Two Days

AP Poll: Kerry Narrows Gap With Bush on Protecting the Country but Race Remains Tight

Information on Buildings in Terror Warning Had Been Accessed, Perhaps Updated, Official Says

AP Exclusive: Arrests Lead to a Web of Militancy Stretching From Pakistan to Britain to U.S.

Employment Growth Lethargic, With Just 32,000 New Jobs in July Three Months Before Election

3rd-Generation Yale Man Bush Tells Minority Journalists He Opposes 'Legacy' College Admissions

Soldier Testifies at England Hearing That 'Moral Call' Led Him to Expose Abuse at Abu Ghraib

Funk Legend Rick James, Best Known for 1981 Hit 'Super Freak,' Dies in Los Angeles at Age 56

New Deep-Sea Research Vessel Will Be Able to Carry People to 99 Percent of the Ocean Floor

Matsui Homers Twice, Drives in Six Runs As Yankees Rout Blue Jays 11-4

./A46944-2004Aug6.txt010064400037510000032000000035041010504444500142200ustar00spudftpweb00001400350331 Metrocall Holdings Inc., an Alexandria paging and wireless messaging company, earned $7.2 million ($1.24 per share) on $87.1 million in revenue during the second quarter, up from $6.4 million (64 cents) on $82.8 million in revenue during the second quarter last year. For the six months ended June 30, the company earned $14.7 million ($2.55) on $177.8 million in revenue, up from of $9.4 million (65 cents) on $170.2 million in revenue. Metrocall had $26.7 million in cash at the end of the second quarter. Shares of Metrocall closed at $64.40, down $1.40 or 2.1 percent.

• Aether Systems Inc., an Owings Mills wireless data company, lost $49.8 million ($1.14) on $12.4 million in revenue during the second quarter, compared with a loss of $14.7 million (35 cents) on $14.5 million in revenue in the second quarter of 2003. For the six months ended June 30, the company lost $40.7 million (93 cents) on $24.9 million in revenue, compared with a loss of $27.2 million (64 cents) on $29.3 million in revenue during the same period last year. The company took a $35.6 million charge (81 cents) during the second quarter. Shares of Aether Systems closed at $2.86, down 23 cents or 7.4 percent.

• TVI Corp., a Glenn Dale company that makes equipment for first responders, the military and public health agencies, earned $1.7 million (6 cents) on $10.2 million in revenue during the second quarter, up from $1.2 million (4 cents) on $6.8 million in revenue during the year-ago quarter. For the six months ended June 30, the company earned $3.4 million (11 cents) on $18.8 million in revenue, up from $2.4 million (8 cents) on $12.4 million in revenue during the same period last year. Shares of TVI closed up 3 cents at $4.10.

Compiled from reports by Washington Post staff writers.

./A49222-2004Aug8.txt010064400037510000032000000027141010533364400142160ustar00spudftpweb00001400350331BOCA RATON, Fla. - A church bus filled with teens was hit by an SUV and ran off the road, plunging into a canal and killing three people late Saturday, police said. One person was missing.

Florida Highway Patrol Lt. Roger Reyes said the bus carrying 25 people from First Baptist Church at Hillsboro in Coconut Creek was returning from an Orlando-area theme park when the accident happened.

Reyes said a Ford Explorer had a blowout and hit the bus, running it off the road and through a fence into a canal at about 10 p.m. The bus was completely submerged in about 16 feet of water, and divers were still in the water early Sunday searching for the missing person, he said.

A Broward County Sheriff's office deputy and passers-by jumped in the canal to pull people out immediately after the accident, Reyes said.

"There were 10 kids standing on the roof (of the bus) saying: 'Help us, help us,'" Laura Doan of Davie, one of the first people at the scene, told the South Florida Sun-Sentinel.

Sylvia Williamson, wife of the Rev. Jerry Williamson, the church pastor, told the newspaper most of the teens on the bus were from the church youth group, in grades 7 to 12.

The ages and identities of those killed and injured were not released. The injured were taken to three area hospitals.

"I was asleep," 13-year-old Christopher Thomas told The Palm Beach Post. "I heard a bump, we swerved, water came rushing in the window and I swam out."

./A46945-2004Aug6.txt010064400037510000032000000043521010504444500142230ustar00spudftpweb00001400350331The District's best-known destination for independent home furnishings stores just got a new tenant: a national furniture chain.

Storehouse Inc., purveyor of trendy but mid-priced couches and lamps, yesterday said it will build its first District store on 14th Street NW in the heart of the city's boutique home furnishing district.

Nearly a dozen furniture stores, such as chic housewares seller Home Rule Inc. and hip furniture vendor Muleh, have opened along 14th Street NW in the District during the past five years, helping lead the commercial rebirth of the corridor.

Now the gentrification they spearheaded has begun to attract national chains, store owners said. "Chains are never the first one to go into an exciting area, but once they do, there is a sense that it has arrived," said Muleh owner Christopher Reiter.

John Asadoorian, the broker who represented the property owner in negotiations, said the arrival of a national furniture chain in the neighborhood is "somewhat inevitable." The neighborhood already has attracted a Whole Foods supermarket, a Starbucks and a CVS pharmacy.

The 8,000-square-foot store, which is to occupy a former Cadillac showroom, is expected to open this fall, Asadoorian said.

Storehouse sells a variety of home furnishings, from $1,000 beds to $25 sets of flatware. The 35-year-old chain, which operates in more than a dozen states, has 60 stores nationwide, including 11 in the Washington area.

Furniture store owners on 14th Street NW said the chain's broad lineup posed little competitive threat to their businesses, which are more focused on niche products and design themes.

Jason Claire, co-owner of the 18-month-old contemporary furniture store Vastu, said the chain is likely to attract more foot traffic to the street and improve business for boutique stores.

"A store like that is spending money on national advertising," he said. "That is good for all of us."

Christopher Walsh, co-owner of Maison 14, which opened two years ago, predicted there will be little overlap when it comes to merchandise. Maison 14 specializes in modern furniture and French antiques.

"Each of the furniture stores on 14th are pretty different," he said.

./A47092-2004Aug7.txt010064400037510000032000000053211010505422200142050ustar00spudftpweb00001400350331 NEW YORK (Reuters) - Albert Pujols had three hits and drove in the go-ahead run in the seventh inning as the Cardinals, who acquired Larry Walker during the game, defeated the New York Mets 6-4 in St Louis Friday.

Pujols added two RBI and also scored a run for the Cardinals, who announced they had picked up the veteran slugging outfielder from the Colorado Rockies in the seventh inning.

St Louis has won 14 of its last 18 games and now adds Walker to its already potent offense.

The Cards lead the NL with a .280 batting average and have the best record in the major leagues at 70-38.

The Rockies received Class-A closer Jason Burch and two players to be named for Walker, a three-time NL batting champion.

Matt Morris (12-7) allowed two runs on five hits over seven innings, with three strikeouts and two walks.

Jason Isringhausen got two outs for his 29th save.

So Taguchi had two hits and drove in a run for the Cardinals.

Tom Glavine (8-10) allowed four runs -- three earned -- on eight hits over 7 1/3 innings to take the loss.

Mike Cameron, Richard Hidalgo and Cliff Floyd all homered for the Mets, who saw their three-game winning streak snapped.

In other games, Paul Lo Duca hit a two-run single in the bottom of the ninth inning to rally the Florida Marlins to a 7-6 win over the Milwaukee Brewers.

Billy Koch (1-2) pitched a perfect ninth for the win. Juan Pierre had two hits, scored two runs and drove in another two for the Marlins.

Dan Kolb (0-2) didn't get an out in the ninth and blew just his second save in 32 opportunities, ending a streak of 17 saves in a row. Ben Grieve homered for the Brewers.

In Houston, Roy Oswalt pitched a five-hit shutout as the Astros blanked the Montreal Expos 4-0.

Oswalt (12-8) struck out eight and walked one for his second shutout of the season and third of his career.

Jeff Bagwell and Jeff Kent both drove in two runs for Houston, who lost Adam Everett with a broken bone in his left wrist.

Rocky Biddle (3-6) left the game after taking a line drive off his ankle in the third inning.

He allowed two runs on three hits in 2 2/3 innings.

Todd Helton and Todd Greene both homered as the Colorado Rockies beat the Cincinnati Reds 8-5.

Vinny Castilla added three hits and an RBI for Colorado, while Preston Wilson had two hits and two RBI.

Shawn Estes (12-4) allowed five runs on eight hits in 6 1/3 innings for the win and Shawn Chacon pitched the ninth for his 26th save.

Adam Dunn, Willy Mo Pena and Felipe Lopez all homered for the Reds.

Brandon Claussen (1-2) allowed six runs -- five earned -- on eight hits over 6 1/3 innings for the loss.

./A46946-2004Aug6.txt010064400037510000032000000024741010504342500142240ustar00spudftpweb00001400350331Three people are in custody and charged in connection with 30 home burglaries in the Waldorf area since May, the Charles County Sheriff's Office announced last week.

Adrian Dishon Bell, 18, of Waldorf and two 17-year-old male youths, one from Waldorf and the other from Huntingtown, were arrested July 24 after a single-vehicle crash on Piney Church Road in Waldorf.

Police said the three were in a 2003 Hyundai sport-utility vehicle that ran off the road when negotiating a turn and struck a tree. Bell and the two juveniles attempted to flee from the crash but were soon picked up by police.

When officers determined that the SUV had been stolen the night before during a burglary in the Pinefield subdivision, they arrested the three on auto theft charges.

Investigators said other evidence obtained as a result of the crash linked the three to a rash of other burglaries that have occurred over the summer in the Pinefield and St. Charles areas of Waldorf. All three were charged with multiple counts of first degree burglary, theft, conspiracy to commit theft and malicious destruction of property.

Bell, charged as an adult, is being held at the Charles County Detention Center in La Plata. The 17-year-olds, charged as juveniles, were taken to the Cheltenham Youth Facility.

./A46947-2004Aug6.txt010064400037510000032000000144001010504342700142170ustar00spudftpweb00001400350331As the national political season heats up, so too will the political activities of Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., who has always been a loyal soldier in the GOP army.

Ehrlich has been in regular contact with President Bush's campaign manager, Ken Mehlman, and was advised last week to block out a significant stretch of time for campaigning in mid-October.

The governor has not been given a specific assignment but said Monday that he expects it will involve a combination of stumping with the president and speaking in key swing states on his behalf.

Although Ehrlich's role will be prominent, it will in all likelihood continue to seem modest when compared with that of Lt. Gov. Michael S. Steele. Campaigning for the president has taken Steele to Miami and Cleveland, and he recently snagged a prime speaking role at the Republican National Convention.

Ehrlich said Monday that he might have enjoyed speaking at the big event in Manhattan but agrees that Steele is a more appropriate choice under the circumstances. "And you're not going to have two of us speaking from Maryland," he said.

Steele helps Republicans show the nation that the party has a place for upwardly mobile African American business executives, Ehrlich said.

Stumping for Duncan

The Democratic National Convention had its own Maryland subplot -- this one involving the 2006 primary for governor. For members of the state's congressional delegation, the convention seemed to present an opportunity to promote a candidate for governor.

For some, that meant gushing about the attributes of Montgomery County Executive Douglas M. Duncan, while others showered attention and praise on Baltimore Mayor Martin O'Malley -- the two likely contenders for the Democratic nomination.

O'Malley, who spoke to the convention July 28, received the bulk of the media attention in Boston, but suburban Washington congressmen Albert R. Wynn and Chris Van Hollen made sure to talk up Duncan to party activists.

At a breakfast meeting of Maryland delegates July 29, Van Hollen, who represents much of Montgomery County and a slice of Prince George's, told the crowd that Duncan stands for Democratic values. "He really has made sure every part of Montgomery and parts of the state have benefited from what we in the Democratic Party believe in," Van Hollen said.

Wynn, whose district includes parts of Prince George's and Montgomery counties, went even further. "I want to thank you for being the backbone of the Maryland Democratic Party," said Wynn, who is supporting Duncan over O'Malley.

"The rubber is hitting the road in terms of education thanks to Doug Duncan," Wynn continued.

Then, with O'Malley sitting a few yards away, Wynn referred to Duncan as "Governor Duncan."

"I'm sorry, County Executive Duncan," Wynn said, smiling.

O'Malley did not look pleased. But the Baltimore mayor has his own boosters. Rep. C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger -- who represents parts of Baltimore and Anne Arundel, Baltimore and Harford counties -- said he thinks O'Malley is unbeatable should he choose to run.

"No one lights up a room like Martin does," Ruppersberger said.

Del. Kullen Sworn In

Democrat P. Sue Kullen was sworn in Wednesday as the successor to George W. Owings III in the Maryland House of Delegates, making her the first woman to represent Calvert County in the General Assembly.

Kullen was appointed last month by Ehrlich to replace Owings, who has joined the administration to run the Department of Veterans Affairs. The appointment came after Kullen's nomination by the Calvert County Democratic Central Committee.

Kullen had never held major elective office but emerged as a compromise candidate when members of the Central Committee deadlocked in deciding the nomination. In selecting Kullen, the Central Committee passed over more experienced candidates, such as Hagner R. Mister of Prince Frederick, a former state agriculture secretary and a former president of the county commissioners; Barbara A. Stinnett, a former county commissioner from Owings; and Thomas M. Pelagatti, a Prince Frederick lawyer who is a former judge of the Orphans' Court in Calvert County.

Democrats had wanted Owings's replacement to be a strong candidate to retain the seat in the 2006 election. Owings ran unopposed in 2002. However, Republicans are expected to target the seat in 2006, with Calvert County Board of Commissioners President David F. Hale (R-Owings) being promoted as a possible GOP candidate.

Kullen, 44, has served 10 years as a governor's appointee on the Maryland Developmental Disabilities Planning Council. She has vowed to run in 2006 as the incumbent -- and not let down the party faithful. Kullen recently set up her campaign finance committee and, for the first time, will be raising funds for a political campaign.

Mikulski Steers Rural Roads

U.S. Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski (D-Md.) has always surprised the political pundits with her ability to win over rural voters despite her support for gun control regulations and abortion rights. Mikulski won every county in Maryland except Garrett, which is sparsely populated and heavily Republican, during her last two election campaigns.

But with a popular Republican governor in Annapolis, a Republican president at the top of the ticket and a better funded challenger this year, her campaign strategists privately say they expect her to be less successful in Maryland's rural counties this year.

Even so, Mikulski appears unwilling to concede those voters. The three-term senator was one of the few speakers at Maryland delegation meetings to urge party officials to reach out to more conservative parts of the state.

"We cannot give up on the red counties," Mikulski said, referring to those counties that voted for Ehrlich in 2002. "We cannot give up on the rural counties."

Staff writer Ray McCaffrey contributed to this report.

./A46948-2004Aug6.txt010064400037510000032000000320411010504343000142130ustar00spudftpweb00001400350331 The following home sales were recently recorded in Calvert, Charles and St. Mary's counties and supplied to The Washington Post by Spatial Systems Associates Inc., the Maryland Office of Assessments and Taxation and the Maryland Office of Planning. To find sale and assessment records for homes in Southern Maryland and other Washington areas, visit www.washingtonpost.com/realestate.

Calvert County

Chesapeake Beach Area

C ST., 7831-Bernard E. Gibson to Kathryn L. and Jeffrey L. Miller, $289,999.

Dunkirk Area

CORTLAND LANE, 9610-John O. and Joni A. Baldwin to Barbara M. and Michael J. Martin, $294,000.

CROWN DR., 11903-Joseph P. and Lenora Davis to Mary G. and Gary C. Spangler, $415,000.

LAKESIDE CT., 3911-Timothy J. and Toni L. Brown to Michelle R. and Jeffrey R. Hamilton, $350,000.

WHITE OAK CT., 12465-Peter S. and Margaret L. Alex to Michele M. and Kenneth A. Leadbeter, $480,000.

YELLOW BANK RD., 3485-Charlotte Wilkening to Lynn M. Panholzer, $201,000.

Lusby Area

BIG SANDY RUN, 11610-William A. and Leslie G. Dalrymple to Jennifer L. Hannon and Charles A. Murphy, $153,000.

CALVERT BLVD., 3168-John Woodrow Henley to Kimberly S. and Eric P. Zabiegalski, $290,500.

CARDINAL CIR., 8082-Patrick J. Cosgrove to Terria and James Williams, $196,000.

CATALINA DR., 12250-John T. Jensen to Michael Hawkins, $185,000.

CEDAR LANE, 8321-William E. Deavers Jr. to Heather Lowe, $165,000.

CHISHOLM TRAIL, 512-Curtis M. Gantt to Lawrence Edward III and Lawrence Wilson Jr., $118,000.

COTTONWOOD CT., 11967-Catherine Maria and John B. Darling to Scot Napoletano, $235,000.

LAUREL DR., 327-Janet King to Nicholas Scali, $147,200.

MAPLE WAY, 559-Jacinda Henderson to Mufarreh Maaitah, $150,000.

PLATTE RD., 540-Melanie L. MacCubbin to Gwyneth A. Blattau Gay and Christopher D. Gay, $195,000.

PUEBLO CT., 12029-Michael A. Fenner to Courtney L. Crooks and Kenneth P. Taylor, $196,000.

ROPEKNOT RD., 11580-Jeremy C. Jones to Jessica J. and Russell E. German, $163,500.

THUNDERBIRD DR., 163-Bethany D. and James C. Prebble Jr. to Charles Gibbons, $154,000.

WHITE ROCK RD., 670-John Jeffrey Milner to Ruth Pittman, $145,000.

North Beach Area

CHESAPEAKE LIGHTHOUSE DR., 8598-Elaine A. Heiston to Grace and Jovenal Juanillo, $165,000.

SEA BREAM CT., 3941-Jennifer Short to Lisa M. Roberts and Shannon L. Welch, $189,900.

SEA OAT CT., 9360-Barbara G. Hill to Jospeh A. Milby, $180,000.

Prince Frederick Area

CENTRAL DR., 74-Vashti Wilkerson Smith to Bonnie Hobbs, $121,000.

FAWN LANE, 2515-Bonita A. and Robert W. Zook to Nancy L. Murphy, $310,000.

Solomons Area

RUNABOUT LOOP, 506-Thomas R. Manning Jr. to Kimberly W. Siner and Priscilla S. Lankenau, $190,000.

St. Leonard Area

MACKALL RD., 6820-Howard L. and Debra A. Horsmon to Kimberly H. Horsmon and Phillip L. Long Sr., $190,000.

WALNUT RD., 1606-Thomas W. Stahl Sr. to Jennifer L. Stewart Patterson and Mark A. Patterson, $145,000.

Charles County

Bryans Road Area

CHARLENE CT., 6768-Kevin Kidd to Bongiwe Kulu, $183,500.

Hughesville- Prince Frederick Road Area

BUCKEYE DR., 6818-Charles R. and Maria B. Arnold to Carmen C. and Larry T. Walker, $449,000.

Indian Head Area

CHINABERRY LANE, 8-Hector Jr. and Linda D. Musa to Riley J. and Reginia L. Beard, $109,000.

DOVETREE CT., 14-Debra A. and Tony R. Malbrough to Angela R. Doores, $120,000.

MEADOWSIDE CT., 9-Peggy Jo Berthod to Samuel Lartey, $128,000.

RIVERSIDE RUN DR., 113-Marcy and Jason Jackson to Denise A. Dawkins, $105,000.

Issue Area

LORD BALTIMORE DR., 11140-Mary L. and Charles P. Erwin, trustees, to Jody C. Hursh, $324,000.

WOLLASTON CIR., 11687-Mil Mar and Sons Builders Inc. to Robert L. and Antoinette E. Creighton, $320,200.

WOLLASTON CIR., 11777-Gerald M. Smith to James R. Pinto, $334,500.

La Plata Area

CARMELITE DR., 5250-Irmina A. Stephens to Cynthia Hoidra and Jason J. Mullikin, $264,000.

EVESHAM PL., 8420-Fallon Homes Inc. to Dianna P. and Keven Turner, $558,000.

FREDERICK DR., 326-Debra A. Gragg to Karen Milstead, $116,000.

GILBERT LANE, 11635-Diane L. Hartzel to Laura A. and Russell A. Dyson, $370,000.

GLEN ALBIN RD., 6725-Howard M. Norris III, trustee, to Joni E. and James E. Boone, $100,000.

MANOR CT., 12180-Rebecca F. and Robert M. Downie to Jeffery C. Delph, $419,900.

WOOD DUCK CIR., 109-Kelli D. McGhee to Carrie L. Wright, $150,000.

Port Tobacco Area

SHIRLEY BLVD., 7419-Helen D. and Michael Kuklish to William R. Stafford, $212,245.

St. Charles Area

BRIGHTWELL CT., 1729-Kristina A. and David A. Hoyle to Jaime M. Humphrey, $121,000.

HEATHCOTE RD., 3029-Kristian Telfaire to Tracy F. Chesley, $103,020.

JAMESON DR., 12933-Turner A. and Mary E. Edelen to Chrystal L. and Ryan D. Willis, $213,000.

KEEPSAKE PL., 38-Kristine L. and John R. Bennett to Jennifer R. Wilkinson, $135,800.

KEMPSFORD FIELD PL., 3675-Nicole and David M. Herrington to Christopher Hennen, $132,000.

MARIGOLD PL., 3465-Gail M. and John L. Strieter to Oscar A. Umanzor, $175,000.

OLD BAILEY CT., 2249-Greater Suburban Properties Inc. to Robert Adams, $229,000.

ROXBURY CT., 823-Arden C. Prather to T. Wise Powell and James W. Powell Sr., $255,000.

RUSTON PL., 4502, No. 42-KR-Michael A. and Kathleen F. Standridge to Walter McClure and Donald B. Bobrow, $84,210.

Waldorf Area

ALBERMARLE PL., 2720-Valerie London to Shelina Dhanani, $175,000.

BAR OAK DR., 12720-Charles D. and Crystal A. Sparks to Bridget D. and James A. Dell, $240,000.

BEL AIRE CT., 11203-Tracie R. and Timothy D. Johnson to Leroy M. White Jr., $280,000.

BREWSTER CIR., 3814-Layne E. Leoffler Jr. to Kristine L. and John R. Bennett, $209,900.

CARIBOU CT., 6906-Kim E. Lefevre to Russell Owens, $176,000.

DEERWOOD CT., 6209-Alan M. De Ramos to Rebecca J. and Brian J. Cummings, $168,000.

HERON PL., 11212-Ernestine B. Evans to Gerald R. Marosek, $212,500.

LELAND PL., 11525-Revel W. and Brian H. Battle to Shamima Begum, $215,000.

MUSKRAT CT., 6606-Naomi Anokye to Bany and Michael A. Theriault, $231,000.

PIERCE RD., 12047-Lisa M. and James P. Binns to Christopher A. Aleshire, $226,600.

QUIGLEY CT., 4202-Judith S. Farrall to Tracy A. and Thomas W. Dennis Jr., $85,000.

RAY CT., 5306-John F. Neely to Gail A. Curtis, $284,900.

REDHORSE CT., 5010-Dondi V. Cabbell to James B. Jr. and Eleanor J. Knowles, $243,662.

SEWICKLEY ST., 11217-Barbara E. and Andrew Tiernan to William L. Powell Jr., $210,000.

SILVERLEAF ST., 8800-Dorothy M. Kirkland to Lisa D. Silver, $287,000.

SIRENIA PL., 6074-Stephen E. and Toni M. Kruszka to Patricia E. and B. Matthew Texier, $155,000.

SPRINGFISH PL., 5703-Steven C. Lobianco Sr. to Christi L. Vaccaro, $165,000.

STELLA CT., 10987-John H. Jr. and Barbara A. Smith Bean to Dominique R. and Charles E. Stewart, $285,000.

WESTWOOD DR., 2295-Charles M. and Rosemary M. Sauls to Rory C. and Velna L. Bullock, $295,000.

WINTERGREEN PL., 3931-Gail A. Curtis to Buddy E. Smallwood Jr., $144,500.

Welcome Area

WEDDING DR., 8605-Theresa Yingling and Robert Fulcher to Grant A. Crosswell, $329,900.

St. Mary's County

Bushwood Area

HILLTOP DR., 23101-Robert L. Edwards to Ra Uhl Enterprises Inc., $16,000.

California Area

BIRCH WAY, 44633-Patric R. and Laura L. Roesch to Bridgett and James B. Sylvia, $275,000.

LOCUST RIDGE CT., 44790, No. 6B-Rod F. Esquivel to David A. Russell, $97,000.

SPRINGSTEEN CT. N., 45813-Leslie H. Taylor to Richard Joseph Hofer, $122,000.

Charlotte Hall Area

MOUNT WOLF WAY, 30508-Joseph A. and Ann H. Fowler to Marnie I. and Brian L. Grove, $125,000.

Clements Area

ST. WINIFRED'S LANE, 22729-Edward Dyer Middleton to Diana Lee and Jesse Wayne Rollins, $250,000.

Coltons Point Area

WATERLOO LANE, 20495-Joseph M. Dudczak trust to Rebekah E. and Ellis T. Nottingham, $389,000.

Dameron Area

FORD'S LANE, 49381-Smith G. Simpson to Tracy A. and Jeffery W. Pennington, $201,000.

Great Mills Area

ATHLONE DR., 22650-Bennie Tucker Jr. to Na Young Kim and Se Jong Ju, $230,000.

KNOCKEYON LANE, 45503-Adam A. Terio to Jennifer and Dennis R. Mercer, $137,500.

POPPYS WAY, 20605-John Raymond Shoemaker to Mary Catherine Hobbs and Teddy Lee Clark, $142,500.

RAGGEDY LANE, 45930-David G. Orwig to Kimberly A. and Michael R. Westman, $110,000.

ST. ELIZABETH'S CT., 22056-Shaun A. Elliott to Michael A. Brooks, $130,000.

ST. GABRIEL'S CIR., 22069-Dana and Nicholas B. Goldstein to Jacqueline S. Kernan, $137,000.

Hollywood Area

JOY CHAPEL RD., 44609-David R. and Alyce McGuffie to Myra L. McGuffie and John J. Milner, $310,000.

Leonardtown Area

HOLLYWOOD RD., 23700-Tacair Engineering Corp. to Bennett Homes Corp., $156,000.

HUNGERFORD CT., 42924-Quality Built Homes Inc. to La Barbara and Thomas J. Ridley Jr., $301,883.

POINT LOOKOUT RD., 22575-Alfred S. Mattingly to Margaret E. and James D. Cryer Sr., $112,000.

SASSAFRAS LANE, 39921-St. Clements Woods Partnership to Lisa L. and Daniel L. Quade, $129,990.

WOODMERE DR., 20986-Richard J. Keiter to Kathryn M. and Raymond A. Fairgrieve, $294,000.

WOODMERE DR., 21060-Kelly L. and Deandra L. Dickson to Jacqueline A. and Joseph B. Hornbuckle, $325,000.

Lexington Park Area

CARMEN WOODS DR., 21389-Donald Dale Stombaugh to Robin Johnson, $202,000.

ESSEX DR. S., 21526-George Haliscak to D.A. Stewart, $183,000.

MAINSAIL DR., 21658-Robert S. Mravec to Walter B. Massenburg Jr., $285,000.

MANON WAY, 21406-Gary McCoy to Rita D. and John D. Smith, $118,000.

OXFORD DR., 21567-Laurence Millison to Gregory A. and Kimberly S. Carroll, $90,000.

SCHWARTZKOPF DR., 47197-Lisa M. and Peter J. Sudol to Timothy Joseph Feeney, $200,000.

Mechanicsville Area

ALLISON CIR., 29668-Six Wix Inc. to Serious Bidness Inc., $185,000.

BEACH DR., 40359-Don W. Reb to Sonya M. and Gregory J. Carpenter, $385,000.

DOGWOOD CIR., 29513-Alan W. Moore to James Hooper and Suzanne Zantzinger, $120,000.

EDINBOROUGH DR., 30020-Robert L. Murphy to Amanda Keyes, $205,000.

LIVING WATER LANE, 41144-Joseph Allen Jr. and Angela R. Gass to Gina M. and John L. Cardova Jr., $500,000.

MANOR DR., 42376-Israel Z. Swarey to Thomas Eugene Copsey, $62,000.

RICHARD CIR., 29918-Jammie L. and Jason E. Dobson to Daniel Jones, $184,500.

TANYARD DR., 37296-Donald C. Harmon II to Sherrylynn and Richard Lewallen, $208,000.

VALLEY DR., 42114-Christopher N. Hare to Keith R. Collier, $172,000.

WIDOW LANE, 27065-Kathleen J. Lyon to Betty J. Dyson, $279,000.

./A46949-2004Aug6.txt010064400037510000032000000024741010504343200142250ustar00spudftpweb00001400350331The following deaths were reported by funeral homes in Southern Maryland.

Calvert County

CLARKE, Linda Swain, 91, of St. Leonard, homemaker, died July 20 at Calvert County Nursing Center.

OSBORNE, Robert Ray, 83, of Lusby, painter, died Aug. 5 at Calvert Memorial Hospital.

REID, Stewart E., 86, of Lusby, retired Navy chief petty officer, died July 17 at National Naval Medical Center in Bethesda.

YOUNG, Jack, 75, of Prince Frederick, assistant superintendent with SMECO, died July 24 at Calvert Memorial Hospital.

Charles County

HOOPER, Timothy Joseph, 67, of La Plata, lawyer, died July 30 at his home.

NORRIS, Cecelia Margaret, 86, of La Plata, homemaker, died July 31 at the Charles County Nursing and Rehabilitation Center.

St. Mary's County

DENARO, Joseph Gerard, 25, of Dameron, utility linesman, died Aug. 2 in Dameron.

KOEHLER, Catherine Leah, 75, of Piney Point, homemaker, died Aug. 2 in Piney Point.

WARDELL, Donna Marie, 67, of Lexington Park, federal government employee, died July 31 in Leonardtown.

-- Compiled by SUSAN BARTON

alvert Memorial Hospital.

REID, Stewart E., 86, of Lusby, retired Navy chief petty officer, died July 17 at National Naval Medical Center in Bethesda.

YOU./A46950-2004Aug6.txt010064400037510000032000000157361010507767400142410ustar00spudftpweb00001400350331 THE REGION

PandaMania Inspires Photo Contest

The brightly colored panda statues on scores of Washington streets will star in a citywide photo shoot during the next month.

The D.C. Commission on the Arts and Humanities, which runs the PandaMania public art exhibit, is launching a contest for the best photographs of the five-foot-tall statues, which will be auctioned off Oct. 9 to raise money for arts programming.

Photos can be entered in three categories: "Separated at Birth" (a picture of a panda and person who closely resemble each other), "Cutest" and "Most Creative," the arts commission said. Submissions from photographers ages 6 to 12 will be judged separately.

Sponsors include the commission, the National Zoo and Fuji Film, a major supporter of the zoo's live panda exhibit. Contest entry forms are available online at www.fonz.org, dcarts.dc.gov and pandas.fujifilm.com. They are to be available at the zoo and at some panda sculptures starting next week.

Since their May unveiling, the 150 panda statues have been popular with camera-toters. At least 18 have been vandalized or defaced. One was reported stolen last week.

THE DISTRICT

Discussions on New Treatment for Water

Two public meetings have been scheduled this month in which city and federal officials will answer residents' questions about a new chemical treatment to all D.C. drinking water beginning Aug. 23 intended to reduce widespread high levels of lead.

The chemical, an orthophosphate, is widely used elsewhere and has been tried since June in a section of upper Northwest. Environmental Protection Agency officials approved citywide use this week, saying no problems were experienced.

The first meeting will be Aug. 19 in the basement of Congress Heights United Methodist Church, 421 Alabama Ave. SE. The second will be Aug. 24 in meeting room A-5 of the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library, 901 G St. NW. Both meetings will hold an open house from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m., with a formal presentation followed by a question-and-answer session from 7:30 to 8:30 p.m.

Top Superintendent Candidate Interviewed

Maurice A. Jones, the 39-year-old Virginia state official who has become a top candidate for the city's school superintendent job, was interviewed yesterday by a search committee that includes high-ranking city and school officials and parent and union representatives.

Jones, a lawyer who has headed the Virginia Department of Social Services since 2002, was first interviewed Monday by Mayor Anthony A. Williams (D), D.C. Council Chairman Linda W. Cropp (D), Board of Education President Peggy Cooper Cafritz and others on a panel that is to recommend a candidate to the board. The panel's seven members sit on the search committee. Some of the other search committee members had said they felt slighted not being consulted earlier.

Committee members said they made no decision yesterday and plan to meet Monday.

VIRGINIA

Highland Company Proposes Wind Farms

A company based in Highland County wants to build 20 wind turbines on two ridges in the mountainous region.

Supporters of wind power say the ridges in Highland, west of Harrisonburg, are ideal because some of the strongest winds on the East Coast blow there and the county has a sparse population -- less than 2,500 people, according to the Census Bureau.

Opposition has arisen to the plans of the company, New Highland Wind, since three test turbines were installed in the past five years. Carolyn Pohowsky, executive director of the Highland County Chamber of Commerce, said the wind farms will hurt the growing tourism industry. Some residents say that the wind farms will spoil views and kill migratory birds.

The proposal must be approved by the boards of zoning appeals and supervisors, then the State Corporation Commission.

Surprise Drops In on Pr. William Resident

A Prince William County resident was startled earlier this week when a strange object dropped into her home.

A police spokesman said the five- to eight-pound cylindrical object crashed through the roof and ceiling of the Bristow home on Tuesday. No one was injured.

Police said they first checked with the Federal Aviation Administration to see if it came from an airplane. But then they learned that the source: A cable broke on an industrial Dumpster, flinging a part into the air.

Professor Leaving Over Anti-Gay Law

A biology professor at Virginia Tech University in Blacksburg said she quit her job recently because of a new state law restricting the rights of same-sex couples.

In a letter to Virginia Tech President Charles W. Steger, Lynn Adler said she will leave the university to take a position with the University of Massachusetts at Amherst this fall.

She said she is "sad and sorry" to be leaving the school but felt the state's laws make it difficult for her to have a long-term future in the state. Her partner, who works part time at the school, does not have health insurance, and the state will not recognize them both as parents if they decide to have children, she said.

Adler said she decided to leave because of a law enacted this year prohibiting contracts between same-sex couples that purport to bestow the obligations of marriage. Many gay Virginians have threatened to leave the state in response to the law, considered by some to be the harshest anti-gay measure in the country.

MARYLAND

Strengthening Sewage Overflow Alerts

A state agency is proposing regulations that describe specific information that must be provided to the public and local officials after a significant sewage overflow. The regulations would cover the state's roughly 350 wastewater treatment facilities.

"These regulations will strengthen our effort to ensure that all concerned parties are properly informed about sewage overflows," said Environment Secretary Kendl P. Philbrick.

The Maryland Department of the Environment began requiring reports of all sewage overflows through a directive issued in October 2000. The department and local health directors developed a joint guidance document for public notification decisions in January 2001.

The proposed regulations also address notifications to the public by the owner or operator of a sewer system or treatment plant.

QUOTE OF THE DAY

"I can tell you I've never felt so close to death in my life."

-- Beverly Sjoblad, a customer at a Hyattsville bank, after she and another woman fled through a rear exit when they heard gunfire in front of the bank, where gunmen had ambushed an armored car courier. -- Page B1

Compiled from reports by staff writers D'Vera Cohn , Sewell Chan, Martin Weil and Debbi Wilgoren and the Associated Press.

./A46951-2004Aug6.txt010064400037510000032000000037651010507767400142410ustar00spudftpweb00001400350331A 17-year-old construction worker died and a co-worker was critically injured yesterday after they fell 60 feet off a building under renovation in Northwest Washington, authorities said.

Investigators said that one worker grabbed the other as he fell. Both then tumbled to an alley. Rescue workers found them lying next to each other.

Elkin Galdames of Baltimore suffered massive injuries and died at the scene. Officials said that his co-worker, Freddy Madrid of Baltimore, was taken to Washington Hospital Center. Madrid's age was not released. Both men were from Honduras, a co-worker said.

Fire and police officials said the accident occurred after Galdames and Madrid put a plank of scaffolding into place about 11:30 a.m. atop the Dunbar Theatre in the 600 block of T Street NW, in the area once known as Black Broadway.

When they stepped on the board, it gave out, officials said. As Galdames fell, Madrid grabbed him, fire officials said, and probably survived because he landed on the 17-year-old.

Police officials said the men were wearing safety harnesses. They said they were investigating whether the harnesses were attached to the building or scaffolding.

At least one other construction worker told police that the safety harnesses had been attached to the scaffolding, D.C. police Lt. Robert Neal said.

An investigator with the Occupational Safety and Health Administration was at the scene yesterday afternoon but would not comment.

"Clearly, safety equipment was available," said Alan Etter, spokesman for the D.C. Fire and Emergency Medical Services Department. "Whether it was being used or not is what OSHA and police will try to figure out."

Michael Kenneler of Brand Scaffold, which made the equipment involved in yesterday's accident, said he did not know why the plank gave out.

Police cordoned off the area with yellow police tape, and investigators were interviewing witnesses yesterday afternoon as a dozen bystanders watched.

to Washingt./A47090-2004Aug7.txt010064400037510000032000000011021010505354600142040ustar00spudftpweb00001400350331BAGHDAD, Iraq - Assailants in Iraq killed three U.S. servicemen, one in the capital and two in the south of the troubled country, the U.S. command said Saturday.

Two Marines from the 11th Marine Expeditionary Unit were killed on Friday "as a result of enemy action" in Najaf province, south of the capital, the military said in a statement.

In western Baghdad, an insurgent fired a rocket-propelled grenade at a patrolling U.S. vehicle, killing one soldier, the military said.

The names of those killed were withheld pending notification of next of kin.

./A47302-2004Aug7.txt010064400037510000032000000001631010507743400142100ustar00spudftpweb00001400350331 INSIDE: Crowding Into the Inova Fairfax ER Page F2 Elusive Adulthood Page F3 Quick Study Page F6

./A47585-2004Aug7.txt010064400037510000032000000115401010512543700142230ustar00spudftpweb00001400350331Sporadic Gunfire After Fierce Najaf Fight

NAJAF, Iraq (AP) - Sporadic explosions and gunfire echoed through this holy Shiite city on Saturday after two days of intense clashes between U.S. forces and Shiite Muslim insurgents that marked some of the bloodiest fighting in Iraq in months and killed up to 300 people. A 24-hour government deadline for the militants to leave Najaf expired Saturday without any sign of a pullout - or any major attack. The city was the quietest it's been since fighting erupted Thursday between American troops and militants loyal to Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr and spread to several cities across Iraq including the capital.

American Beheaded in Islamic Online Video

CAIRO, Egypt (AP) - New video aired Saturday purportedly shows a San Francisco man beheaded moments after he urges the United States to end its occupation. The man on the tape identified himself as what sounds like Benjamin Vanderford, from San Francisco. He sat on a chair in a dark room, his hands behind his back, trembling and rocking back and forth.

AP Poll: Kerry Narrows Security Issue Gap

WASHINGTON (AP) - Democrat John Kerry is putting the pressure on President Bush on his strongest issue, national defense, but the incumbent retains an advantage there, an Associated Press poll found. The Democratic National Convention in late July focused heavily on Kerry's war service and on national security, a strategy that appears to be paying dividends for the White House challenger.

AP: Arrests Damage al-Qaida Network

ISLAMABAD, Pakistan (AP) - The trail began with a hunt for the people who ambushed a Pakistani commander as his motorcade tried to cross Karachi's Clifton Bridge in June. It led to a torrent of intelligence and ended with dozens of arrests in Pakistan and Britain and a terror warning in the United States. Along the way, investigators passed through Karachi's teeming streets, to the dusty tribal village of Shakai along the Pakistan-Afghan border, to seemingly placid suburban London, to the world's financial headquarters in New York and to Washington, D.C.

Terror Threat Info May Have Been Updated

WASHINGTON (AP) - Authorities have some evidence that suspected terror surveillance information on five financial buildings was looked at again and perhaps updated in January, a top homeland security official said Friday. Separately, President Bush defended the decision to issue terrorism warnings last weekend based on the information.

Anemic Job Growth Adds to Economic Worries

WASHINGTON (AP) - America's payrolls grew by an anemic 32,000 new jobs in July, suggesting the economy is stuck in summer lethargy three months before voters elect a president. The report rattled Wall Street and sent stocks tumbling. The latest snapshot on employment growth, in a report Friday by the Labor Department, showed the smallest gain in hiring since December. Job gains reported earlier for May and June also were lowered.

Iranian Detainee Boycotts Military Hearing

GUANTANAMO BAY NAVAL BASE, Cuba (AP) - An Iranian detainee boycotted a U.S. military review hearing, the sixth prisoner to stay away from the proceeding to determine whether hundreds of Guantanamo Bay prisoners are being properly held or should be set free. In his absence, Friday's open tribunal hearing lasted 13 minutes.

Funk Singer Rick James Dies at Age 56

LOS ANGELES (AP) - Funk legend Rick James peaked in 1981 with "Super Freak," a song so enduring that a strain of its infectious bass line powered the MC Hammer hit "U Can't Touch This" nearly a decade later. But James' career never had the staying power of his signature hit, and the singer's life and music languished through cocaine addiction and a prison term. In his final days, James made a comeback bid that included playing along with routines by comedian Dave Chappelle that parodied his history of erratic behavior.

Deep-Sea Vessel Puts Ocean Floor in Reach

WASHINGTON (AP) - A new deep-sea research vessel will be able to carry people to 99 percent of the ocean floor, diving deeper than the famed Alvin that pioneered the study of seafloor vents, plate tectonics and deep ocean creatures over the past 40 years. The new American submersible will provide the tools to reach "not for the stars but for the depths," Robert Gagosian, president of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, said Friday at a briefing at the National Science Foundation.

Walker Traded to Power-Packed Cardinals

The St. Louis Cardinals had a power-packed lineup and the best record in baseball before they added Larry Walker. Good luck getting them out now. Walker was traded from Colorado to the Cardinals on Friday night for minor league pitcher Jason Burch and two players to be named. The five-time All-Star and 1997 NL MVP joins a team that features sluggers Albert Pujols, Scott Rolen and Jim Edmonds.

./A46952-2004Aug6.txt010064400037510000032000000106141010504344000142110ustar00spudftpweb00001400350331When Peggy Kerry addressed a gathering of feminists on behalf of the Democratic presidential nominee at the party's convention in Boston last week, she upset a few people -- namely a Catholic antiabortion group that said Kerry, a federal employee, was out of line in making such a prominent campaign appearance on behalf of her brother, Sen. John F. Kerry (Mass.).

But did she really do anything wrong?

The State Department says no, and officials there defended the career civil servant's appearance on First Amendment grounds. "As a career employee, she may take an active part" in her brother's campaign, an agency spokesman told Post reporter Al Kamen after the incident.

Here in the capital city, government and politics are a way of life -- and even the life's work -- of many folks. The lines between career and campaign can get blurry, especially for those new to the city. This is never more true than in the middle of an election season.

Political activities by government workers are regulated by law, but not banned. The Hatch Act, passed in 1939 and amended several times, spells out the rules. Employees at some federal agencies, such as the CIA, FBI and the Federal Elections Commission, are under much more stringent guidelines than other rank-and-file workers. For details, visit the U.S. Office of Special Counsel's Web site on the Hatch Act (www.osc.gov/ha_fed.htm).

Private-sector employees aren't restricted by such laws -- or protected by them. Suffice it to say that if the boss doesn't like your politics and you insist on bringing them to work anyway, you can be fired.

Here are a few guidelines to keep you on the right side of this political divide:

Ask first. If you suspect a potential conflict of interest, run your planned activities by a supervisor. Presumably, his greater experience will give him a better understanding of the fine distinctions within your industry. If nothing else, this will at least distribute the blame more broadly should trouble come later. One reason Peggy Kerry was in the clear was that she sought the advice of her superiors at the State Department in February.

Keep it after-hours. Ask your fellow campaigners, agitators and fundraisers to refrain from calling you at the office. If they need to reach you during work hours, have them call your cell phone and leave messages. You can return the calls on your breaks -- preferably off-site. If you're planning a lengthy project, consider using your vacation time. Kerry, for example, took off work for the week she was in Boston campaigning.

Don't use company resources. No, not even after your boss has left. The only way you should be using the office copier to reproduce 1,000 fliers advertising your upcoming campus kegger for Kerry is if you work for the Democratic National Committee. And even then, I suggest you ask first. Keep in mind that your work e-mail account belongs to the company. One of my friends from high school often e-mails me anti-Bush jokes from his work account. He's in the Air Force. I cringe every time.

Leave your employer out of it. That means no leveraging your title at work or the prestige of your employer in your political activities. This can be subtle, and I'm not recommending you lie about what you do for a living. But definitely downplay it, lest anyone think you are speaking on behalf of the company. This also protects you in case your employer's reputation sinks. Just a few years ago, you would have been the cat's pajamas with Texas Republicans if you worked for Enron Corp. Now that association is the equivalent of political scabies.

By definition, democracy requires the participation of average citizens. We shouldn't leave politics up to the professionals, nor should we leave out common sense.

Workplace Campaigning

How are you balancing your political activities with work in this presidential election season? Got an annoying co-worker who won't stop leaving political pamphlets on your desk? E-mail me at slayterme@washpost.com.

Join Mary Ellen Slayter for Career Track Live, an online discussion of issues affecting young workers, at 11 a.m. Friday at www.washingtonpost.com.

./A47641-2004Aug7.txt010064400037510000032000000115611010513362000142100ustar00spudftpweb00001400350331American Beheaded in Islamic Online Video

CAIRO, Egypt (AP) - New video aired Saturday purportedly shows a San Francisco man being depacitated moments after he urges the United States to end its occupation of Iraq. The man on the tape identified himself as what sounds like Benjamin Vanderford, from San Francisco. He sat on a chair in a dark room, his hands behind his back, trembling and rocking back and forth.

Sporadic Gunfire After Fierce Najaf Fight

NAJAF, Iraq (AP) - Sporadic explosions and gunfire echoed through this holy Shiite city on Saturday after two days of intense clashes between U.S. forces and Shiite Muslim insurgents that marked some of the bloodiest fighting in Iraq in months and killed up to 300 people. A 24-hour government deadline for the militants to leave Najaf expired Saturday without any sign of a pullout - or any major attack. The city was the quietest it's been since fighting erupted Thursday between American troops and militants loyal to Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr and spread to several cities across Iraq including the capital.

AP Poll: Kerry Narrows Security Issue Gap

WASHINGTON (AP) - Democrat John Kerry is putting the pressure on President Bush on his strongest issue, national defense, but the incumbent retains an advantage there, an Associated Press poll found. The Democratic National Convention in late July focused heavily on Kerry's war service and on national security, a strategy that appears to be paying dividends for the White House challenger.

AP: Arrests Damage al-Qaida Network

ISLAMABAD, Pakistan (AP) - The trail began with a hunt for the people who ambushed a Pakistani commander as his motorcade tried to cross Karachi's Clifton Bridge in June. It led to a torrent of intelligence and ended with dozens of arrests in Pakistan and Britain and a terror warning in the United States. Along the way, investigators passed through Karachi's teeming streets, to the dusty tribal village of Shakai along the Pakistan-Afghan border, to seemingly placid suburban London, to the world's financial headquarters in New York and to Washington, D.C.

Terror Threat Info May Have Been Updated

WASHINGTON (AP) - Authorities have some evidence that suspected terror surveillance information on five financial buildings was looked at again and perhaps updated in January, a top homeland security official said Friday. Separately, President Bush defended the decision to issue terrorism warnings last weekend based on the information.

Anemic Job Growth Adds to Economic Worries

WASHINGTON (AP) - America's payrolls grew by an anemic 32,000 new jobs in July, suggesting the economy is stuck in summer lethargy three months before voters elect a president. The report rattled Wall Street and sent stocks tumbling. The latest snapshot on employment growth, in a report Friday by the Labor Department, showed the smallest gain in hiring since December. Job gains reported earlier for May and June also were lowered.

Iranian Detainee Boycotts Military Hearing

GUANTANAMO BAY NAVAL BASE, Cuba (AP) - An Iranian detainee boycotted a U.S. military review hearing, the sixth prisoner to stay away from the proceeding to determine whether hundreds of Guantanamo Bay prisoners are being properly held or should be set free. In his absence, Friday's open tribunal hearing lasted 13 minutes.

Funk Singer Rick James Dies at Age 56

LOS ANGELES (AP) - Funk legend Rick James peaked in 1981 with "Super Freak," a song so enduring that a strain of its infectious bass line powered the MC Hammer hit "U Can't Touch This" nearly a decade later. But James' career never had the staying power of his signature hit, and the singer's life and music languished through cocaine addiction and a prison term. In his final days, James made a comeback bid that included playing along with routines by comedian Dave Chappelle that parodied his history of erratic behavior.

Deep-Sea Vessel Puts Ocean Floor in Reach

WASHINGTON (AP) - A new deep-sea research vessel will be able to carry people to 99 percent of the ocean floor, diving deeper than the famed Alvin that pioneered the study of seafloor vents, plate tectonics and deep ocean creatures over the past 40 years. The new American submersible will provide the tools to reach "not for the stars but for the depths," Robert Gagosian, president of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, said Friday at a briefing at the National Science Foundation.

Walker Traded to Power-Packed Cardinals

The St. Louis Cardinals had a power-packed lineup and the best record in baseball before they added Larry Walker. Good luck getting them out now. Walker was traded from Colorado to the Cardinals on Friday night for minor league pitcher Jason Burch and two players to be named. The five-time All-Star and 1997 NL MVP joins a team that features sluggers Albert Pujols, Scott Rolen and Jim Edmonds.

./A47091-2004Aug7.txt010064400037510000032000000047301010505356000142130ustar00spudftpweb00001400350331BRUSSELS, Belgium - With the European Union's approval, Greece said Friday it will ban the Belarusian sport minister from attending the Olympics in Athens because of allegations he is guilty of human rights abuses at home.

The Greek government said it would place a visa ban on Yuri Sivakov shortly to keep him out of the country, even if he does have Olympic accreditation for the Aug. 13-29 games.

"The European Union considers the presence of Mr. Sivakov at the upcoming Olympic Games in Athens to be completely inappropriate," the 25-nation bloc said in a statement Friday.

Sivakov and Belarus President Alexander Lukashenko have been implicated in the disappearances of prominent opposition figures. The EU statement came after a day of diplomatic contacts between the 25 capitals to come up with a united stand on the issue.

"He will not come. It is over," Greek Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Ioanna Efthimiadou in Athens.

Sivakov denounced the Greek move as "clumsy political games" and said he plans to attend the Olympics anyway, said his spokesman, Anatoly Artemyev. The spokesman said Sivakov's accreditation allows for that.

"Yuri Sivakov is going to the Olympics in Greece as a member of that team and in this case a visa plays no role. Only accreditation is necessary and he has this," Artemyev said.

Sivakov had the government's backing.

"Any attempts to blow this issue out of proportion are counterproductive and run counter to the norms of the Olympic movement," Foreign Ministry spokesman Ruslan Yesin told the Interfax news agency.

Friday's EU statement referred to a report of the Council of Europe criticizing the human rights situation in Belarus.

On April 28, the Council of Europe said that political pressure, including sanctions, should be applied against Belarus in the suspicious disappearances of four men, including two prominent opposition figures.

The Council's parliamentary assembly had earlier called for an investigation into the alleged involvement of senior Belarusian officials in the disappearances in 1999 and 2000. The missing include a former interior minister and a senior legislator.

The assembly also called for a criminal probe to be launched against Sivakov, who was then interior minister.

The Council of Europe, formed in 1949, monitors standards of human rights and democracy in 43 countries.

---

Associated Press writer Patrick Quinn in Athens contributed to this report.

./A47075-2004Aug6.txt010066400007670000032000000057451010505361400140300ustar00wlogicweb00001400350331DETROIT - Dmitri Young had three hits and scored twice, including the go-ahead run in the sixth, to help the Detroit Tigers beat the Boston Red Sox 4-3 on Friday night.

Carlos Guillen had three hits, including a game-winning single that helped the Tigers stop a four-game losing streak.

Boston lost for the fourth time in six games and dropped a season-high 10 1/2 games behind the first-place New York Yankees in the AL East. The largest deficit the Red Sox have ever overcome to win the division was 10 games, in 1988.

Roberto Novoa (1-0) gave up only one walk while striking out four over 1 1-3 innings to earn his first major league victory.

After relieving Mike Maroth with the bases loaded in the sixth, Novoa walked home the tying run, then struck out Orlando Cabrera to get out of the inning and struck out the side in the seventh. He made his major league debut on July 29, then struck out the side in the seventh.

Jamie Walker pitched the eighth, and Ugueth Urbina entered the game in the ninth and picked up his 18th save in 20 chances.

Derek Lowe (9-10) gave up four runs -- for the fifth straight start -- and nine hits over seven innings. Lowe had won two straight and three of his last four decisions.

Maroth gave up three runs, 10 hits and three walks over 5 2-3 innings.

Detroit improved to 9-19 in one-run games, and Boston dropped to 7-15 -- the two worst record in the major leagues.

The game was delayed by rain for 34 minutes, with the game scoreless in the top of the third.

Boston took a 1-0 lead in the fourth when Jason Varitek hit his first triple of the season, and scored on Kevin Millar's single.

Then, Detroit made two strong plays defensively. Second baseman Omar Infante went deep to his left to make a stop and throw for the second out, and Infante's relay home after Bill Mueller's double was in time to put out Millar.

The Tigers went ahead 3-1 in the home half with four straight singles. Carlos Pena drove in two runs, and Rondell White scored when Bobby Higginson hit into a double play.

Varitek led off the sixth with a 438-foot homer to left, his 14th, to pull Boston within one and Maroth was chased after loading the bases with one out.

Notes: The Red Sox acquired left-handed reliever Mike Myers from Seattle for a player to be named, or cash. Myers was 4-1 with a 4.88 ERA in 50 appearances with the Mariners. ... Boston's David Ortiz can play Saturday after serving his five-game suspension for throwing bats onto the field after he was ejected from a game July 16 at Anaheim. ... Detroit OF Craig Monroe (hamstring, DL since July 21) is tentatively scheduled to be activated Saturday. ... Tigers RHP Gary Knotts (shoulder, DL since July 28) threw on the side. ... Varitek has seven triples in his seven major league seasons. ... Bill Mueller's single in the sixth was his 1,000th career hit. ... The game drew a sellout crowd of 40,674.

./A47101-2004Aug7.txt010064400037510000032000000025241010505553400142050ustar00spudftpweb00001400350331DIAMOND BAR, Calif. - Southern California's smog-fighting agency went after emissions of the bovine variety Friday, adopting the nation's first rules to reduce air pollution from dairy cow manure.

The measure, which will be phased in beginning Dec. 1, applies to more than 300 dairies in the Chino area, which is considered to have the highest concentration of dairy cows in the nation.

"Emissions from that manure contribute to ozone and fine particulate pollution, which must be reduced to meet federal health-based air quality standards," said Barry Wallerstein, executive director of the South Coast Air Quality Management District.

Roughly 300,000 cows in dairies east of Los Angeles produce a million tons of manure each year. Ammonia and other pollutants from the waste mix with smokestack and auto emissions blowing inland from the Los Angeles basin.

The new regulation requires dairies with at least 50 cows to remove manure from corrals more frequently, and send it to a composting facility or an agricultural area where it is approved for use as a fertilizer.

It is expected to cost the industry about $3.5 million a year, or about $15,000 per dairy, air quality officials said. By 2010, the regulation is expected to reduce ammonia emissions by more than three tons per day and cut down on other pollutants as well.

./A47094-2004Aug7.txt010064400037510000032000000006711010505440600142160ustar00spudftpweb00001400350331Matsui Powers Yanks Past Blue Jays 11-4

Cardinals Hold Off Mets 6-4

Rockies Trade Larry Walker to Cardinals

AP: Baseball to Vote on Selig Extension

Colangelo Out As CEO of Diamondbacks

U.S. Dominates Serbia-Montenegro 78-60

Lakers Trade Payton, Fox to Celtics

Vick Says No Need to Fuss About Injuries

Texas Heisman Hopeful Gets Jail Time

Agassi to Play Roddick in Cincinnati Semis

./A47095-2004Aug7.txt010064400037510000032000000037111010505442100142120ustar00spudftpweb00001400350331PORT ANGELES, Wash. - A long-delayed project to remove two dams on the Olympic Peninsula's Elwha River received official approval Friday, clearing the way toward restoring one of the state's most productive salmon rivers.

The city of Port Angeles, the National Park Service and members of the Lower Elwha Klallam tribe signed the agreement Friday to begin work on the $182 million plan to restore the Elwha.

Approximately 145 dams have been removed in the United States since 1999, but all were smaller than the 108-foot-tall Elwha Dam and the 210-foot-tall Glines Canyon Dam.

"This is going to be a major historic project, removing these two dams and restoring salmon habitat," said Rep. Norm Dicks, D-Wash., who attended the signing.

The project is set to start in 2008. It was approved by Congress in 1992, but has been stalled as negotiations dragged on over its impact on local communities.

The Port Angeles City Council approved its participation in the plan earlier this week. However, Mayor Richard Headrick, voting against it, expressed concerns over potential effects on the city's water rights and supply.

Workers will dismantle the dams in stages, reopening 70 miles of salmon and steelhead spawning habitat.

It will take up to three years to remove the dams, which were built for hydroelectricity more than 70 years ago without fish ladders - a violation of state law. They have choked off the salmon runs for most of the past century.

Removing the dams will release sediment - 18 million cubic yards of dirt and gravel - that will initially degrade the river's water quality.

Scientists will study how that much sediment will affect the river bed, the delta and fish spawning habitat.

The federal government will put $70 million toward construction of a water-treatment plant in Port Angeles, while the Lower Elwha Klallam Reservation will receive a sewer system, raised flood-protection levee and fish hatchery.

ts participation in the plan earlier this week. However./A47096-2004Aug7.txt010064400037510000032000000016641010505443300142230ustar00spudftpweb00001400350331Najaf Sees Worst Fighting Since Fall of Saddam; 300 Militants Killed in Two Days

AP Poll: Kerry Narrows Gap With Bush on Protecting the Country but Race Remains Tight

Information on Buildings in Terror Warning Had Been Accessed, Perhaps Updated, Official Says

AP Exclusive: Arrests Lead to a Web of Militancy Stretching From Pakistan to Britain to U.S.

Employment Growth Lethargic, With Just 32,000 New Jobs in July Three Months Before Election

3rd-Generation Yale Man Bush Tells Minority Journalists He Opposes 'Legacy' College Admissions

Soldier Testifies at England Hearing That 'Moral Call' Led Him to Expose Abuse at Abu Ghraib

Funk Legend Rick James, Best Known for 1981 Hit 'Super Freak,' Dies in Los Angeles at Age 56

New Deep-Sea Research Vessel Will Be Able to Carry People to 99 Percent of the Ocean Floor

Matsui Homers Twice, Drives in Six Runs As Yankees Rout Blue Jays 11-4

./A47642-2004Aug7.txt010064400037510000032000000056441010513363300142220ustar00spudftpweb00001400350331CAIRO, Egypt - New video aired Saturday purportedly shows a San Francisco man being depacitated moments after he urges the United States to end its occupation of Iraq.

The man on the tape identified himself as what sounds like Benjamin Vanderford, from San Francisco. He sat on a chair in a dark room, his hands behind his back, trembling and rocking back and forth.

There was no way to immediately determine the authenticity of the tape and the U.S. military in Iraq and the U.S. Embassy said they were unaware of the video and had no immediate comment. There was no record of a man by that name traveling to Iraq.

The tape showed a hand with a knife cutting at the motionless man's neck, but did not show his head actually removed from the body.

The man on the tape says he lives at 1510 Eddy Street in San Francisco. A Ben Vanderford has a Web site in which he says he lives at that address. The picture of Vanderford on the Web site closely resembles that of the man on the video.

"We need to leave this country alone. We need to stop this occupation," he said on the video, adding that he had been offered for exchange with prisoners in Iraq.

"We need to leave this country right now," he said. "Everyone's going to be killed this way."

Unlike in previous videos of hostage killings, no militants were seen on the footage. He was clad in a t-shirt, not the orange jumpsuit that other hostages have been dressed in.

The video was titled "Abu Musab al-Zarqawi Slaughters an American" and had no indication of when, or where, it was made. Zarqawi is an al-Qaida linked militant whose group, Tawhid and Jihad, has claimed responsibility for numerous deadly attacks across Iraq, including the beheadings of U.S. businessman Nicholas Berg, South Korean translator Kim Sun-il and a Bulgarian man, Georgi Lazov.

Their beheadings were filmed and the video posted in the Internet.

There is no mention on the Vanderford Web site of him traveling to Iraq - and no record anywhere else that anyone by that name has been captured.

On the Web site, Vanderford says he is 22 years old, and is running for supervisor of San Francisco's District 5. It also says he makes music for the label Record Label Records and is an independent video game programmer.

The video of the apparent killing also showed images of disfigured and injured people in Iraq. A recording of the Quran, Islam's holy book, played in the background.

Militants have abducted over 70 foreigners, many of them truck drivers entering Iraq with supplies for the U.S. military or contractors involved with Iraqi reconstruction efforts. At least eight of them have been killed, some by beheading.

The kidnappings are apart of an insurgent campaign aimed at forcing coalition forces out of the country and scaring foreign companies away.

--

On the Net:

Ben Vanderford Web site: www.recordlabelrecords.org/ben/index2.htm

./A47643-2004Aug7.txt010064400037510000032000000007251010513365100142160ustar00spudftpweb00001400350331American Beheaded in Islamic Online Video

Sporadic Gunfire After Fierce Najaf Fight

AP Poll: Kerry Narrows Security Issue Gap

AP: Arrests Damage al-Qaida Network

Terror Threat Info May Have Been Updated

Anemic Job Growth Adds to Economic Worries

Iranian Detainee Boycotts Military Hearing

Funk Singer Rick James Dies at Age 56

Deep-Sea Vessel Puts Ocean Floor in Reach

Walker Traded to Power-Packed Cardinals

./A47097-2004Aug7.txt010064400037510000032000000116741010505444600142320ustar00spudftpweb00001400350331Najaf Sees Worst Fighting Since 2003

NAJAF, Iraq (AP) - U.S. helicopter gunships and fighter jets pounded Shiite Muslim insurgents hiding in a sprawling cemetery Friday in the most intense fighting in this holy city since the fall of Saddam Hussein. The U.S. military said 300 militants were killed in the past two days. The clashes between coalition forces and militant Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr's Mahdi Army flared in Shiite communities across the country, killing dozens of other Iraqis, according to Iraqi officials and the militants.

AP Poll: Kerry Narrows Security Issue Gap

WASHINGTON (AP) - Democrat John Kerry, whose nominating convention highlighted his war service and focused on national security, has narrowed the gap on President Bush's strong suit of protecting the country, according to an Associated Press poll that shows the race remains tight. Flanked by his Vietnam crewmates, Kerry delivered an acceptance speech last week laden with references to patriotism, his decorated military record and his qualifications for commander in chief - a theme underscored by speaker after speaker over the four-day gathering.

Terror Threat Info May Have Been Updated

WASHINGTON (AP) - Authorities have some evidence that suspected terror surveillance information on five financial buildings was looked at again and perhaps updated in January, a top homeland security official said Friday. Separately, President Bush defended the decision to issue terrorism warnings last weekend based on the information.

AP: Arrests Damage al-Qaida Network

ISLAMABAD, Pakistan (AP) - The torrent of intelligence that led to dozens of arrests in Pakistan and Britain and a terror warning in the United States began with a hunt for those behind an audacious ambush in June on a Pakistani commander as his motorcade tried to cross Karachi's Clifton Bridge. The trail has led from the teeming streets of that southern port city, to the dusty tribal village of Shakai along the Pakistan-Afghan border, to seemingly placid suburban London, to the world's financial headquarters in New York and to Washington, D.C.

Anemic Job Growth Adds to Economic Worries

WASHINGTON (AP) - America's payrolls grew by an anemic 32,000 new jobs in July, suggesting the economy is stuck in summer lethargy three months before voters elect a president. The report rattled Wall Street and sent stocks tumbling. The latest snapshot on employment growth, in a report Friday by the Labor Department, showed the smallest gain in hiring since December. Job gains reported earlier for May and June also were lowered.

3rd-Generation Yalie Bush Opposes Legacies

WASHINGTON (AP) - President Bush, who followed his father and grandfather to Yale University despite an undistinguished academic record, said Friday that colleges should get rid of "legacy" admission preferences that favor the sons and daughters of alumni. "I think it ought to be based on merit," Bush told a conference of minority journalists when he was pressed about his views on affirmative action. "And I think colleges need to work hard for diversity."

'Moral Call' Led Soldier to Expose Abuse

FORT BRAGG, N.C. (AP) - The soldier who was the first to report his colleagues were abusing Iraqi inmates at Abu Ghraib prison testified Friday that he agonized for a month about disclosing what he had seen, but decided he could not let the abuse go on. "It violated everything I personally believed in and all I'd been taught about the rules of war," Sgt. Joseph Darby testified during a pretrial hearing for Pfc. Lynndie England. "It was more of a moral call."

Funk Singer Rick James Dies at Age 56

LOS ANGELES (AP) - Funk legend Rick James, best known for the 1981 hit "Super Freak" before his career disintegrated amid drug use and violence that sent him to prison, died Friday at age 56. James died in his sleep at his home near Universal City, publicist Sujata Murthy said. The singer lived alone and was found by his personal assistant, who notified police.

Deep-Sea Vessel Puts Ocean Floor in Reach

WASHINGTON (AP) - A new deep-sea research vessel will be able to carry people to 99 percent of the ocean floor, diving deeper than the famed Alvin that pioneered the study of seafloor vents, plate tectonics and deep ocean creatures over the past 40 years. The new American submersible will provide the tools to reach "not for the stars but for the depths," Robert Gagosian, president of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, said Friday at a briefing at the National Science Foundation.

Matsui Powers Yanks Past Blue Jays 11-4

NEW YORK (AP) - Hideki Matsui homered twice and drove in a career-high six runs in the first three innings, powering the New York Yankees to an 11-4 victory over the Toronto Blue Jays on Friday night. Javier Vazquez (13-6) allowed three runs in the first inning but yielded only two doubles and a single the rest of the way before being removed after the eighth inning.

riday by the Labor Department, showed the smallest gain in hiring si./A48518-2004Aug7.txt010064400037510000032000000007151010525253400142210ustar00spudftpweb00001400350331Iraqi Gov't Gives Amnesty for Minor Crimes

U.S.: al-Qaida Suspect Cased New York

Judge to Mull England Defense Witnesses

Bush Defends Elevated Terror Warnings

AP Poll: Kerry Gains Ground on Defense

Report: al-Qaida Made Pre-9/11 Diamond Buy

S.F. Man Says Beheading Video Is a Hoax

FBI Searches Car in Anthrax Investigation

GOP Gov. Heartbroken Over Boss' Politics

Twins' Santana Outpitches A's Hudson

./A43297-2004Aug5.txt010064400037510000032000000032111010452347100142100ustar00spudftpweb00001400350331 REDWOOD CITY, Calif. (Reuters) - A murder trial that has gripped America's attention for nearly two years with tales of a love triangle and a pregnant wife dumped in the ocean took a surprise twist on Thursday when the high-profile defense attorney declared he had evidence that could clear his client.

Defense Attorney Mark Geragos, who has represented pop star Michael Jackson and other celebrities, said he had received "potentially exculpatory information within the past 24 hours" but added he was not ready to call a witness.

His client Scott Peterson is charged with murdering his wife Laci who was eight months pregnant when she disappeared on Christmas Eve in 2002 from the couple's home in the northern California town of Modesto.

San Mateo Superior Court Judge Alfred Delucchi held an hour-long, closed-door meeting with Geragos and prosecutors before granting a request by Geragos to suspend the trial until Tuesday.

Earlier this week, Delucchi reprimanded prosecutors for repeatedly failing to share evidence that could exonerate Peterson with defense attorneys, as is required by law.

Neither Geragos nor prosecutor Rick Distaso would comment on the nature of the new evidence or on how it came to light.

Laci's body and that of her unborn son washed out of the San Francisco Bay several months after she disappeared -- not far from where Scott Peterson said he had been fishing the day she vanished.

Prosecutors had planned to put Peterson's mistress, Amber Frey, on the witness stand early next week. Prosecutors said Peterson killed his wife so he could continue his relationship with Frey.

./A47098-2004Aug7.txt010064400037510000032000000070231010505446300142230ustar00spudftpweb00001400350331NEW YORK - Hideki Matsui homered twice and drove in a career-high six runs in the first three innings, powering the New York Yankees to an 11-4 victory over the Toronto Blue Jays on Friday night.

Javier Vazquez (13-6) allowed three runs in the first inning but yielded only two doubles and a single the rest of the way before being removed after the eighth inning.

It was Matsui's first multihomer gamer in 1 1/2 seasons since coming to the major leagues from Japan. His three-run shot in the first inning offset one hit by Carlos Delgado in the top half.

Matsui, who finished 3-for-5, stretched the Yankees lead to 5-3 in the third with a solo homer off Sean Douglass, and he capped off the six-run inning with a single that drove in two.

Douglass (0-2) never made it out of the third - he was ejected for hitting Yankees catcher John Flaherty in the knee with a pitch three batters after Matsui's second shot. The ejection came without a warning from umpires.

New York (69-39) won for the sixth time in seven games to move to a season-high 30 games over .500. Last year, the Yankees didn't reach that mark until Aug. 19.

The Blue Jays started a seven-game road trip with their fifth loss in seven games.

Vazquez, starting against Toronto for the third time in his last four outings, allowed a one-out single in the first to Frank Catalanotto and then a single to Alex Rios before Delgado slammed the first pitch he saw into the right-center field bleachers.

But Vazquez, who pitched despite a bout with pink eye, settled down and retired the next 11 hitters before Gregg Zaun doubled to lead off the fifth. Vazquez allowed three runs and six hits, struck out three and didn't walk anyone.

Vazquez won his third straight decision, including two over Toronto. When Kevin Brown pitched eight innings in New York's 5-1 victory over Oakland on Thursday it was just the 10th time a Yankees pitcher went that long and the first in 19 starts.

Douglass was hoping to give the beleaguered Blue Jays bullpen a rest, but that plan was scrapped when he was thrown out of the game by plate umpire Chris Guccione.

Flaherty was down in the count 1-2, after twice trying to bunt with Bernie Williams on third. Douglass came inside with a fastball, struck Flaherty on the front knee, and was immediately tossed.

Toronto manager Carlos Tosca charged out of the dugout and spent most of his time talking with first base umpire Tim Tschida, the crew chief. Tosca was already in a pitching crisis because overworked right-handed relievers Kerry Ligtenberg, Vinnie Chulk and Jason Frasor were unavailable.

Tosca handed the ball to Justin Miller, who allowed both inherited runners to score. Miller then gave up three runs of his own, one of which was earned.

Kenny Lofton had a run-scoring infield single in the inning and Derek Jeter drove in two more with a double.

Douglass threw 67 pitches and gave up seven runs, seven hits and three walks in 2 1-3 innings.

Flaherty, playing in place of injured regular Jorge Posada, got a measure of revenge in the seventh inning with a solo homer.

Notes:@ Toronto traded DH Josh Phelps to Cleveland for minor league 1B Eric Crozier. ... Posada sat out after bruising his right thumb on a foul tip Thursday. He is day to day. ... Williams doubled twice and moved past Joe DiMaggio into fourth place on the Yankees' career list. ... C.J. Nitkowski pitched the ninth in his Yankees debut. ... Matsui had 39 multihomer games while playing in Japan, including a three-homer game.

i Matsui homered twice and drove in a career-high six runs in the first three innings, powering the New York Yankees to an 11-4 victory over the Toronto Blue Jays on Friday night.

Javier Vazquez (13-6) allowed three runs in the first inning but yielded only two doubles and a single the rest of the way before being removed after the eighth inning.

It was Matsui's first multihomer gamer in 1 1/2 seasons since coming to the major leagues from Japan. His three-run shot in the firs./A47586-2004Aug7.txt010064400037510000032000000070411010512545200142220ustar00spudftpweb00001400350331GUANTANAMO BAY NAVAL BASE, Cuba - An Iranian detainee boycotted a U.S. military review hearing, the sixth prisoner to stay away from the proceeding to determine whether hundreds of Guantanamo Bay prisoners are being properly held or should be set free.

In his absence, Friday's open tribunal hearing lasted 13 minutes.

"He dropped out," said an Air Force lieutenant colonel of the 25-year-old man, who according to the U.S. military was a Taliban fighter in Afghanistan.

The detainee relayed his decision through an officer assigned as his "personal representative." "He said, 'I don't want to participate anymore,'" said the Air Force officer whose identity was barred from being made public. The officer said the Iranian did not give a reason.

The detainee, who has been held for two years, has told the military he was a cook and driver and wasn't involved in combat.

Eleven cases have been heard since the review tribunals were convened at the U.S. military prison last week. The other detainees who refused to appear were three Yemenis, one Saudi and one Moroccan.

The military has given no reason for their absence, other than to say they have been generally uncooperative. Friday is also Muslims' weekly holy day for prayers, which may have also been an issue.

"If I were them, I would naturally assume that these so-called hearings are just another pretext for extracting information," said Clive Stafford-Smith, a human rights lawyer in New Orleans who has worked on the cases of dozens of detainees. "They've got enough sense to see that this is a sham."

Human rights groups say the process is grossly inadequate because detainees are not allowed lawyers, and argue that the three military officers who sit on each tribunal can't be considered impartial. The military says members of the review tribunals are neutral.

The tribunal process began last week to determine whether some 585 prisoners at the prison should continue to be held as "enemy combatants." The hearings are the first opportunity detainees have had to formally plead their cases since they began arriving at Guantanamo in January 2002.

The review panels have the power to recommend reversing assessments that detainees are "enemy combatants," a classification that gives them fewer legal protections than prisoner-of-war status. The panels could also recommend freeing the prisoners. The initial decisions have yet to be announced but could come next week.

The military said the Iranian detainee told investigators he traveled to Afghanistan to buy stereo parts and was conscripted by the Taliban and was trained at a Taliban camp to use an AK-47 assault rifle that he used in combat.

"Although he might not have wanted to be a member of the Taliban, he was for about two months until he was caught by the Northern Alliance," a Marine officer assigned as tribunal recorder told the panel.

The Iranian has told military officials he surrendered.

Two Afghan detainees pleaded for their freedom Thursday in the first hearings observed by journalists. Both argued they happened to be with Taliban forces but never fought against American troops.

The review panels are separate from military commissions that are to try an initial group of four detainees on war crimes conspiracy and other charges. Pretrial hearings for those cases are planned later this month.

The military convened the Combatant Status Review Tribunals in response to a Supreme Court ruling in June that prisoners have a right to challenge their detention in U.S. courts.

./A47099-2004Aug7.txt010064400037510000032000000007171010505447600142330ustar00spudftpweb00001400350331Najaf Sees Worst Fighting Since 2003

AP Poll: Kerry Narrows Security Issue Gap

Terror Threat Info May Have Been Updated

AP: Arrests Damage al-Qaida Network

Anemic Job Growth Adds to Economic Worries

3rd-Generation Yalie Bush Opposes Legacies

'Moral Call' Led Soldier to Expose Abuse

Funk Singer Rick James Dies at Age 56

Deep-Sea Vessel Puts Ocean Floor in Reach

Matsui Powers Yanks Past Blue Jays 11-4


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