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For Older Drivers, Giving Up License And Independence Can Be Tough

• It's okay to drive one gear down. That can help in stopping.

• If you're coming to a stop, rather than downshifting, put the vehicle in neutral and then brake. Putting the vehicle in neutral eliminates pressure from the front or rear wheels to keep going.

Dr. Gridlock can be reached at (703) 279-3200 or by e-mail at drgridlock@washpost.com.

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Hope this helps.

Warm Up the Orange Line

Dear Dr. Gridlock:

I frequently ride the Orange Line from one end to the other, which takes about one hour. There seems to be no heat in the cars this winter -- it is really much too cold. The lack of heat has a few times kept me away from Metro and put me into my warm vehicle.

What does Metro say?

Gretchen Dunn

New Carrollton

Metro spokeswoman Lisa Farbstein checked on your concern and responded:

"There is no problem with heat on the Orange Line. If someone thinks there is a problem with no heat on a specific rail car, he or she can notify us at 202-637-1328 with the number of the rail car. The number is posted on either end of the car.

"Heat or air conditioning in the rail cars is not regulated by the train operator.

"Keep in mind that early morning trains at the end of the lines start out cold when they leave the rail yard, just like your automobile is cold when you first turn it on.

"Then the train pulls up to the first station and sits at the platform for a few minutes with all of its doors wide open, which allows the cold winter air or hot summer heat to enter the cars.

"Sometimes it takes a few station stops to warm or cool the rail cars."

I hope that helps, Ms. Dunn. If the question hasn't been sufficiently answered here, feel free to e-mail me.

Snow Safety Lessons

Dear Dr. Gridlock:


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