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Bundt Pan Creator H. David Dalquist, 86

Associated Press
Thursday, January 6, 2005; Page B08

H. David Dalquist, 86, creator of the famous Bundt cake pan, died Jan. 2 at his home in Edina, Minn. He had a heart ailment.

Mr. Dalquist founded St. Louis Park, Minn.-based NordicWare, which has sold more than 50 million Bundt pans, the top-selling cake pan in the world.

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"I think he was overwhelmed by the success and popularity of the pan," Mr. Dalquist's son, David, told the St. Paul Pioneer Press. "He never dreamed it would be as accepted by American consumers as it was."

Mr. Dalquist designed the pan in 1950 at the request of members of the Minneapolis chapter of the Hadassah Society. They had old ceramic cake pans of somewhat similar designs but wanted an aluminum pan.

Mr. Dalquist created a new shape and added regular folds for easy cake-cutting.

The women from the society called the pans "bund pans" because "bund" is German for a gathering of people. Mr. Dalquist added a "t" to the end of "bund" and trademarked the name.

For years, the company sold few such pans. Then in 1966, a Texas woman won second place in the Pillsbury Bake-Off for her Tunnel of Fudge Cake made in a Bundt pan. Suddenly, bakers across the United States wanted their own Tunnel of Fudge cakes, and Bundt pans were perfect for tunnel cakes.

The Bundt pan is now the single-biggest product line for NordicWare, which sells a large variety of pots and pans and kitchen equipment. More than 1 million Bundt pans are sold each year.

Mr. Dalquist founded NordicWare after returning from duty with the Navy during World War II. He was a chemical engineering graduate of the University of Minnesota.

Survivors include his wife, Dorothy Margerite Staugaard Dalquist; four children; and 12 grandchildren.


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