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IPhoto Photo Sharing; Intercepted Viruses

Sunday, October 24, 2004; Page F07

I have 800 photos in iPhoto on my eMac that I would like to copy to my Compaq laptop. Since both computers are on the same wireless network, I should be able to do this -- right?

Right. But not simply. The photo-sharing feature in iPhoto works only with other copies of this Mac-only program, and using Mac OS X's built-in Windows file-sharing to make the entire iPhoto Library folder accessible to the PC over the home network will yield only a confusing morass of original and edited photo files, plus shortcuts to the same.

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The simplest workaround is to move only the edited photos to the PC. First, turn on file-sharing in Windows if it isn't already enabled, then move over to the Mac and open the PC's My Pictures folder. Make sure the folder is not obscured by iPhoto's own window, select your entire iPhoto library (click the Photo Library heading at the top of the left-hand column) and drag all of those pictures to My Pictures. You'll get a complete set of your photos as edited, ready to open on the PC.

You may get an occasional message that a photo file is in use and could not be copied. If that happens, try quitting and restarting iPhoto. Logging out of, then back into, your OS X user account may also help.

I received this message from my Internet provider that it had intercepted a virus you sent me. What the [bleep] are you up to?

Nothing: A virus sent it from somebody else's computer and took my address as its own.

Exploiting people's trust in familiar names is a standard tactic for virus authors. They search through the files on an infected PC's hard drive for e-mail addresses, then send out copies of themselves to all the addresses they find -- while using some of those as their own return address. It's galling to see your good name dragged through the mud like this, but there's not much you can do about it but fume silently.

-- Rob Pegoraro

Rob Pegoraro attempts to untangle computing conundrums and errant electronics each week. Send questions to The Washington Post, 1150 15th St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20071 or rob@twp.com.


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