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Some Barred From Bush's North Dakota Speech

Friday, February 4, 2005; Page A08

Not everyone was welcome, apparently, at President Bush's speech in North Dakota yesterday.

The Fargo Forum reported that a city commissioner, a liberal radio producer, a deputy Democratic campaign manager and a number of university professors were among more than 40 area residents who were barred from attending the Bush event. Their names were on a list supplied to workers at two ticket distribution sites.

_____More Coverage_____
Bush Shops Social Security Plan (The Washington Post, Feb 4, 2005)
Benefit Cuts Would Offset Contributions (The Washington Post, Feb 4, 2005)
Questions and Answers (The Washington Post, Feb 4, 2005)
Workers Under 55 Would Need To Save More Under Proposals (The Washington Post, Feb 4, 2005)
_____Special Report_____
Social Security

Friday's Question:
It was not until the early 20th century that the Senate enacted rules allowing members to end filibusters and unlimited debate. How many votes were required to invoke cloture when the Senate first adopted the rule in 1917?
51
60
64
67


The "Bush blacklist" is "frightening," Tom Athans, chief executive of Democracy Radio, said after learning that a producer for the liberal "Ed Schultz Show" was among those barred. "To blacklist a local citizen because he produces a radio program at odds with the political agenda of the White House is dangerous for democracy."

City Commissioner Linda Coates, whose husband was also on the list, told the newspaper that the list "is very revealing as to what this administration is all about."

The White House said the list may have come from volunteers; it did not come from the White House.

-- Howard Kurtz


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