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Friday, October 1, 2004; Page A26

Sudan President Says U.S. Trained Rebels

KHARTOUM, Sudan -- The United States helped train and arm rebels from western Sudan who rose up against the Sudanese government last year, Lt. Gen. Omar Hassan Bashir, the Sudanese president, said in remarks published in an Egyptian newspaper Thursday.

"Who else than the United States is behind this? . . . They took rebels to Eritrea and set up training camps for them, spent money on them, armed them," Bashir told the Al-Ahram weekly when asked about foreign involvement in the Darfur region.


Slimane Hadj Abderrahmane was returned to Denmark.

A State Department official in Washington, speaking on condition of anonymity, dismissed the charge. "The whole purpose of the U.S. policy is to end the violence in Sudan," the official said. "We are not funding, training, providing armaments to, supporting in any way, shape or form the rebels."

The United States has labeled the violence in Darfur genocide, blaming the Sudanese government and the Arab Janjaweed militia, which Khartoum has been accused of arming.

europe

COPENHAGEN -- A Danish man who was released from U.S. military detention in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, has told a TV interviewer he plans to travel to Chechnya and join Islamic radicals fighting Russian forces.

In a live interview with the DR-1 television channel Wednesday night, Slimane Hadj Abderrahmane, 31, said he planned to go into hiding and then "try to find a way to Chechnya."

As a condition of his release from Guantanamo in February, Abderrahmane pledged to refrain from warfare.

The United States has been under pressure from foreign governments to repatriate citizens held at Guantanamo.

BERLIN -- Lawyers representing victims of a 1986 Berlin nightclub bombing said Thursday that the first part of $35 million in compensation had arrived from Libya after a three-week delay. A German court ruled in 2001 that the Libyan secret service was behind the bombing, which killed two U.S. soldiers and a Turkish woman and injured more than 200 people.

the americas

SANTIAGO, Chile -- Augusto Pinochet underwent court-ordered psychiatric and neurological tests to determine whether he is fit to stand trial for the disappearance of 25 leftist dissidents during his 1973-90 dictatorship.

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti -- Gunfire erupted as Haitians calling for the return of ousted President Jean-Bertrand Aristide marched near the presidential palace. At least three police officers were killed. The violence came after armed rebels challenged U.N. peacekeepers Wednesday at the entrance to the storm-ravaged city of Gonaives.

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PESHAWAR, Pakistan -- Pakistani intelligence agents arrested a Libyan on suspicion of having links to al Qaeda after raiding a home Thursday on the outskirts of this northwestern city, security officials said.

SPIN BOLDAK, Afghanistan -- Guerrillas from the ousted Taliban governing militia killed at least 12 soldiers in Afghanistan's south. At least seven soldiers were killed in other clashes in the province of Zabol on Tuesday and Wednesday, provincial officials said.

-- From News Services


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