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Quick Quotes

About this Series

Tuesday, August 17, 2004; Page A07

Sunday

An Agency Takes a Turn

Under President Bush, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration has made sometimes subtle changes in regulations that carry large consequences for workers and employers. Across the government, the Bush administration has started fewer regulations and killed more inherited proposals than did either of the two previous administrations.

__  Regulatory News By Agency __

_____Previous Columns_____
Appalachia Is Paying Price for White House Rule Change (The Washington Post, Aug 17, 2004)
'Data Quality' Law Is Nemesis Of Regulation (The Washington Post, Aug 16, 2004)
Data Recorders in Cars Might Open Pandora's Black Box (The Washington Post, Jul 27, 2004)
You Say Potato, I Say It's Processed (The Washington Post, Jul 20, 2004)
More past columns
_____Regulations on the Web_____
Government Printing Office provides the text of rules.
The Federal Register lists new rules and proposals daily.
The General Accounting Office offers cost-benefit analyses of major rules.
OMB Watch is a public interest group that monitors the Office of Management and Budget.
The Mercatus Center at George Mason University provides conservative analysis of rules.
Regulation.org is the conservative Heritage Foundation's rules site.
The AEI-Brookings Joint Center for Regulatory Studies offers scholary rules analysis, including its $100 Million Club.
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Monday

A Policy Puts Science on Trial

A last-minute addition to an unrelated piece of legislation has created a tool for attacking the science used by federal agencies as a basis for new regulations. Industry has embraced the Data Quality Act to challenge 32 major proposals, including a successful assault on efforts to restrict the use of the herbicide atrazine.

Today

A Word Accelerates

Mountaintop Mining

By changing the word "waste" to "fill" in a regulation covering coal mining, Bush appointees have allowed an increase in the destruction of mountaintops in Appalachia.


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