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2. CLEVELAND INDIANS

Wednesday, March 30, 2005; Page H11

Last season, it seemed as if the Cleveland Indians' success came out of nowhere. All of a sudden, hitting coach Eddie Murray's stable of young bats came of age at the same time. All of a sudden, pitchers such as Cliff Lee and Jake Westbrook emerged.

But to the Indians, none of it was sudden or unexpected -- though maybe it was a little sooner than anyone thought. When GM Mark Shapiro dismantled the team's roster in 2002, he said it would take four years to build it back into a contender. Last year was only Year 3, and the Indians improved by 12 games and contended briefly in August.

_____ Breakdown _____
 baseball
Lineup
CF Coco Crisp
3B Aaron Boone
C Victor Martinez
DH Travis Hafner
LH Casey Blake
1B Ben Broussard
RF Juan Gonzalez
2B Ron Belliard
SS Jhonny Peralta
Rotation
LHP C.C. Sabathia
RHP Jake Westbrook
RHP Kevin Millwood
LHP Cliff Lee
RHP Scott Elarton
Closer
RHP Bob Wickman

Best move: Snagging 2003 ALCS hero Aaron Boone, who missed all of 2004 with a blown-out knee.
Biggest loss: SS Omar Vizquez was a franchise cornerstone for more than a decade before leaving for San Francisco.
Top rivals: Minnesota Twins.

___ Team Capsules ___
PREDICTED ORDER OF FINISH
NL East
NL Central
NL West
1. Cubs
4. Mets
4. Reds
   
 
AL East
AL Central
AL West
 


This year, then, is the targeted Year 4, and the Indians are in perfect position to fulfill Shapiro's promise of contention.

To do so with the division's lowest payroll (roughly $45 million) will be no small task. Already the Indians are suffering with injuries -- ace C.C. Sabathia will miss at least the first few weeks of the season with a strained abdominal muscle.

To challenge the Twins for the division title, the Indians will need newcomer Kevin Millwood to regain his Atlanta form and anchor the rotation. They will need 22-year-old shortstop Jhonny Peralta to make people stop lamenting the departure of Omar Vizquel. And they will need the bats to keep producing.

But none of those things seems impossible -- and thus, neither does a title run that would make Shapiro look very, very smart.


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