washingtonpost.com  > Sports > Leagues and Sports > MLB > Preview

4. CINCINNATI REDS

Wednesday, March 30, 2005; Page H14

It has been nearly five years since Ken Griffey Jr. or the Cincinnati Reds mattered in any significant way. But there seems to be a chance that one or both of them can change that this season.

Griffey, on his way back from yet another injury rehabilitation -- this time surgery to repair a torn hamstring -- has looked both healthy and productive this spring. And the Reds, not completely coincidentally, are talking like contenders.

_____ Breakdown _____
 baseball
Lineup
2B D. Jimenez
RF Austin Kearns
1B Sean Casey
CF Ken Griffey Jr.
LF Adam Dunn
3B Joe Randa
C Jason LaRue
SS Felipe Lopez
Rotation
LHP Eric Milton
RHP Paul Wilson
RHP Ramon Ortiz
RHP Aaron Harang
LHP Brandon Claussen
Closer
RHP Danny Graves

Best move: Coming out of nowhere to steal LHP Eric Milton from the likes of the Yankees and Red Sox.
Biggest loss: The retirement of SS Barry Larkin cost the Reds a good part of their soul.
Top rival: Cleveland Indians.

___ Team Capsules ___
PREDICTED ORDER OF FINISH
NL East
NL Central
NL West
1. Cubs
4. Mets
4. Reds
   
 
AL East
AL Central
AL West
 


Well, which is less unlikely -- Griffey playing a full season and putting up numbers like the 1990s Griffey? Or the Reds returning to contention following four years in which they averaged nearly 90 losses?

The surprise signing of lefty Eric Milton this winter was an inspired move -- provided the fly-ball specialist isn't undone by the homer-happy tendencies of Great American Ballpark. Likewise, right-hander Paul Wilson and newcomer Ramon Ortiz are solid in the number two and three slots.

And there is little doubt the Reds will score lots of runs, especially if Griffey remains healthy. Big Adam Dunn seems capable of a 50-homer season at Cincy's little bandbox, and the Reds actually have enough productive outfielders to entertain trading away Wily Mo Peña.

In all likelihood, the NL Central is just a little too deep and the Reds just a little too shaky, pitching-wise, for them to leapfrog three teams and win the division this season. But don't be surprised if they're in the mix longer than you might have expected.


© 2005 The Washington Post Company