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washingtonpost.com > Business > Special Reports > Microsoft
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Attorney General John Ashcroft meets reporters at the Justice Department in Washington Friday, Nov. 2, 2001 to discuss a proposed settlement in the Microsoft antitrust case. (Rick Bowmer - AP)
U.S. v. Microsoft
Microsoft On June 7, 2000, a judge ordered Microsoft to be broken up. It was the most significant antitrust decree since AT&T in 1982 and Standard Oil in 1911.

Nearly one year later a federal appeals court reversed the decree, denouncing the judge, but still found Microsoft broke federal antitrust law.

Documents: 2001
June 28: Judgment (PDF)

Documents: 2000
June 7: Judgment | Court Order
June 5: DOJ's Final Proposal
June 6: Microsoft's Final Reply
April 3: Conclusions of Law
Nov. 5, 1999: Findings of Fact

About the Case
Coming Battles for Microsoft
The Making of a Monopoly
Microsoft's dominance
Timeline

Also, take a look at ...
Post Profile: Bill Gates
Current stock price
Special Report: Antitrust

Live Online
Sept. 7: Rep. Jay Inslee on Justice not seeking the breakup

Aug. 8: Will the Supreme Court take the case?

June 29: Post reporter on the court's reaction to Judge Jackson

Other transcripts on the case

Camera Works
Scenes Surrounding the Case
Video
Analysis: Post reporter James V. Grimaldi

Gates Reacts

Audio
Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer answers the questions: Do you see Linux as a competitor?

Are you developing Office for Linux?

Microsoft Ruling Overturned
A federal appeals court reversed parts of a $521 million patent ruling against Microsoft Corp. on Wednesday, giving the world's largest software maker another chance to prove that its Web browser didn't illegally copy a key piece of technology.
- The Washington Post

In the News
Microsoft's Gates Urges Governors To Restructure U.S. High Schools (Post, Feb. 27, 2005)

Microsoft Plans To Give Away Security Program (Post, Feb. 16, 2005)

Microsoft Still Patching Software Security Holes: Company Releases 8 'Critical' Updates (Post, Feb. 9, 2005)

Microsoft Acts on Antitrust Ruling: Windows Without Media Player to Be Available in Europe (Post, Jan. 25, 2005)

E.U. Orders Microsoft To Modify Windows: One Version Must Omit Media Player (Post, Dec. 23, 2004)

Microsoft Settles With Trade Group (Post, Nov. 25, 2004)

Microsoft Takes Lead in Software For Handhelds: Overall Market Shrinks As Smart Phones Gain (Post, Nov. 13, 2004)

Microsoft Placates Two Foes: Settlements Set For Novell, CCIA (Post, Nov. 9, 2004)

Microsoft E-Mail Looks Like Spam to Some Recipients (Post, Nov. 5, 2004)

Microsoft Profit Up 11%; Forecast Is Mixed (Post, Oct. 22, 2004)

Microsoft Releases New 'Critical' Patches (TechNews.com, Oct. 12, 2004; 6:57 PM)

Monti Reflects On Evolution Of Antitrust: E.U. Regulator Had A Turbulent Tenure (Post, Oct. 7, 2004)

Microsoft Judge Skeptical: E.U. Order on Media Player Questioned (Post, Oct. 2, 2004)

E.U. Regulators Say Microsoft Had Agreed to Sanctions: Court Weighs Whether to Delay Penalties (Post, Oct. 1, 2004)

Microsoft Crafts Backup Plan (Post, Sept. 28, 2004)

Microsoft Takes Stands Against Spam, Sanctions (Post, Sept. 23, 2004)

Microsoft to Share Source Code With Governments (Post, Sept. 21, 2004)

Melinda Gates Joins Washington Post Co. as Director: Ex-Microsoft Executive Elected to Board (Post, Sept. 10, 2004)

Microsoft's Homeland Security Efforts (Live Online, Aug. 31, 2004; 11:00 AM)

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