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In North Carolina, Small Racing Boats Make a Big Splash

By Erik Schelzig
Special to The Washington Post
Wednesday, April 11, 2001

As the early morning mist lifted off North Carolina's placid Pasquotank river, brothers Dave and Gary Augustine strapped me into a full body, Kevlar-weave rip suit and life jacket. I lowered myself into the snug cockpit, still fiddling with a latch on my high-visibility orange helmet. Dave rattled off instructions on how to handle this small outboard powerboat, most of which I didn't understand, landlubber that I am. It was not much bigger than a surfboard; but its 350cc engine pushes it through the water more like a dragster.

"And remember, don't try to turn right," Dave said, pull-starting the motor. The vessel lurched forward before I could ask him why.

As the boat picked up speed, l shifted my weight forward to help bring the boat up onto a plane. Kneeling in the foot-wide driver's area, I gripped the steering wheel with my right hand and pulled the throttle lever with my left. Here goes. I pointed the boat downriver and squeezed the throttle. The craft gathered speed so furiously I could barely utter three or four select curse words before I had to cut the gas and turn around, a few hundred yards from where I'd started.

These particular outboard-motored boats, known as kneel-down hydros, can almost literally fly. If you know what you're doing, little other than the propeller hits the water on the straightaways. At full steam on a calm river, the sensation is kind of like running in socks on a freshly waxed kitchen floor, with only an illusion of control, and the sense that you couldn't stop if you wanted to. As the hull skids above the water, a rooster-tail of water rises high behind the boat as a testament to this gravity-defying act.

If you don't know what you're doing, however, things can get pretty ugly: If you try to turn right at speed, you are likely to be violently flipped out of your boat, as they are designed only for the full-speed left-hand turns on their counterclockwise courses. If you do flip into the racing water, the Kevlar rip suit is there to protect your flesh from the screaming propeller of a competitor's boat. I was surprised -- and a bit frightened -- at how casually the Augustines invited a lubber like me into the cockpit.

The amateur powerboat races held each spring and fall near the one-stoplight town of Camden, N.C. -- a couple of miles north of Elizabeth City -- bookend the summer powerboat season. Regional outboard and inboard races will take place in coming weeks in Maryland (Denton, Cambridge, Kent Narrows, Baltimore), Virginia (Hampton) and New Jersey (Millville, West Milford). (See box for details.)

My wife and I had pulled into our Elizabeth City motel one midnight last year for our first view of small-boat racing. We had a hard time finding a parking spot between the pickup trucks with boat trailers, which the chain-smoking receptionist in the lobby blamed on a bass fishing tournament going on that day. She called me "Hon" and checked us in.

In the morning, I was waved into a makeshift parking lot near the river where ours was just about the only sedan among pickups, SUVs and trailers, with license plates from as far away as Texas, Alabama and Massachusetts. At waterside, it was a festive, family scene. Around the "pits" (really just improvised boat stands on the river bank), children and dogs chased each other in and out of hiding places and a local Boy Scout troop had set up a concession stand selling coffee and hot chocolate to the morning crowd. It would have seemed like any other tranquil riverside weekend, except that the socializing was intermittently shattered by the squeal of revving engines as the teams fine-tuned their race boats.

Most had come expressly for the races, but this area attracts all manner of waterside tourists. Nearby is the Great Dismal Canal, which runs through the swamp of the same name and connects these waters to the Chesapeake Bay in Virginia. It is the oldest continuously operated canal in the United States and forms part of the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway. During the races, the Coast Guard blocks off traffic on the river, allowing boats to pass the race only between race segments.

After the Augustines allowed me my tiny test run around the buoy-marked one-mile oval, the real heats got underway. As I waited for my knees to stop shaking, the hard-core outboard boat race enthusiasts on the shore started paying attention to the action on the water.

Given the signal to assemble for the start, a dozen boats shot out of the pits like a swarm of bees, circling around the course and assembling toward the start of the straightaway. Racers try to time their flying starts across the line at full speed just as the oversize clock counts down to zero. Passing the line too early results in disqualification; passing it too late gives the advantage to your competitor. Top speeds for the various categories range from 45 mph in the Junior class for ages 9 to 14, to more than 100 mph in the modified engine and fuels categories. Following the furious start, the boats crammed around the first turn, with little other than little orange helmets poking out between the rooster tails of water rising around the boats.

Racers earn points based on the order they finish, and the winners of a given class of outboard are designated based on the aggregate point total from two heats. Individual weekend race results add up to national point standings.

Dave Augustine took my test boat out in the second race of the day, promptly got off to a slow start, and then punctured an inflatable buoy, which clung comically to the front of the boat as he completed the race toward the back of the pack.

"I had a bad engine, bad start and couldn't turn," Dave explained later. "Other than that, everything was great!"

Outboard boat racing traces its roots back to the 1930s when production outboard motors first became available. The sport saw its heyday in the 1950s and 1960s, which is when the Augustines, who are part of a Washington area family of patent searchers, built their first outboard racer. Since then, the Augustines have had up to four generations racing at one time. Currently, Augustine siblings, cousins, children and wives race, manage, referee, keep score and man the rescue boat.

But the sport has come upon harder times lately, as the appeal in watersports has shifted from handmade power boats to mass-produced personal watercraft. Annandale resident Bill Huson has been involved in outboard racing since the 1980s and has watched the sport become more specialized, but also increasingly obscure. "This is not a turnkey operation," says Huson of the sport's demands for investment and training. Unlike Jet Skis, which novices simply launch and drive, outboard powerboats require endless tuning, maintenance and finesse. One false move and the engine can blow, or the boat can lift out of the water and flip over backward. A full tank of gas will last almost exactly the duration of the three laps, and you don't need a helmet and the lightweight equivalent of body armor to ride a Jet Ski.

Meanwhile, as the racers were finishing on the water, the meal was being prepared on the shore. Precisely 497 pounds of pork were roasting in three oil drum-size cookers -- all this and trimmings for a crowd of about 300 people. As darkness fell, the intense competitive rush of the races gave way to the mellow calm of the evening. The younger fans and racers began assembling material for a bonfire for the post-race festivities, and the older crowd started gravitating toward the refrigerated trailer full of beer kegs.

The Augustines, meanwhile, opened a couple of bottles of wine near the faded Augustine Racing Team sign on their boat trailer, and toasted each other on a day that was, if not victorious, at least a whole lot of fun. And they began planning for the next one.

Escape Keys

GETTING THERE: Camden and Elizabeth City are just south of the Great Dismal Swamp, near the North Carolina-Virginia border. Take I-95 south to I-64 east at Richmond, then U.S. 17 south from Norfolk to Elizabeth City. Drive east on Route 158 to Camden's only traffic light. Turn left onto Route 343 for about 2.5 miles, and left again onto Shipyard Landing Road, which quickly turns to gravel and leads straight to the pits.

THE RACES: This year's Camden, N.C., races on the Pasquotank River are April 21-22. Races are scheduled at Kent Narrows, Md., April 28-29, at the Choptank River Yacht Club in Denton, Md., July 14-15, and elsewhere in the Chesapeake Bay area through the summer. See a schedule and information on local racing clubs at the Web site of the American Power Boat Association at www.apba.org.

STAYING THERE: Camping is free along the riverside during the event. In Elizabeth City, the generic Albemarle Inn (306 S. Hughes Blvd., 252-338-8900) and Holiday Inn (522 S. Hughes Blvd., 252-338-3951) offer basic accommodations for around $50 per night. Bring beach chairs, earplugs, sunscreen -- and about $2,000 if you want to buy a used, race-ready outboard boat.

EATING: If concession stand fare at the races is not for you, Mulligan's Waterfront Grille, at 400 S. Water St. in Elizabeth City (252-331-2431), offers wharf-side dining outside of earshot of races. Entrees range from $6 to $26 for hefty portions.

INFO: The Elizabeth City Chamber of Commerce, 252-335-4365, www.elizcity.com.

GETTING THERE: Camden and Elizabeth City are just south of the Great Dismal Swamp, near the North Carolina-Virginia border. Take I-95 south to I-64 east at Richmond, then U.S. 17 south from Norfolk to Elizabeth City. Drive east on Route 158 to Camden's only traffic light. Turn left onto Route 343 for about 2.5 miles, and left again onto Shipyard Landing Road, which quickly turns to gravel and leads straight to the pits.

THE RACES: This year's Camden, N.C., races on the Pasquotank River are April 21-22. Races are scheduled at Kent Narrows, Md., April 28-29, at the Choptank River Yacht Club in Denton, Md., July 14-15, and elsewhere in the Chesapeake Bay area through the summer. See a schedule and information on local racing clubs at the Web site of the American Power Boat Association at www.apba.org.

STAYING THERE: Camping is free along the riverside during the event. In Elizabeth City, the generic Albemarle Inn (306 S. Hughes Blvd., 252-338-8900) and Holiday Inn (522 S. Hughes Blvd., 252-338-3951) offer basic accommodations for around $50 per night. Bring beach chairs, earplugs, sunscreen -- and about $2,000 if you want to buy a used, race-ready outboard boat.

EATING: If concession stand fare at the races is not for you, Mulligan's Waterfront Grille, at 400 S. Water St. in Elizabeth City (252-331-2431), offers wharf-side dining outside of earshot of races. Entrees range from $6 to $26 for hefty portions.

INFO: The Elizabeth City Chamber of Commerce, 252-335-4365, www.elizcity.com.

© 2001 The Washington Post Company