Foo Fighters' Grohl Proves He Can Kerry a Torch

By Richard Leiby
Washington Post Staff Writer
Tuesday, April 26, 2005

Foo Fighters frontman Dave Grohl pays tribute to defeated presidential candidate John Kerry with the title of the band's new two-disc album, "In Your Honor," due in June. The title was inspired by campaigning for Kerry, the singer-guitarist says in the new issue of Rolling Stone, but adds, "It's not a political record."

"We'd pull into small towns, and thousands of people would come to be rescued by this man," Grohl, 36, tells the magazine. The Kerry camp returned the compliment in a statement yesterday describing Grohl, the former District punk band drummer who was a member of Nirvana, as a "hero" on the campaign trail who "inspired a record number of young voters" to support the Democratic senator.

Furthermore, spokeswoman Katharine Lister tells us that Kerry, a one-time high school bass player, "is ready to return the favor and go on tour with Dave Grohl and open for the Foo Fighters anytime."

Grohl's boyhood in Vienna was another influence on the album. A cut featuring piano and vocals by Norah Jones is titled "Virginia Moon." And on "Still," Grohl references an incident from when he was 10 and a boy committed suicide on the train tracks.

"After the ambulances split, we found pieces of his skull and played with his bones," the musician told Rolling Stone. Creepy? Perhaps, but of the song Grohl also said: "I couldn't believe that our band is capable of making something so beautiful."

A New Twist on the Grip-and-Grin

President Bush shows Saudi Crown Prince Abdullah around his ranch.
President Bush shows Saudi Crown Prince Abdullah around his ranch.
Hands-on approach: In case you're wondering, President Bush was following an Arab custom that denotes close friendship when he walked hand in hand with Saudi Crown Prince Abdullah after they exchanged greetings in Crawford, Tex., yesterday.

"It's a sign of respect and affection -- nothing sexual whatsoever," Saudi spokesman Nail Jubeir informed us from the scene.

It turns out that the pair previously held hands at two summits. And yesterday Bush also kissed the Saudi leader on both cheeks.

Hey, we're for anything that lowers the price of gas.

Vital Voices Famous Faces

Powerhouse women in media and politics join with actresses Sally Field and Julia Ormond tonight at the Kennedy Center to bestow honors on their courageous sisters from around the globe at the annual gala for Vital Voices, a global women's advocacy group. "I spent the whole last summer at the Kennedy Center," Field tells us, referring to her role as Amanda in its production of "The Glass Menagerie," "so I feel like I'm coming home."

Sally Field with Jason Butler Harner in last year's
Sally Field with Jason Butler Harner in last year's "Glass Menagerie."
Sens. Hillary Clinton and Kay Bailey Hutchison, honorary Vital Voices co-chairmen, will be there, along with Elizabeth Cheney, who'll be a presenter, and Madeleine Albright, who'll make remarks. Among the honorees: Latifa Jbabdi , a Moroccan social reformer; Jaya Arunachalam, an advocate for poor working women in India; and Sochua Mu , Cambodia's former minister of women's and veterans affairs. And the women of Ukraine are being honored for their "leadership in civil society during the recent demonstrations to protest the fraudulent elections and to save their democracy," Vital Voices Chairman Melanne Verveer tells us. "One of the women, Natalia Dimitruk , was a signer to the deaf on state-run television and ended a broadcast by signing that the election was a fraud, contrary to what they were told to say."

Celebs frequently breeze through Washington to bang the drum for causes, and Field says: "It's important if you have the ability to make things more visible that need to be more visible, then it really is your responsibility as a citizen to stand up and say 'Attention must be paid,' in the words of Arthur Miller ." And, she reminds us with a laugh, "Actors are citizens."

With Anne Schroeder

Vital Voices Famous Faces

? Powerhouse women in media and politics join with actresses Sally Field and Julia Ormond tonight at the Kennedy Center to bestow honors on their courageous sisters from around the globe at the annual gala for Vital Voices, a global women's advocacy group. "I spent the whole last summer at the Kennedy Center," Field tells us, referring to her role as Amanda in its production of "The Glass Menagerie," "so I feel like I'm coming home."

Sens. Hillary Clinton and Kay Bailey Hutchison , honorary Vital Voices co-chairmen, will be there, along with Elizabeth Cheney, who'll be a presenter, and Madeleine Albright, who'll make remarks. Among the honorees: Latifa Jbabdi , a Moroccan social reformer; Jaya Arunachalam , an advocate for poor working women in India; and Sochua Mu , Cambodia's former minister of women's and veterans affairs. And the women of Ukraine are being honored for their "leadership in civil society during the recent demonstrations to protest the fraudulent elections and to save their democracy," Vital Voices Chairman Melanne Verveer tells us. "One of the women, Natalia Dimitruk , was a signer to the deaf on state-run television and ended a broadcast by signing that the election was a fraud, contrary to what they were told to say."

Celebs frequently breeze through Washington to bang the drum for causes, and Field says: "It's important if you have the ability to make things more visible that need to be more visible, then it really is your responsibility as a citizen to stand up and say 'Attention must be paid,' in the words of Arthur Miller ." And, she reminds us with a laugh, "Actors are citizens."

With Anne Schroeder


© 2005 The Washington Post Company