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Wednesday, April 27, 2005

Kenneth Burton Slater, 87, a retired cornetist and conductor involved in Washington area groups, died of a heart ailment April 14 at a hospital in Indianapolis. He moved to Indianapolis from Hagerstown in 1997.

Mr. Slater, who was born in Cohoes, N.Y., was a graduate of New York Military Academy in Cornwall-on-Hudson, N.Y. His father was a euphonium soloist in Arthur Pryor's concert band.

From 1937 to 1947, Mr. Slater played in the U.S. Marine Band, known as "the President's Own." He then spent a decade with the newly formed U.S. Army Field Band, based at Fort Meade.

During the 1950s, he conducted the Almas Temple Band in Washington. The group won the National Shrine Band competition in 1955.

He conducted the Hagerstown Municipal Band in the 1960s and early 1970s. In recent years, he was a frequent guest conductor of the Virginia Grand Military Band in Arlington.

Mr. Slater composed several works, including "Mohawk View" and "Almas on Parade."

Survivors include his wife of 63 years, Evelyn Fey Slater of Indianapolis.

Jennifer Joy TomkinsJournalist

Jenny Tomkins, 50, real estate editor for the Washington Examiner and an international business reporter, died of a stroke April 24 at her home in Fairfax.

Mrs. Tomkins had worked for the Examiner since December. Previously she was with Bloomberg News and launched the Washington bureau of a German financial news wire service.

She was born in Manly, New South Wales, Australia, and spent her childhood on a sheep ranch before moving to Queensland. She graduated from Queensland University and went to work in 1978 in Hong Kong for Unicom News, the business wire of United Press International. Her father ran the Hong Kong Yacht Club.

In 1983, she was transferred to London, where she became the first female reporter on the floor of the London Metals Exchange before returning to Hong Kong with her husband, also a journalist.

Her family moved to the United States in 1991, where she opened the Washington bureau for Vereinigte Wirtschaftsdienste GmbH, the German financial news service. After a brief stint with Reuters news service, she joined Bloomberg News as an international trade reporter and covered the major trade initiatives of the Clinton administration.


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