Latest Entry: The RSS feed for this blog has moved

Washington Post staff writers offer a window into the art of obituary writing, the culture of death, and more about the end of the story.

Read more | What is this blog?

More From the Obits Section: Search the Archives  |   RSS Feeds RSS Feed   |   Submit an Obituary  |   Twitter Twitter

John van Hengel Dies at 83; Founded 1st Food Bank in 1967

John van Hengel is shown in 2003 at St. Mary's Food Bank in Phoenix. The operation was the first of its kind when Mr. van Hengel opened it in 1967. In its first year, St. Mary's distributed more than 250,000 pounds of food to 36 charities.
John van Hengel is shown in 2003 at St. Mary's Food Bank in Phoenix. The operation was the first of its kind when Mr. van Hengel opened it in 1967. In its first year, St. Mary's distributed more than 250,000 pounds of food to 36 charities. (By Tom Tingle -- Arizona Republic Via Associated Press)

Network News

X Profile
View More Activity
By Patricia Sullivan
Washington Post Staff Writer
Saturday, October 8, 2005

John van Hengel, 83, a soup-kitchen volunteer who founded the first food bank in 1967 with a truckload of produce gleaned from Arizona farm fields and citrus groves, died Oct. 5 at a hospice in Phoenix. He had Parkinson's disease.

His idea grew into a nationwide network of food banks that converts food industry leftovers into meals for the poor. That network, America's Second Harvest, distributes 2 billion pounds of groceries that feed 23 million Americans every year. In the past several years, Mr. van Hengel helped start food banks in Europe, Africa, Asia and Latin America.

Soup kitchens and community food pantries have existed for more than a century, but the idea of a food bank took those modest local efforts and made them bigger and more reliable.

Mr. van Hengel credited his seminal idea to a woman with 10 children and a husband on death row. She rummaged for food in refuse bins behind grocery stores and suggested that what was really needed was a place to both deposit food and check it out -- like a bank.

At the time, Mr. van Hengel was barely more than indigent himself. His clothes came from the Salvation Army; he ate at the soup kitchen where he volunteered; and his home was an apartment above a garage. "At 44, I was the oldest public pools lifeguard in Phoenix," he told the Los Angeles Times in 1992.

"He's an ordinary man, complete with vices and sins and mistakes and all the other things all of us possess," Robert Forney, president and chief executive of America's Second Harvest, said yesterday. "He discovered how to tie together the public and private sectors in a common, aligned battle against hunger."

The key was creating a distribution network that convinced corporations that their donated food would be safely handled and would not be resold, Forney said. In addition, businesses were able to cut the costs of disposing or storing unusable food, take a tax break and satisfy multiple charities through a single point of contact.

Born in Waupun, Wis., Mr. van Hengel graduated from Lawrence University in Appleton, Wis. He attended the University of Wisconsin graduate school but left for Southern California before earning a degree. He called himself a "first-rate beach bum," although he eventually went back to school at UCLA to study broadcasting.

He worked as a magazine publicist, an advertising man, a designer of plastic rainwear, a restaurant maitre d' and a beer-truck driver in Hollywood, he told the Los Angeles Times in 1992. He married a model and became a division sales manager for a manufacturer of archery gear. In 1960, his marriage to Beverlee Thompson ended in divorce, and he headed back to Wisconsin. She survives him, as do two sons, John van Hengel of Kansas City, Kan., and Thomas van Hengel of Scottsdale, Ariz.

Mr. van Hengel went to work in a rock quarry, got into a fight at a factory and had spinal surgery that left him with a locked neck, palsy and bad legs. Hoping to improve his health in a warm, dry climate, he moved to Arizona and began swimming laps at a YMCA and reading the Bible.

Working at a soup kitchen in Phoenix, Mr. van Hengel met the mother of 10 and searched in supermarket refuse bins himself. Finding edible, if not salable, food, he persuaded a grocery store manager, and then the manager's boss, to donate surplus food. Soon he and his helpers had more food than they could use. The excess went to missions, alcoholism treatment centers and abused women's shelters.

"It got to the point where we were getting so much that it was killing me because I was having to deliver the produce in the evening after we finished picking it," he told the Chicago Tribune in 1988.


CONTINUED     1        >

More in the Obituary Section

Post Mortem

Post Mortem

The art of obituary writing, the culture of death, and more about the end of the story.

From the Archives

From the Archives

Read Washington Post obituaries and view multimedia tributes to Pope John Paul II, Ronald Reagan, James Brown and more.

[Campaign Finance]

A Local Life

This weekly feature takes a more personal look at extraordinary people in the D.C. area.

© 2005 The Washington Post Company

Network News

X My Profile
View More Activity