When Road Rage Turns Tragic

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Monday, October 24, 2005

Over the past decade, aggressive driving in the Washington area often has resulted in mayhem and, in several cases, tragedy. Some examples:

APRIL 17, 1996 -- Narkey Keval Terry and Billy M. Canipe Jr., both 26, engage in a high-speed, seven-mile duel along George Washington Memorial Parkway in Virginia until they crash near McLean. Canipe is killed, as are two motorists not involved in the dispute. Terry, convicted of involuntary manslaughter and reckless driving, is sentenced to 10 years in prison.

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SEPT. 4, 1998 -- Charles F. Carson, 33, driving an Acura Legend, becomes involved in what authorities later call "a cat-and-mouse chase" with the driver of a Mercury on the Capital Beltway. The incident begins on the outer loop near Alexandria and ends in Prince George's County, where someone in the Mercury leans out a window and fires a shot into the Acura, killing Carson.

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JULY 4, 2001 -- Mark A. Blowe, 46, is exiting the Beltway at Interstate 66 in Virginia when he begins tailgating a car driven by Bryan E. Johnson, 52, a violinist for the National Symphony Orchestra. After Blowe twice cuts in front of Johnson and suddenly brakes, Johnson crashes into a concrete barrier and is killed. Blowe, convicted of involuntary manslaughter, is sentenced to 3 1/2 years in prison.

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APRIL 6, 2003 -- After motorist Phillip Hansberry, 41, collides with a car driven by Clifton E. Stokes, 53, on Marlboro Pike in Prince George's, Hansberry drags Stokes onto the street and beats him to death in front of witnesses. An off-duty police officer shoots and kills Hansberry. Autopsies show that Hansberry was under the influence of a violence-inducing drug and that Stokes was drunk.

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OCT. 29, 2004 -- Ryan T. Stowers, 20, a Navy seaman, is driving drunk when he becomes involved in a traffic dispute on Rockville Pike with Arthur L. Lloyd, 54, a deputy U.S. marshal. After they pull into a parking lot, their argument leads to a fistfight, and Lloyd fatally shoots Stowers in what he later claims was self-defense. Lloyd, convicted of voluntary manslaughter, gets a 10-year prison term.


© 2005 The Washington Post Company

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