Senate Presses for Concrete Steps Toward Drawdown of Troops in Iraq

By Shailagh Murray and Jonathan Weisman
Washington Post Staff Writers
Wednesday, November 16, 2005; Page A01

Reflecting heightened public anxiety over the Iraq war, the Senate yesterday issued its most direct challenge yet to President Bush's handling of the conflict, as it pressed for concrete steps toward troop withdrawals and a requirement for the White House to provide more information on military operations.

By a vote of 79 to 19, the Senate approved a resolution designating 2006 as "a period of significant transition to full Iraqi sovereignty . . . thereby creating the conditions for the phased redeployment of United States forces from Iraq." It would also require the White House to submit to Congress an unclassified report every 90 days detailing U.S. policy and military operations.


US soldiers block a highway after a road side bomb exploded in Al-Baladyaat district, targeting a patrol of the Iraqi army, in Baghdad, Iraq, Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2005. According to Iraqi police four people were injured by the blast. (AP Photo/Hadi Mizban)
US soldiers block a highway after a road side bomb exploded in Al-Baladyaat district, targeting a patrol of the Iraqi army, in Baghdad, Iraq, Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2005. According to Iraqi police four people were injured by the blast. (AP Photo/Hadi Mizban) (Hadi Mizban - AP)

The resolution was offered by Republican leaders after the Senate rejected a Democratic resolution, 58 to 40, that would have pressured the administration to outline a plan to draw down U.S. forces in Iraq. On that vote, five Democrats voted with the GOP majority, while only one Republican -- Lincoln D. Chafee (R.I.) -- voted yes. Democrats have moved aggressively to challenge Bush over how the United States went to war and how the war can be brought to an end.

At a news conference in Kyoto, Japan, where he is on an Asian tour, Bush said he saw the development back in Washington as "a positive step," since the Senate rejected the Democratic amendment. As for the final language, he said, "I view this as an amendment consistent with our strategy and look forward to continuing to work with the Congress." The required reports, he added, "we're more than willing to do. That's to be expected."

Despite the partisan nature of the final votes, the day's debate reflected clear unease in both parties about the administration's Iraq policy -- and a new willingness by the Senate to insist that Bush provide more clarity on how he intends to exit Iraq.

The weaker GOP measure was added to a defense policy reauthorization bill, along with other provisions that would codify the treatment of military detainees and establish new legal rights for terrorism suspects. One of those provisions, sponsored by Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.), would establish strict guidelines for interrogation of suspected terrorists. Another would dramatically alter U.S. policy for treating captured terrorism suspects by granting them a final recourse to the federal courts but stripping them of some key legal rights.

The Senate approved the overall legislation by 98 to 0. A final compromise must be reached with the House, but the bipartisan Senate action suggests a potentially pivotal shift, with Republicans and Democrats alike no longer content to follow Bush's lead on the war.

Senate Minority Leader Harry M. Reid (D-Nev.) called the war-related resolution "a vote of no confidence" on Bush's Iraq policies. "Staying the course will not do," Reid said.

However, Majority Leader Bill Frist (R-Tenn.) insisted on the Senate floor that his colleagues were in no way trying to shift administration policy or rebuke the White House. He called such an assessment "absurd" and "ridiculous."

"It's not a change in policy," he said. "It's a continuation of the oversight we've been conducting for years in the United States Senate."

Armed Services Committee Chairman John W. Warner (R-Va.), who wrote the Republican version, called it a "forward-looking" reflection of the high stakes in Iraq over the coming months. On Dec. 15, Iraqis are to vote on a new parliament, and the Bush administration hopes the election will herald a new era of stability in the country, he said.

Rank-and-file Republicans concede the political atmosphere is changing. Sen. Mike DeWine (Ohio), who faces a tough reelection bid in a state with marked misgivings about the war, said he is pleased to see the Senate engaging the White House on war policy, and predicted the trend would grow more pronounced. "This is the way it should be," DeWine said. "We should be involved."


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