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Man at Eagles Game Says He Was Spreading Mom's Ashes

Ronaldinho, a Brazilian midfielder for Barcelona, kisses the Golden Ball trophy, which he was awarded as European soccer player of the year.
Ronaldinho, a Brazilian midfielder for Barcelona, kisses the Golden Ball trophy, which he was awarded as European soccer player of the year. (By Christophe Ena -- Associated Press)

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Tuesday, November 29, 2005

A man arrested for running onto the field during the Philadelphia Eagles' game against the Green Bay Packers on Sunday told police he was spreading his late mother's ashes.

Christopher Noteboom , of Tempe, Ariz., ran onto the field holding a plastic bag, leaving a cloud of fine powder behind.

As he reached the 30-yard line, he dropped to his knees, made the sign of the cross and laid down on his stomach. Security personnel reached him moments later and he offered no resistance as he was escorted from the field.

Noteboom, a native of Doylestown, Pa., said his mother died of emphysema in January 2005.

"She never cared for any other team except the Eagles," Noteboom told WPVI-TV after he was released from custody yesterday. "I know that the last handful of ashes I had are laying on the field, and will never be taken away. She'll always be part of Lincoln Financial Field and of the Eagles."

Noteboom was charged with defiant trespass. He has a hearing scheduled for Dec. 27.

"It's bizarre, but we have a zero tolerance for people who run on the field," Police Inspector William Colarulo said. "We especially have a zero tolerance for people who run onto the field and dump an unknown substance in a stadium full of people."

Spokeswoman Bonnie Grant said the Eagles have declined previous requests to spread ashes on the field.

TENNIS: Instant replay probably will be used at next year's U.S. Open to resolve disputed line calls.

Tournament committee member Jim Courier put the chances of the Open using the technology at "90 percent," and said implementation of instant replay is overdue in the sport.

"I think that's what we need to do to catch tennis up to the rest of the world of sport," he said. "This is a step in the right direction."


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