NAMES & FACES

Joaquin Phoenix, here portraying Johnny Cash at Folsom State Prison in
Joaquin Phoenix, here portraying Johnny Cash at Folsom State Prison in "Walk the Line," will screen the film there tomorrow. (By Suzanne Tenner -- 20Th Century Fox Via Associated Press)
Monday, January 2, 2006

Trouble Finds 'Lost' Actress

Will "Lost" star Michelle Rodriguez end up marooned after her latest mishap? Check back in the spring.

Following her arrest on suspicion of drunk driving in Honolulu on Dec. 1, the county attorney's office in Los Angeles said on Thursday that the 27-year-old actress could face 18 months in prison for a probation violation, People reported on its Web site Friday.

After a DUI arrest in November 2003 and one for hit-and-run the previous year, both in the Los Angeles area, Rodriguez was sentenced to 36 months of probation.

Last month in Hawaii, Rodriguez and fellow "Lost" cast member Cynthia Watros , 37, were pulled over within 15 minutes of each other in separate cars and booked on DUI charges. Both appeared for arraignment in Honululu's Kaneohe District Court on Thursday.

Watros's lawyer, Lanson Kupau , said the actress would plead guilty at a Jan. 12 hearing: "She's very remorseful, and she wants to take responsibility for her actions."

A probation hearing for Rodriguez will be set after her March 30 trial date in Honolulu.

Rapper Trice Draws Gunfire

Obie Trice , a Motor City rapper signed to Eminem 's Shady Records, was treated and released from a Detroit hospital after being shot at in his car Saturday morning, the Associated Press reports.

The Detroit rapper's girlfriend, who was riding with him and wasn't wounded, flagged down police after someone fired at them on the Lodge Freeway. Michigan state police said they had no suspects in the shooting.

Trice's debut album, "Cheers," produced by Eminem, was released in 2003. Trice, 28, has made guest appearances on Eminem and 50 Cent albums, and had a small part in the movie "8 Mile."

Obituary for City News

The end of 2005 also marked the end for Chicago's City News, a 24-hour cops-and-crime wire service credited with helping writers Kurt Vo nnegut and Seymour Hersh sharpen their reporting skills early in their careers.

On New Year's Eve, employees of the 19-person news service and fellow mourners crowded into the Billy Goat Tavern, a nearby bar, where yellow crime-scene tape hung from the ceiling.

With the motto "If your mother says she loves you, check it out," the news service founded in 1890 earned a reputation for pushing young reporters to get precise details such as the color of dead infants' eyes and corpses' socks.


CONTINUED     1        >

© 2006 The Washington Post Company