Costly Drugs Force Life-Death Decisions

By JEFF DONN
The Associated Press
Saturday, August 12, 2006; 7:03 PM

-- Dying of lung cancer, Carolyn Hobbs tried a new biotechnology drug that produced an unanticipated side effect: acute sticker shock. She was waiting for her second treatment in a hospital near Denver less than two years ago, when someone from the business office marched in to warn that her share would cost more than $18,000, since the drug wasn't insured for her type of cancer.

How to decide?

In her six decades, she had shared in a long marriage, raised three children, worked in a nursing home, painted as a hobby _ and wasn't ready to leave it all behind. But she was also a careful spender who sometimes returned new clothes to the store, deciding she didn't really need them.

Maybe this new drug, Erbitux, could extend her life by a small fraction, but she wouldn't be cured. "She was just very frugal, and she said it wasn't worth it," her husband Larry remembers.

So she refused the treatment.

More patients are confronting this wrenching decision, as the latest generation of pricier cancer drugs and heart implants stretches out the final months of advanced disease. Is the chance for several more months of life _ maybe a year or more with luck _ precious enough to spend a small fortune? This dilemma is also challenging governments, employers and insurers, who all help finance America's longer life spans and innovative technologies.

Extraordinary care for dying patients can make for inspiring medicine, but its extraordinary costs make it an increasingly debated choice to promote public health. Many economists, doctors, and ethicists say this care too often buys too little for too much _ and that its expanding share of medical resources might better pay for screening and treating diseases in earlier stages.

Already, up to 30 percent of annual payments by federal Medicare insurance go to the 5 percent of members in their last year of life, research shows.

"People still have an underlying belief that there's an infinite amount of resources that can be invested in health care," says Dr. Harlan Krumholz, a Yale University heart specialist who studies quality of care. "But I think we're coming to a realization that we're going to need to confront these issues explicitly."

Maybe so, but any retreat from last-resort care still raises objections from many patients, doctors and medical companies. They denounce "rationing" of care and defend expensive treatments for the dying as a moral imperative.

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Within the last decade, an array of expensive new treatments has given some patients their first real fighting chance against common diseases once routinely called "terminal." These treatments include:


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