White House Vague on Conn. Senate Race

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By ANDREW MIGA
The Associated Press
Monday, August 14, 2006; 9:23 PM

WASHINGTON -- President Bush isn't exactly eager to lend his support to the Republican nominee in Connecticut's tumultuous Senate race.

The White House was circumspect on Monday when asked whether Bush would support Republican Alan Schlesinger in the three-way fall contest that includes Democratic nominee Ned Lamont and three-term incumbent Sen. Joe Lieberman.

"The president supports the democratic process in the state of Connecticut and wishes them a successful election in November," White House spokesman Tony Snow said.

Bush routinely backs Republican candidates in races all across the country.

Lieberman has won praise from the Bush team for his unwavering support of the Iraq war and is seen by some Democrats as too close to the president. He began an independent bid to keep his seat after losing the Democratic primary last week to anti-war challenger and political newcomer Lamont.

Snow was asked whether Bush was balking at supporting Schlesinger because he liked Lieberman _ or wanted to stay out of the contest because Schlesinger was trailing badly in the polls.

"There may be a whole host of reasons the president _ I'm just not going to play," Snow replied.

He suggested the Connecticut race was unique.

"I think that there are some peculiar characteristics going on in the Republican Party with the Republican candidate," Snow said. "And why don't you wait and see what happens?"

Schlesinger said he wasn't surprised by the White House's hesitancy. Republican leaders have been praising Lieberman and now they can't suddenly abandon him, he said.

"I don't think the Republican Party can turn around and say, 'Don't vote for Joe,'" Schlesinger said in a telephone interview. "We've got to let this thing die down a little."

Schlesinger said he was confident he could move up in the polls once some of the attention shifted away from the Lieberman-Lamont primary fight.


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© 2006 The Associated Press

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