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U.S. Amends Account of Iraq Blasts

In Mosul, a suicide bomber drove into the headquarters of Iraqi President Jalal Talabani's political party on Tuesday, killing at least nine people.
In Mosul, a suicide bomber drove into the headquarters of Iraqi President Jalal Talabani's political party on Tuesday, killing at least nine people. (By Mohammed Ibrahim -- Associated Press)

In the northwest city of Mosul on Tuesday, a suicide bomber drove a Volvo truck into the headquarters of Iraqi President Jalal Talabani's Patriotic Union of Kurdistan, killing at least nine people, including four party members, and wounding 36.

Ghayath Sourchi, a party spokesman, said the attack occurred during a clash between guards at the headquarters and insurgents driving two Opel cars.

"As the firing was going on, the suicide bomber drove his truck into the central court of the headquarters," Sourchi said. "The guards opened fire on the driver, wounding him, but he was able to detonate the explosives-laden truck, inflicting large-scale devastation on the building as well as setting 18 civilian cars on fire." The cars were in line waiting to be supplied with fuel from a nearby gas station, he said.

The Mujaheddin al-Shura Council, a collection of insurgent factions led by the al-Qaeda in Iraq group, asserted responsibility for the attack in a statement posted on an insurgent Web site.

In Baghdad, Jordanian and Iraqi officials signed an agreement under which Iraq will sell oil to neighboring Jordan at steeply discounted prices.

Jordan also offered to host a conference to reconcile Iraq's warring political and religious groups.

"Jordan is Iraq's western lung, and Iraq is Jordan's eastern lung," said Jordanian Prime Minister Marouf al-Bakhit.

Special correspondents K.I. Ibrahim, Saad Sarhan and other Washington Post staff contributed to this report.


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