Correction to This Article
Because of a production error, a portion of the Escapes column in the Oct. 4 Style section was garbled. The description of the Loudoun Wine Trail should have read, "The autumn harvest is a perfect time to sample the local vintage, gaze across rolling hills and join in the autumnal activities at participating wineries." The full article on fall driving routes is available at www.washingtonpost.com/travel.

Leaf the Driving to Us

Roads to make you see red: West Virginia's Highland Scenic Highway is just one promising autumn driving route.
Roads to make you see red: West Virginia's Highland Scenic Highway is just one promising autumn driving route. (Steve Shaluta - West Virginia Department of Commerce)

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Wednesday, October 4, 2006

When the leaves fall, the roads call. So we found 10 country motoring routes where you can see the mid-Atlantic region in its October sweater, a mix of day trips and weekends that incorporate foliage sightseeing, fall festivals and worthy wayside attractions.

For exact driving directions, contact state tourism offices and Web sites listed below. Peak times listed are approximate.

-- Elissa Leibowitz Poma

VIRGINIA

Sign up for weekly fall foliage updates via e-mail on the Virginia Tourism Corp. autumn Web site, http://www.fallinvirginia.org/ . Info: 800-424-5683, http://www.virginia.org/ .

Skyline Drive, Shenandoah National Park

Length: 105 miles.

Peak: Early to mid-October.

Starting point: Pick up Skyline Drive at Front Royal off of Interstate 66, or at Thornton Gap/Route 211 past Sperryville.

The ride: Every Washingtonian should drive through the park in October at least once -- and most seem to do it on the same day. The route is popular because of its proximity to the D.C. area and because, let's face it, Shenandoah is stunning in the fall. Big Meadows, a good resting point, is about midway.

Richmond to Williamsburg

Length: 60 miles.

Peak: Late October.

Starting point: East Main Street in Richmond becomes Route 5 as you head east out of the city.

The ride: Route 5 is a two-lane, wooded road that mostly follows the James River. You'll pass 10 plantations, including the Berkeley and Shirley plantations in Charles City.


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© 2006 The Washington Post Company


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