Pastor Fatally Shot In Prince George's

Tape marks the area outside the Warriors for Christ Ministries in Suitland where the Rev. Milton L. Moore was fatally wounded.
Tape marks the area outside the Warriors for Christ Ministries in Suitland where the Rev. Milton L. Moore was fatally wounded. (Photos By Robert A. Reeder -- The Washington Post)
By Joshua Partlow and Hamil R. Harris
Washington Post Staff Writers
Thursday, December 7, 2006

A well-known Prince George's County minister who runs a transitional home for poor families died yesterday after being gunned down on the steps of his church in the morning.

The Rev. Milton L. Moore was outside the entrance of the Warriors for Christ Ministries in Suitland about 7 a.m. when he was struck in the upper body and bullets shattered a glass door, police and relatives said. He died at 4:25 p.m.

The shooting happened outside the three-story beige brick ministry building at 2420 Brooks Dr., which shares a parking lot with Drew-Freeman Middle School. Vernell Simon, 66, who lives across Brooks Drive from the ministry building, said he heard five or six shots, followed minutes later by sirens.

People inside the ministry building told police that they heard arguing outside before the shots.

Moore, 50, was shot once in the upper body, police said.

"We don't know at this point what the motive is," said Cpl. Diane Richardson, a police spokeswoman. No arrests had been made last night.

Detectives interviewed residents of the building and people who were running on the school track next to the ministry at the time of the shooting.

The ministry, which includes a private transitional home, opened in the late 1990s. The home has a capacity of up to 20 families. Ministry officials kept the shelter open yesterday while they awaited news about Moore's condition.

Several advocates for the homeless in Prince George's said Moore's ministry plays an important role in the county's social safety net and helps people get off the streets until they can find more permanent shelter.

"We had a very close working relationship. He was friendly with everybody," said the Rev. Imogene Stewart, who operates shelters in Prince George's and the District.

The ministry Web site says Moore was "called by God from the womb to minister to the broken hearted, downhearted, dejected, sick, oppressed people -- in other words, to pull them out of the very pits of hell."

He was raised in Albany, Ga., and met his future wife, Eva D. Jackson, when they attended a Baptist church, relatives said.


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