Clinton Cautious on Health Care Reform

Then first lady Hillary Rodham Clinton, holding a copy of the Clinton health-care plan, kicks off a three-state sales campaign during a visit to the Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore in this Oct. 28, 1993 file photo. When it comes to health care reform, Clinton lives by the old adage,
Then first lady Hillary Rodham Clinton, holding a copy of the Clinton health-care plan, kicks off a three-state sales campaign during a visit to the Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore in this Oct. 28, 1993 file photo. When it comes to health care reform, Clinton lives by the old adage, "burned once, twice shy." As first lady in the early 1990s, she tried to reshape the nation's health care system - an audacious effort that collapsed under its own complexity, Republican opposition, and the Clinton's unwillingness to seek compromise with lawmakers. (AP Photo/Joe Marquette, File) (Joe Marquette - AP)

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By BETH FOUHY
The Associated Press
Monday, June 25, 2007; 3:19 AM

NEW YORK -- When it comes to health care reform, Hillary Rodham Clinton epitomizes the old adage, "once burned, twice shy."

As first lady in the early 1990s, she tried to reshape the nation's health care system _ an audacious effort that collapsed under its own complexity, Republican opposition and the Clintons' unwillingness to seek compromise with lawmakers.

"I still have the scars to show for it," she tells voters now, promising a more consensus-based approach to health care reform if she is elected president.

But that newfound caution has also come with a price. While rivals Barack Obama and John Edwards have both laid out sweeping health care reform plans with estimated costs attached, Clinton has so far proposed only modest changes to the existing system while avoiding the vexing question of how to provide coverage for all.

With some 47 million Americans lacking health insurance, the issue has become an urgent priority for Democratic primary voters and for organized labor, a major party constituency. Activists say the time for caution is long past and they want answers from Clinton, the Democratic front-runner.

"One of the problems with being last out of a gate is that it's hard to be seen as leader," said Robert Borosage, president of Campaign for America's Future, a liberal think tank advocating universal coverage. "She has a lot of credibility for taking scars the last time, but she's got a lot of doubters, too. She needs to step up to the bat."

Clinton now says she's learned the hard lessons of 1993, when her husband ignored naysayers and tapped her to lead the President's Task Force on National Health Care Reform.

Toiling behind closed doors with a group of some 500 experts from academia, business and the medical profession, the first lady sought to create a system of "managed competition." Employers, some subsidized by the government, would be pushed to expand health insurance to their workers. Insurance companies would be required to compete for business, thereby reducing costs.

The effort was controversial from the start. Members of Congress complained they were excluded from the process, while Clinton's insistence that the task force meet in secret was successfully challenged in court.

The final plan, more than 1,300 pages long, was decried by Republicans and health care interest groups as socialized medicine and government intervention run amok. The Health Insurance Industry of America ran a devastating $30 million television ad depicting a middle class couple _ "Harry and Louise" _ puzzling over the plan's complexities and worrying about losing the right to choose their own doctors.

The plan was declared dead in late 1994, just weeks before midterm elections that would hand Republicans control of both the House and Senate. Democrats blamed their losses in part on the health care debacle, and Bill Clinton spent his remaining years as president battling a Republican majority on Capitol Hill.

Burned by the experience, Sen. Clinton has since adopted what she calls "the school of small steps."


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© 2007 The Associated Press

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