LIFE IS SHORT | Autobiography as Haiku

LIFE IS SHORT | Autobiography as Haiku

Sunday, February 4, 2007

(Rebecca D'Angelo - For The Washington Post)
"Are you familiar with the word 'fate'?" I ask my high school class of English language learners as we read and discuss a poem. A young man from Afghanistan raises his hand. "It is about what will happen in your future and it is written." I am not surprised that this earnest, introspective student, mature among his peers, is the one who responds. I probe further. "What do you mean that it is written? Where and when?" "Oh, it is on the computer screen," he replies, "at the end of the video game."

Janie Kaplan Alexandria

Here he comes again, my 6-year-old son, to tattle on his 3-year-old sister. "Mommy, mommy!" he says breathlessly, "She said the 'N-word'!" The "N-word"? Where did my son hear that before? How did he even know what that meant? Although I heard the "N-word" all the time when I was growing up, I have made sure that my children have not had the same experience. I racked my brain. Finally, I said to him, "Well, what did she say? What exactly is the 'N-word'?" Wide-eyed, he leaned in close and whispered, "naked!"

(Rebecca D'Angelo - For The Washington Post)
Cheryl Adams Ashburn

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