Spring Arts Preview 2007: Click for special report
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Film Calendar

Nicholas Art and Scarlett Johansson in
Nicholas Art and Scarlett Johansson in "The Nanny Diaries." (By K.C. Bailey/The Weinstein Co.)

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18 -- "Damnation," a rare screening of the 1988 film by the legendary Hungarian director Bela Tarr ("Satantango") in which a recluse falls in love with a cabaret singer and enlists her husband in a smuggling scheme. At the National Gallery of Art.

23 -- "TMNT" stands for Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles and yes, they're back in this cartoon comedy in which they must stop an army of ancient monsters from taking over the world.

23 -- "Color Me Kubrick" stars John Malkovich as a man who posed as legendary director Stanley Kubrick during the filming of "Eyes Wide Shut" despite looking nothing like him. It's a comedy, directed by Brian W. Cook.

23 -- "Black Book" is a World War II thriller about a beautiful Jewish singer (Carice van Houten) who joins the Dutch resistance after her hiding place is destroyed and her escape through liberated territory is foiled. Directed by Paul Verhoeven.

23 -- "An Unreasonable Man" is a documentary about the life and legacy of Ralph Nader, once known as the man who pioneered automotive safety, now famous as the man who many believe got George W. Bush elected in 2000. The film attacks these and other thorny questions regarding, if not an unreasonable man, a complicated one.

23 -- "The Dead Girl" is an ensemble drama by Karen Moncrieff about a lonely caretaker (Toni Collette) who finds a corpse that leads her to a complicated web of intersecting lives. With Brittany Murphy, Mary Beth Hurt and Rose Byrne in performances that have won acclaim in early screenings.

23 -- "Mr. Brooks" is a psychological thriller in which a character played by Kevin Costner is tormented -- and driven to violence -- by his mayhem-loving alter ego, played by William Hurt. It's probably safe to say that everyone's mayhem-loving alter ego is played by William Hurt.

23 -- "Pride" stars Terrence Howard as swim coach Jim Ellis, who in the 1970s created a championship swim team in one of Philadelphia's roughest neighborhoods. Based on a true story.

23 -- "Reign Over Me" stars Adam Sandler and Don Cheadle as college friends who run into each other five years after one has lost his wife on 9/11; meanwhile the other is feeling overwhelmed by his responsibilities as a husband and a father. From Mike Binder ("The Upside of Anger").

23 -- "The Hills Have Eyes II" and didn't we get the point in "The Hills Have Eyes" I? A sequel to the horror hit finds a National Guard unit in New Mexico heading into the hills in response to a distress signal. And those hills have eyes.

23 -- "The Last Mimzy," based on the Lewis Padgett short story, is about two kids who find a cache of toys that, when played with, impart superior intellectual capabilities; the Mimzy in question is a stuffed rabbit. Directed by Bob Shaye, best known as the suit who heads New Line Cinema.

23 -- "The Lookout" marks the directorial debut of hot Hollywood screenwriter Scott Frank, with a crime drama about a teenager whose life is turned upside down after a tragic accident, and who finds himself caught up in a bank heist while working as a janitor.

25 -- "Werckmeister Harmonies" (2000) is Bela Tarr's most recent film, inspired by the real-life 17th-century organist who invented the 12-tone musical scale. A Washington premiere. National Gallery of Art.

30 -- "The Reaping" stars Hilary Swank in a supernatural thriller about a former Christian missionary who loses her faith after her family is killed, then spends the rest of her life disproving religious phenomena. Her co-star is David Morrissey, late of "Basic Instinct 2."

30 -- "Blades of Glory"-- Banned from the men's singles competition, two rival Olympic ice skaters (Will Ferrell and Jon Heder) find a loophole that lets them compete as a pair. Behold, the spandexy outfits!

30 -- "Blind Dating" stars "Just My Luck's" heartthrob Chris Pine as a blind man who finds unlikely love and laughs with a young woman of another culture (Anjali Jay).

30 -- "Meet the Robinsons" tells the story of an orphan who dreams of finding a family, and whose journey takes an unexpected turn when a mysterious stranger named Wilbur Robinson whisks him away to a world where anything is possible. CGI animation. Voiced by Angela Bassett, Tom Selleck and Laurie Metcalf.

30 -- "Rescue Dawn" stars Christian Bale as true-life hero Dieter Dengler, a fighter pilot who was shot down during the Vietnam War and who made a miraculous escape from a prisoner-of-war camp. Warner Herzog -- who made an extraordinary documentary about Dengler called "Little Dieter Needs to Fly" -- directs. With Steve Zahn and Jeremy Davies.

30 -- "Into Great Silence" is German filmmaker Philip Groening's exploration of the world of silent ritual and reflection, as he takes viewers into a monastery that houses monks who have taken vows of silence. (The film will also be shown at the Goethe-Institut Washington on March 22 as part of the Environmental Film Festival.)

APRIL

TBD-- "Even Money," directed by Mark Rydell ("On Golden Pond"), warns us about the consequences of gambling through interwoven stories about desperate players. The starry cast includes Kim Basinger, Forest Whitaker, Danny DeVito and Kelsey Grammer.

TBD -- "Sunshine," sci-fi thriller from Danny Boyle ("28 Days Later . . ."), takes us into the apocalyptic galaxies 50 years hence, where the dying sun prompts a desperate -- and bumpy -- space mission.

4 -- "Firehouse Dog," this year's love-in for poochniks, is about a top Hollywood dog who gets lost but finds a more meaningful role as the mascot -- and four-legged angel -- of a fire station. The cast includes Josh Hutcherson and Bruce Greenwood.

6 -- "Are We Done Yet?" answers its own question: Ice Cube is not nearly done, with this sequel to the family comedy "Are We There Yet?"

6 -- "First Snow" finds Guy Pearce retracing those paranoid footsteps from "Memento" in this psychological thriller directed by Mark Fergus (who co-scripted "Children of Men").

6 -- "Grindhouse" is actually two films: Quentin Tarantino and Robert Rodriguez salute long afternoons spent at B-movie double bills with Tarantino's slash-'em-up "Death Proof" (starring Kurt Russell as a psycho killer) and Rodriguez's zombies-gone-wild "Planet Terror."

6-- "The Hoax" mines another chapter from the Howard Hughes saga, this one about Clifford Irving (Richard Gere), the writer of a bogus biography of Howard Hughes. It's directed by Lasse Hallstrom ("Chocolat") .

6-- "Severance" is a comedy in which English weapons salesmen playing paintball in the mountains of Eastern Europe end up caught in real crossfire.

6-- "The TV Set" shows us an aspiring TV writer (David Duchovny) who learns a development deal is less than it seems. It's directed by Jake Kasdan, son of Lawrence Kasdan ("The Big Chill").

6 -- "Wedding Daze" looks like a "Wedding Crashers" redux, with a supporting player from that movie, Isla Fisher, playing a waitress proposed to by an unlucky-in-love guy (Jason Biggs) on a dare. Directed by Michael Ian Black ("Ed," "Crank Yankers").

11 -- "Offside," Iranian director Jafar Panahi's satire, tackles gender politics in Iran as a group of rebellious teenage girls don male disguises to illegally attend a soccer game.

13 -- "After the Wedding," from Danish filmmaker Susanne Bier, is about the moral dilemma of a Danish social worker (Mads Mikkelsen) who's offered $4 million to save his flagging orphanage in India -- but with odd stipulations.

13 -- "Disturbia," a thriller, stars Shia LaBeouf ("Holes") as a withdrawn teen living under house arrest who believes he has found a serial killer in the neighborhood. Also features "Matrix" star Carrie-Ann Moss as his mother.

13 -- "Perfect Stranger," a psychological thriller, asks the question, "How far would you go to keep a secret?" The real question may be "How much of Halle Berry will we see vs. Bruce Willis?"

13 -- "Hot Fuzz" -- from Edgar Wright and Simon Pegg, the funny British creators of "Shaun of the Dead" -- is a buddy-cop parody in which two goofy partners uncover dark doings in a seemingly quiet English town. Also features Jim Broadbent.

13 -- "The Invisible" follows the ghostly return of a murdered writer (Justin Chatwin) who's determined to find his killer.

13 -- "Grbavica: The Land of My Dreams" explores the aftereffects of wartime memories on a Bosnian woman and her 12-year-old daughter, living in modern-day Sarajevo. The film won the Berlin Film Festival's Golden Bear last year.

13 -- "Spring Breakdown" follows three lifelong geek-pals (Amy Poehler, Parker Posey and Rachel Dratch) who find themselves reliving the bad old days when they are forced to take care of a teen during spring break.

13 -- "Trade " pulls us into the horrifying world of sex trafficking, where Kevin Kline, playing a Texas cop, joins forces with a Mexican teenager (Cesar Ramos) to trace the boy's missing teenage sister (Paulina Gaitan).

13 -- "Throne of Blood," Akira Kurosawa's 1957 re-imagining of "Macbeth," starring the irrepressible Toshiro Mifune, screens at the AFI Silver Theatre, in conjunction with the Shakespeare in Washington Festival.

13 -- "Year of the Dog" stars Molly Shannon as a dog owner whose grief over her pooch's demise triggers a life transformation. Featuring Regina King, Peter Sarsgaard, John C. Reilly and Laura Dern.

19 -- Filmfest DC, Washington's annual showcase of international and American independent films, gets underway at venues throughout the city. Through April 29.

20 -- "Diggers" is an ensemble dramedy about Long Island clam diggers struggling to maintain their livelihood in the Hamptons.

20 -- "In the Land of Women," the filmmaking debut of Jon Kasdan (another son of Lawrence "The Big Chill" Kasdan), stars "The O.C.'s" Adam Brody as a brokenhearted scriptwriter who returns home to Detroit and develops a special relationship with the family across the street. Featuring Olympia Dukakis and Meg Ryan.

23 -- "Angel-A" stars Rie Rasmussen as a gorgeous Frenchwoman who helps a hustler (Jamel Debbouze) get his life on track in this romantic comedy from Luc Besson (writer, "Fanfan la Tulipe").

20 -- "In the Pit," a documentary by Juan Carlos Rulfo, follows the lives of construction workers as they go about the dirty, dangerous work of building the second level of Mexico City's Periferico freeway.

20 -- "Kickin' It Old Skool" marks the only time you'll read "break dancing" and "Rip Van Winkle" in the same sentence: After 20 years in a coma, a break-dance champ (Jamie Kennedy) from the 1980s learns to get down with this new thing called hip-hop. Cameos from '80s celebs David Hasselhoff, Erik Estrada and Emmanuel Lewis.

20 -- "The Nanny Diaries," from the same-titled best-selling book, follows a working-class Jersey girl (Scarlett Johansson) and her travails as a nanny for a wealthy, dysfunctional Manhattan family (including Laura Linney and Paul Giamatti). Scripted and directed by "American Splendor" filmmakers Shari Springer Berman and Robert Pulcini.

20 -- "Penelope, " a contemporary fairy tale, stars Christina Ricci as a rich young woman whose enormous pig nose is the result of an ancient curse. James McAvoy plays a rich, compulsive gambler who may be the only suitor who can undo her spell.

20 -- "Vacancy" is a creepy peep show in which a married couple (Kate Beckinsale and Luke Wilson) realizes they may be the involuntary stars of their own snuff porn movie.

2 0 -- "The Valet," another comedy from French farce-meister Francis Veber ("La Cage Aux Folles"), is about a philandering billionaire (Daniel Auteuil) and his quest to fool his suspicious wife (Kristin Scott Thomas).

21 -- "Ran," Akira Kurosawa's colorful, 16th-century epic from 1985-- inspired by William Shakespeare's "King Lear" -- stars Tatsuya Nakadai as a warlord who seeks to divide his land among three bickering sons. At AFI Silver Theatre in conjunction with the Shakespeare in Washington Festival. Through April 26.

21-- Tribute to Fanny Ardant, at the National Gallery of Art's East Building, salutes the three-screen partnership of French actress Ardant and director Alain Resnais, with showings of 1983's "Life Is a Bed of Roses," 1984's "Love Unto Death" and 1986's "Mélo." Also screens April 29.

22 -- "Lonesome," a boy-meets-girl-in-Coney-Island story. This 1928 silent film was directed by Hungarian Pál Fejös and screens at the National Gallery of Art's East Building auditorium with live accompaniment by the Alloy Orchestra.

27 -- " Balls of Fury," a comedy directed by Ben Garant of "Reno: 911!," takes us to a world we'd never contemplated: an underground ping-pong tournaments where an FBI agent (Dan Fogler) is on the trail of a murderer played by -- who else? -- Christopher Walken.

27 -- "The Condemned" mixes "Rollerball" with reality TV in this actioner about an American (wrestling pro "Stone Cold" Steve Austin) who's sprung from a Central American prison only to find himself an involuntary gladiator for Internet viewers.

27 -- "Death at a Funeral," a farce starring Matthew Macfadyen ("Pride and Prejudice"), Peter Dinklage and Ewen Bremner, centers around a family funeral and the threatened revelation of an embarrassing family secret.

27 -- "Fracture," a cat-and-mouse drama, stars Ryan Gosling ("Half Nelson") as a young district attorney bedeviled by a manipulative man (Anthony Hopkins) who beats an attempted murder charge on a technicality.

27 -- "The Hip Hop Project," a documentary, follows homeless-teen-turned-activist Chris "Kazi" Rolle as he inspires other New York City youth to use hip-hop music and group therapy as positive outlets.

27 -- "Jindabyne," an Australian psychodrama inspired by a Raymond Carver short story, examines issues of guilt and honesty when a husband (Gabriel Byrne) hides crucial information about a murdered woman from his wife (Laura Linney).

27 -- "Pathfinder," an action adventure, examines the cultural transformation of a Viking (Karl Urban) after he is captured by a Native American tribe during a Norse raid.

27 -- "The Rules of the Game," the 1939 film directed by Jean Renoir, is considered by some to be the greatest film ever made. This assured tragicomedy of manners that satirized the petty bourgeois of France was banned there for decades, for what censors deemed its neutral moral stance.

28 -- "Two or Three Things About Her," Jean-Luc Godard's engaging 1967 paean to Paris and the movie's central character, Juliette (Marina Vlady), screens at AFI Silver Theatre.

MAY

TBD -- "The Golden Door," a modern fable by Emanuele Crialese ("Respiro"), follows a Sicilian farming family as it makes the difficult decision to leave their village for America. Charlotte Gainsbourg plays a British woman who befriends them on the way to Ellis Island.

TBD -- John Wayne Centennial Celebration, a retrospective at AFI Silver, honors the American actor's 100th birthday with selections from six decades of movies.

4 -- "Away From Her" stars Julie Christie as an aging woman coping with the early warning signs of Alzheimer's disease. This adaptation of Alice Munro's short story "The Bear Came Over the Mountain" is actress Sarah Polley's directing debut.

4 -- "Lucky You" turns poker into a metaphor for life and vice versa, as card player Eric Bana must get over his longtime enmity towards his card-playing father (Robert Duvall) so he can win big -- metaphor alert -- at the game of love (with Drew Barrymore).

4 -- "The Page Turner," a French film, reveals life's mystical circles, when a young woman (Déborah Francois), whose piano playing career was destroyed by the thoughtless actions of a music judge (Catherine Frot), finds herself -- years later -- becoming the older woman's page turner.

4 -- "Spider-Man 3" throws Spidey (Tobey Maguire) into a webby dilemma: How to exploit the dark powers of his mysterious new suit to whup the villainous Sandman (Thomas Haden Church) and Venom (Topher Grace), yet retain his dwindling humanity as alter ego Peter Parker. Sam Raimi directs a third time; Kirsten Dunst returns as Mary Jane.

5 -- "Seventh Heaven" marked the first Academy Award for Best Actress -- given to Janet Gaynor for her roles in three films including this 1927 silent romance. The screening is accompanied by a new score by composer Dennis James, at the National Gallery of Art's East Building auditorium.

11 -- "Delta Farce" air-drops Larry the Cable Guy over Mexico. The standup comedian plays an unsuspecting reservist who thinks he's headed for Iraq only to find himself tangling with a Mexican warlord (Danny Trejo) across a more local border.

11 -- " Georgia Rule" finds Lindsay Lohan really, uh, stretching as a hard-drinking hellion who's sent away to her God-fearing Midwestern grandmother (Jane Fonda) to get over herself. Felicity Huffman plays Lohan's exasperated mother.

11 -- "28 Weeks Later"-- a sequel to 2002's "28 Days Later," but without its helmer Danny Boyle or lead cast -- picks up six months after an apocalyptic virus has destroyed Great Britain. Refugees return only to learn one of them still has the deadly bug.

13 -- Czech Modernism, a series of Czech films of the 1920s through the 1940s, screens over several weekends at the National Gallery of Art's East Building auditorium.

13 -- "Killer of Sheep," Charles Burnett's restored 1977 indie masterpiece, was one of the first films to be selected for the Library of Congress's National Film Registry. Often referred to as one of the greatest African American-directed films, it's about a young man (Henry Gayle Sanders) whose emotional well-being is adversely affected by his job in a sheep slaughterhouse.

18-- "Fay Grim," an espionage satire from wry stylist Hal Hartley, stars Parker Posey as an estranged wife trying to track her novelist-husband (Thomas Jay Ryan) who's been missing for seven years, and whose terrorist-oriented novel has become interesting to a CIA agent (Jeff Goldblum).

18 -- "Shrek the Third" finds Shrek (the voice of Mike Myers) and his posse in Far, Far Away when King Harold (John Cleese) falls ill. Justin Timberlake voices a new character, Artie.

25 -- "Paprika," a sci-fi animated feature from renowned Japanese animator Satoshi Kon, is about the panic that ensues when a machine that infiltrates people's dreams is stolen.

25 -- "Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End," third in the franchise, brings back Johnny Depp (as swaggery pirate Jack Sparrow), Orlando Bloom, Keira Knightley, Geoffrey Rush and the wonderful Bill Nighy. Look for Rolling Stone Keith Richards -- the inspiration for Depp's character -- who plays Sparrow's dad.

25 -- "Red Road," Andrea Arnold's arty thriller about a female surveillance camera operator in Scotland who confronts a sexual predator she has been observing on her monitors.

JUNE

TBD -- "Eagle vs. Shark" is a deadpan indie comedy from New Zealander Taika Waititi, about the romance between two oddballs -- Lily (Loren Horsley), a fast-food clerk, and Jarrod (Jemaine Clement), an electronics store assistant.

TBD -- New Films From Korea, a series of works from contemporary Korean filmmakers -- whose work has become an increasingly regular presence at international festivals -- will be shown at AFI Silver.

TBD -- "The Trials of Darryl Hunt," a documentary by Ricki Stern and Anne Sundberg, examines the travesties of justice that led to the wrongful, almost 20-year imprisonment of Hunt, convicted of raping a white woman in Winston-Salem, N.C.

1 -- "Gracie," a 1970s-set drama about a 16-year-old female soccer player (Carly Schroeder) who proves ballgames aren't just for boys.

1 -- " Hot Rod" stars Andy Samberg ("Saturday Night Live") as a motorbike stunt rider who plans a daredevil stunt to raise money for his abusive stepfather's heart operation.

1 -- "Knocked Up," a romantic comedy from writer-director Judd Apatow ("The 40-Year-Old Virgin"), follows a one-night stand that leads to an unwanted pregnancy for an entertainment reporter (Katherine Heigl) and an underachieving dude (Seth Rogen).

4 -- "Love in Asia and Europe," a series of shorts revolving around romantic love, will be shown over the course of nine evenings at Washington's Goethe-Institut. Each evening will include films from two countries -- one Asian, one European -- followed by a discussion. Through June 15.

8 -- "Hostel: Part II" is the answer to the question: When can we see more travelers getting tortured and slaughtered in Slovakia -- just like Eli Roth's 2005 "Hostel"? The victims this time are American women, played by Lauren German, Bijou Phillips and Heather Matarazzo.

8 -- "Ocean's 13" reunites neo-Rat Packers George Clooney, Brad Pitt, Matt Damon, Don Cheadle and others for the third -- and supposedly final -- adventure, and also stars Al Pacino and Ellen Barkin.

8 -- "La Vie en Rose" is a French biopic about the famous 1930s singer Edith Piaf (Marion Cotillard), who co-wrote the title song (which translates to "life through rose-colored glasses") and became one of France's most enduring entertainers.

8 -- "Surf's Up" continues the penguin-centric trend of family movies with this animated comedy about teenage rockhopper penguin Cody Maverick (Shia LaBeouf), who tries his flippers at professional surfing. Also features the voices of Jeff Bridges, Jon Heder and James Woods.

12 -- Silverdocs, the American Film Institute's annual celebration of innovative documentaries from around the world, will be held at the Silver Theatre, with screenings, panel discussions and post-movie sessions with many of the filmmakers. Through June 17.

15 -- "Evening," inspired by Susan Minot's novel, stars Vanessa Redgrave as a dying woman taking stock of her life and her family. Natasha Richardson, Toni Collette and Claire Danes also star.

15 -- "Fantastic Four: Rise of the Silver Surfer" marks another tough day at the office for superheroes Reed "Mr. Fantastic" Richards (Ioan Gruffudd), Susan "Invisible Woman" Storm (Jessica Alba), Johnny "The Human Torch" Storm (Chris Evans) and Ben "The Thing" Grimm (Michael Chiklis) as the Silver Surfer (Doug Jones) gets busy with his globally destructive agenda.

15 -- "Fido" is a zombie satire set in the "Father Knows Best" era, as the good townspeople of Willard live in seeming harmony with their domesticated undead servants. But revolution is in the air.

15 -- "Nancy Drew" features America's oldest teenage girl detective in this adventure centered on the mysterious death of a Hollywood star. Emma Roberts ("Aquamarine") plays Nancy, and Tate Donovan's her widowed father.

22 -- "A Mighty Heart" revisits the traumatic experience of Mariane Pearl (Angelina Jolie) when her husband, Wall Street Journal reporter Danny Pearl (Dan Futterman), was abducted and murdered by terrorists in Pakistan. It's directed by Michael Winterbottom.

22 -- "Evan Almighty," a sequel to "Bruce Almighty," switches God's appointee from Jim Carrey to Steve Carell, who plays a congressman instructed by the Supreme One (Morgan Freeman) to build an ark loaded with the world's animals.

22 -- "Slow Burn" stars Ray Liotta as a district attorney whose attempts to understand a homicide case are complicated by conflicting assertions from his assistant (Jolene Blalock) and an elusive stranger (LL Cool J).

24 -- Modernity and Tradition, a 10-week series on films from Central Europe made between the wars, will be screened at the National Gallery of Art's East Building auditorium. Through Aug. 24.

29 -- "Live Free or Die Hard" calls Bruce Willis back to action as Beretta-toting cop John McClane -- his mission this time, to stop an Internet-savvy terrorist organization from shutting down the government's computer capabilities.

29 -- "Ratatouille," a computer-generated feature from Pixar Animation, features a rat named Remy (voiced by Patton Oswalt) who shocks his rodent family by insisting on scavenging exclusively from the kitchen of a fine Parisian restaurant. Brad Bird ("The Iron Giant") directs.

JUNE

TBD -- "Eagle vs. Shark" is a deadpan indie comedy from New Zealander Taika Waititi, about the romance between two oddballs -- Lily (Loren Horsley), a fast-food clerk, and Jarrod (Jemaine Clement), an electronics store assistant.

TBD -- New Films From Korea, a series of works from contemporary Korean filmmakers -- whose work has become an increasingly regular presence at international festivals -- will be shown at AFI Silver.

TBD -- "The Trials of Darryl Hunt," a documentary by Ricki Stern and Anne Sundberg, examines the travesties of justice that led to the wrongful, almost 20-year imprisonment of Hunt, convicted of raping a white woman in Winston-Salem, N.C.

1 -- "Gracie," a 1970s-set drama about a 16-year-old female soccer player (Carly Schroeder) who proves ballgames aren't just for boys.

1 -- " Hot Rod" stars Andy Samberg ("Saturday Night Live") as a motorbike stunt rider who plans a daredevil stunt to raise money for his abusive stepfather's heart operation.

1 -- "Knocked Up," a romantic comedy from writer-director Judd Apatow ("The 40-Year-Old Virgin"), follows a one-night stand that leads to an unwanted pregnancy for an entertainment reporter (Katherine Heigl) and an underachieving dude (Seth Rogen).

4 -- "Love in Asia and Europe," a series of shorts revolving around romantic love, will be shown over the course of nine evenings at Washington's Goethe-Institut. Each evening will include films from two countries -- one Asian, one European -- followed by a discussion. Through June 15.

8 -- "Hostel: Part II" is the answer to the question: When can we see more travelers getting tortured and slaughtered in Slovakia -- just like Eli Roth's 2005 "Hostel"? The victims this time are American women, played by Lauren German, Bijou Phillips and Heather Matarazzo.

8 -- "Ocean's 13" reunites neo-Rat Packers George Clooney, Brad Pitt, Matt Damon, Don Cheadle and others for the third -- and supposedly final -- adventure, and also stars Al Pacino and Ellen Barkin.

8 -- "La Vie en Rose" is a French biopic about the famous 1930s singer Edith Piaf (Marion Cotillard), who co-wrote the title song (which translates to "life through rose-colored glasses") and became one of France's most enduring entertainers.

8 -- "Surf's Up" continues the penguin-centric trend of family movies with this animated comedy about teenage rockhopper penguin Cody Maverick (Shia LaBeouf), who tries his flippers at professional surfing. Also features the voices of Jeff Bridges, Jon Heder and James Woods.

12 -- Silverdocs, the American Film Institute's annual celebration of innovative documentaries from around the world, will be held at the Silver Theatre, with screenings, panel discussions and post-movie sessions with many of the filmmakers. Through June 17.

15 -- "Evening," inspired by Susan Minot's novel, stars Vanessa Redgrave as a dying woman taking stock of her life and her family. Natasha Richardson, Toni Collette and Claire Danes also star.

15 -- "Fantastic Four: Rise of the Silver Surfer" marks another tough day at the office for superheroes Reed "Mr. Fantastic" Richards (Ioan Gruffudd), Susan "Invisible Woman" Storm (Jessica Alba), Johnny "The Human Torch" Storm (Chris Evans) and Ben "The Thing" Grimm (Michael Chiklis) as the Silver Surfer (Doug Jones) gets busy with his globally destructive agenda.

15 -- "Fido" is a zombie satire set in the "Father Knows Best" era, as the good townspeople of Willard live in seeming harmony with their domesticated undead servants. But revolution is in the air.

15 -- "Nancy Drew" features America's oldest teenage girl detective in this adventure centered on the mysterious death of a Hollywood star. Emma Roberts ("Aquamarine") plays Nancy, and Tate Donovan's her widowed father.

22 -- "A Mighty Heart" revisits the traumatic experience of Mariane Pearl (Angelina Jolie) when her husband, Wall Street Journal reporter Danny Pearl (Dan Futterman), was abducted and murdered by terrorists in Pakistan. It's directed by Michael Winterbottom.

22 -- "Evan Almighty," a sequel to "Bruce Almighty," switches God's appointee from Jim Carrey to Steve Carell, who plays a congressman instructed by the Supreme One (Morgan Freeman) to build an ark loaded with the world's animals.

22 -- "Slow Burn" stars Ray Liotta as a district attorney whose attempts to understand a homicide case are complicated by conflicting assertions from his assistant (Jolene Blalock) and an elusive stranger (LL Cool J).

24 -- Modernity and Tradition, a 10-week series on films from Central Europe made between the wars, will be screened at the National Gallery of Art's East Building auditorium. Through Aug. 24.

29 -- "Live Free or Die Hard" calls Bruce Willis back to action as Beretta-toting cop John McClane -- his mission this time, to stop an Internet-savvy terrorist organization from shutting down the government's computer capabilities.

29 -- "Ratatouille," a computer-generated feature from Pixar Animation, features a rat named Remy (voiced by Patton Oswalt) who shocks his rodent family by insisting on scavenging exclusively from the kitchen of a fine Parisian restaurant. Brad Bird ("The Iron Giant") directs.


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