The Benmore Botanic Garden, near Dunoon, is on the southern fringe of Argyll & Bute, a region of Scotland known for the beauty of its mountains, tidal and freshwater lochs and coastal terrain.
The Benmore Botanic Garden, near Dunoon, is on the southern fringe of Argyll & Bute, a region of Scotland known for the beauty of its mountains, tidal and freshwater lochs and coastal terrain.
© Benmore Botanic Garden

Even in Winter, A Scottish Garden Beckons

The Benmore Botanic Garden hosts rare and old rhododendrons as well as endangered plants from Bhutan and Chile.
The Benmore Botanic Garden hosts rare and old rhododendrons as well as endangered plants from Bhutan and Chile. (Adrian Higgins - The Washington Post)

Network News

X Profile
View More Activity
By Adrian Higgins
Washington Post Staff Writer
Sunday, February 18, 2007

My niece is a horticulturist who has worked at some pretty amazing places, and her work has opened doors for her to visit other special gardens.

I have learned to trust her judgment when it comes to finding new gardens for me to visit in England and Wales.

So when Johanna said she had been to a garden unlike any other, I had to find a way to get there, too. There were a couple of snags: The place in question, Benmore Botanic Garden, was off the beaten track, at the edge of Loch Eck in Argyll in the west of Scotland. And the only time I could get there was in December, when the rainfall for the month averages 12 inches. On the days when the sun shines, it does so for about 5 1/2 hours.

This better be worth it, I thought, as I drove the twisting and misty B road across the glens of Argyll's Cowal Peninsula.

I won't keep you in suspense: Benmore, essentially an arboretum, is one of the most powerful gardens I have seen, and even in the dead of winter it is a place of vital mystery and enchantment.

The thing is, there is no dead of winter in coastal Argyll. Flowers are sparse, but the landscape is alive with the colors of a temperate rain forest: the pink-red of sphagnum moss, the maroons of fallen bracken, the golden yellow mountains capped with snow, and a million shades of green. The only tempering effect on Benmore's delicious verdancy is that the wider geography has already set the tone. Through 150 years of ambitious but careful garden-making, Benmore is the essential Argyll, gathered and intense.

The primal flora -- mosses, lichens, liverworts and ferns -- come alive in the winter and form great swaths of greenery on the woodland floors. The majestic conifers are awe-inspiring. Scots pines, western cedars and Douglas firs reach well over 100 feet, and the entrance to Benmore is marked by an avenue of 49 giant redwoods that are now so tall they appear to look down on the winter sun. It is a testament to the vitality of Benmore that only one redwood has died since the avenue was planted in 1863. Its creator was a brief owner of the estate, a wealthy American named Piers Patrick who clearly wanted the redwoods to remind him of home. Lindens, elms or Scots pines might have been a more obvious choice for a Scottish laird, but today we are glad Patrick chose these gentle giants. They are now more than 165 feet tall.

* * *

The avenue is the first element you see after entering the garden and taking the iron bridge over the River Eachaig, raging from particularly heavy rains before I arrived. The avenue is carpeted with moss and bathed in the low, golden light of solstice time. By early afternoon, the trees are steaming where the sunbeams play on the flares of their trunks. This only enhances the idea that Benmore is some sort of fantastic paradise. The same North Atlantic Drift that warms the tree ferns and palms of Heligan, 350 miles to the south, is at work here, transforming a glacial northland into a place of temperate lushness. The air can be cold after an hour or two, and the frost is slow to leave the great lawns of the old walled kitchen garden at the base of Benmore. But the light, fleeting and precious, plays with the trees and makes their far-reaching shadows move in a sort of dance.

I went to the charming, converted stable block that is Benmore's offices, where I met Peter Baxter, the curator, who had agreed to give me a tour. Technically, the garden is closed in the winter, reopening March 1, but all that means is that the ticket office and cafe are closed. If you want to risk the weather in the off-season, you are free to visit, though there may be days when Baxter closes the garden or parts of it for safety or maintenance reasons. Best to phone ahead.

He asked me if I had time to take the grand tour of the 120-acre garden. I had come from Washington and hadn't been in Scotland for 29 years; I had all the time in the world.

If you should arrive in the drizzle, don't rue it. This place exists as a rain forest in one of the wettest corners of Europe. Gardeners in eastern Scotland lament the lack of moisture; on the west coast it is the lifeblood. The wettest of the four major gardens controlled by the Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh, Benmore receives more than 100 inches of rain a year. Couple this with the richly organic and acidic soil, and you find a perfect environment for huge conifers, tiny mosses and lots in between, not least the rare and old rhododendrons that have played such an important role in Benmore's history.


CONTINUED     1        >

© 2007 The Washington Post Company


Network News

X My Profile
View More Activity