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Thursday, February 22, 2007

Anne Thurber Loud ShultzVolunteer

Anne Thurber Loud Shultz, 83, a longtime volunteer at the National Zoo and a board member of the Washington YWCA, died Feb. 13 after a heart attack at the Covington retirement home in Aliso Viejo, Calif., where she lived. She also had cancer.

Mrs. Shultz lived in Washington most of her life, volunteering at the zoo for 40 years. She was a past board member of the zoo, as well as the YWCA, and she volunteered as a mentor for senior girls at Woodrow Wilson High School. She also enjoyed the Washington Opera.

She was born in Boston and studied at Pomona College in California, before joining the WAVES during World War II and serving as a hospital corpsman. After the war, she graduated from Smith College in Northampton, Mass. She married in 1949 and settled in Washington, where her husband, Dr. Carl Swan Shultz, was an assistant surgeon general in the Public Health Service. He died in 1977.

Mrs. Shultz moved to California four years ago.

Survivors include two children, Anne Marina Shultz of Pacifica, Calif., and John Peter Shultz of Seattle; and her sister, Jane Hummer of Laguna Nigel, Calif.

Johanna Franchetti MardirosianMuseum Planner

Johanna Franchetti Mardirosian, 68, who worked with her husband in their architectural firm, died of complications of multiple sclerosis Feb. 10 at her home in McLean.

Mrs. Mardirosian did research and planning for client museums of the Potomac Group architectural firm. She worked on interactive projects for the Museum of Westward Expansion in St. Louis, the National Visitor Bicentennial project at Union Station, the Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum in Tucson and the Virginia Living Museum in Newport News.

She was born in Munich less than a month after Kristallnacht, the daughter of an American mother and an Italian Jewish father, the composer Arnoldo Franchetti. The family lived in hiding in Sweden and in northern Italy during World War II. After moving to the United States in 1948, she played concert piano and attended Smith College and the University of Connecticut. She spoke five languages: Swedish, Italian, German, English and Ladin, a Romance language spoken in the Dolomite mountains in Italy.

She married in 1960 and moved to the Washington area in 1967.

Mrs. Mardirosian, who was semi-retired, enjoyed reading, concertgoing and writing letters. She wrote a memoir based on her war experiences, her mother's journals and her early years in the United States.

Survivors include her husband of 46 years, Aram Mardirosian of McLean; three children, Amanda McCarthy of Pacific Palisades, Calif., John Mardirosian of Greystones, Ireland and Katharine Mardirosian of McLean; and seven grandchildren.

Adria K. LawChurch Member

Adria Kellogg Law, 94, an active member of Fairfax Presbyterian Church and until this fall an avid bridge player, golfer and bowler, died of congestive heart failure Feb. 16 at Inova Fairfax Hospital.

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