Petraeus Says Boost in Troops May Be Needed Past Summer

Army Gen. David H. Petraeus, who took command a month ago, said 2,200 military police will be arriving in Baghdad in a few months to support the 21,500 additional troops being sent to Iraq.
Army Gen. David H. Petraeus, who took command a month ago, said 2,200 military police will be arriving in Baghdad in a few months to support the 21,500 additional troops being sent to Iraq. (Pool Photo By Chris Hondros Via Associated Press)

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By Ernesto Londoño and Thomas E. Ricks
Washington Post Staff Writers
Friday, March 9, 2007

BAGHDAD, March 8 -- Gen. David H. Petraeus, the top U.S. commander in Iraq, said Thursday that he would examine "some months" from now whether to seek an extension of the administration's troop increase and that he had no plans "right now" to request additional forces.

"If you're going to achieve the kinds of effects that we probably need," Petraeus said during his first news conference since taking command a month ago, the increased troop level "would need to be sustained certainly for some time well beyond the summer."

That comment represented a shift from his predecessor's assessment of when results would be visible. Gen. George W. Casey Jr. said in January that "it's probably going to be the summer, late summer, before we get to the point where the people in Baghdad feel safe in their neighborhoods."

Petraeus requested the additional troops to implement a counterinsurgency strategy that calls for deploying forces in small bases and outposts among civilians in order to protect them from militants.

By raising the possibility of extending the increase, Petraeus is addressing a key concern of U.S. military officials: that Iraqi insurgents and militias will simply wait out the Baghdad security plan being implemented by U.S. and Iraqi forces.

In recent weeks, there have been indications that militias, especially anti-American Shiite cleric Moqtada al-Sadr's Mahdi Army, are lying low while the U.S. military boosts its troop levels in Baghdad. One perceived advantage that militias and insurgents have over the U.S. military is that they are operating on a longer time span, and have more patience, than the Americans.

Yet if Petraeus does recommend later this year keeping troop numbers at a higher level into the winter and perhaps beyond, and the Bush administration accepts that proposal, providing the extra forces would place new strains on the Army and Marine Corps. Troops would have to be sent back to Iraq sooner than planned, perhaps with their training curtailed.

Petraeus also said 2,200 new military police will be arriving in Baghdad in a few months to support the 21,500 additional troops being deployed to secure Baghdad and other volatile areas of Iraq.

Deputy Defense Secretary Gordon England told U.S. lawmakers this week that as many as 7,000 additional support troops would be sent to Iraq to back up the extra combat personnel being deployed.

Petraeus said two of the five U.S. Army combat brigades being deployed to Baghdad had entered the capital, along with increased numbers of Iraqi troops. He said all the new U.S. troops, including about 4,000 Marines, would be in place in June.

He did not confirm a report in Thursday's New York Times saying that his second in command, Lt. Gen. Raymond T. Odierno, has recommended that the additional U.S. troops stay in Iraq through February 2008.

"I have certainly not reached a conclusion yet about that," Petraeus said.


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