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Climate Change a Security Issue, McCain Says

In a speech to the Center for Strategic and International Studies, Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) said that global warming and America's dependence on foreign oil are national security issues.
In a speech to the Center for Strategic and International Studies, Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) said that global warming and America's dependence on foreign oil are national security issues. (By J. Scott Applewhite -- Associated Press)

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Tuesday, April 24, 2007

Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) cast global warming and America's dependence on foreign oil as national security issues in a speech on energy policy yesterday, the last of three addresses designed to outline the foundation of his soon-to-be announced presidential campaign.

"National security depends on energy security," said McCain in the speech, which was part of the Center for Strategic and International Studies' "Decision 2008" program. "The problem isn't a Hollywood invention, nor is doing something about it a vanity of Cassandra-like hysterics."

McCain was light on specifics, but he made clear that energy independence and climate change are important to him, while leaving exact policy proposals for later in the campaign.

The address came two days before McCain will enter the presidential race with a series of stops beginning in New Hampshire and ending in his home state of Arizona. McCain had previously given high-profile speeches on Iraq and the economy in preparation for his official entrance into the 2008 field.

-- Chris Cillizza

Obama Declares Foreign Policy Plans

Sen. Barack Obama (D-Ill.) laid out his prescription for U.S. foreign policy, declaring that "the security of the American people is inextricably linked to the security of all people."

Obama began his talk at the Chicago Council on Global Affairs ominously, saying: "These are not the best of times for America's reputation in the world." But he said the nation can reclaim its historic place in leading the world, and he outlined five principles to do so.

Obama said that the Iraq war must end and that the United States must renew focus on other issues in the region, such as Israeli-Palestinian relations. He also called for a rebuilding of the nation's armed forces, adding 65,000 soldiers to the Army and 27,000 to the Marines.

He also urged a global counterproliferation effort to secure and destroy weapons of mass destruction, pledging that if he is elected, by the end of his term all nuclear weapons and material at vulnerable sites would be secured.

Obama called on the United States to reinvigorate its commitment to international alliances and organizations and said the country must fight the "root causes" of terrorism and violence around the world, such as poverty.


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