China: US Must Be Positive on Climate

Greenpeace protesters led by an activist dressed as a polar bear, protest to call on the Philippine Senate to pass a renewable energy bill, before the legislative body goes on a recess for a long holiday Wednesday Dec. 19, 2007, outside the Philippine Senate in Manila. The environmentalist group is campaigning to stop reliance on fossil fuels and is advocating for renewable energy which they claim is the key to stopping climate change. (AP Photo/Bullit Marquez)
Greenpeace protesters led by an activist dressed as a polar bear, protest to call on the Philippine Senate to pass a renewable energy bill, before the legislative body goes on a recess for a long holiday Wednesday Dec. 19, 2007, outside the Philippine Senate in Manila. The environmentalist group is campaigning to stop reliance on fossil fuels and is advocating for renewable energy which they claim is the key to stopping climate change. (AP Photo/Bullit Marquez) (Bullit Marquez - AP)
The Associated Press
Thursday, December 20, 2007; 3:04 AM

BEIJING -- The United States should take a more positive role in tackling climate change while developing nations improve their own domestic energy efficiency, China's chief climate change negotiator said Thursday.

China is satisfied with the result of the recent Bali climate change negotiations and will cooperate in international talks while working to improve its energy efficiency, Yu Qingtai, China's special representative for climate change negotiations, told a news briefing.

"When it comes to climate change, developing countries have a basic common position," Yu said, adding that the countries would have "different responsibilities" in handling the issue.

A contentious U.N. climate conference on the Indonesian resort island of Bali ended with the United States, facing angry criticism from other delegations, relenting in its opposition to a request from developing nations for more technological help fighting climate change.

Yu welcomed the move by the U.S., saying the country "should play a more positive and constructive role in dealing with climate change, and should make its own contributions against the common challenge."

The Bali roadmap is intended to lead to a more inclusive, effective successor to the 1997 Kyoto Protocol, which commits 37 industrialized nations to cut greenhouse gases by an average of 5 percent between 2008 and 2012.

"The agreement is indeed hard-earned," Yu said. "The roadmap is only a beginning, which has shown the direction and planning for the coming two years. (But) a large amount of substantive work will depend on these two years of tough negotiations."

Developing countries such as China and India agree that developed countries possess the technology that can help developing countries reduce emissions, Yu said.

China, which some believe has surpassed the U.S. as the world's top emitter of carbon dioxide and other heat-trapping gases, has questioned the fairness of binding cuts when its per capita emissions are about 33 percent of developed countries.


© 2007 The Associated Press