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Last Wishes Still Unfulfilled

Lawyer Wayne Eig with the Bethesda firm Paley Rothman, surrounded by documents in the Green estate case. He represents Nassif.
Lawyer Wayne Eig with the Bethesda firm Paley Rothman, surrounded by documents in the Green estate case. He represents Nassif. (By Katherine Frey -- The Washington Post)

Green's first wife, Catherine Roe, died in 1959. Nassif said she and Green began dating two years later. Green proposed during a round-the-world trip, and they were married Aug. 24, 1963, in Egypt.

In time, Nassif developed her own career: She served on a bank board and invested in real estate. At the time she was married, she lived in the Woodner, an apartment complex on 16th Street NW in the District.

After the wedding, Nassif continued living in the apartment, and Green lived in College Park with his children. She later moved to Silver Spring and then to the condominium in Rockville.

Nassif and Green never lived together, an arrangement that she says was unconventional but one that both were comfortable with. "That may have been a secret to the longevity of our marriage," she said.

With her own investments, Social Security benefits and a few disbursements that have been made to her from the estate, Nassif lives comfortably. With her portion of the estate, she said, she hopes to make a donation to a medical center. Green had heart problems throughout much of his life, and Nassif said she hopes to have a cardiac ward named for him.

Carlton Green began working for his father as a teenager, cleaning septic tanks at an Eastern Shore hotel his father owned. He earned enough money mowing lawns to pay for his education at the University of Maryland and law school, he said, and he became one of his father's closest advisers.

Carlton Green's son, Walter L. Green, is also a lawyer. He is representing his father in the estate matter.

Asked what his father would say about the court fight, Carlton Green said: "He's not around to say anything. Unfortunately, the problems are visited on the son."

Asked what her husband would say, Nassif replied: "He would be appalled. He was never confrontational or controversial. He'd always compromise."


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