ARLINGTON NATIONAL CEMETERY

Soldiers Who Died Together Share Final Resting Place

Maj. Gen. Alan W. Thrasher, kneeling, presents an American flag to Chris Ann Brown, mother of Staff Sgt. Harrison Brown. Brown was buried yesterday at Arlington National Cemetery with two soldiers he died with in Iraq.
Maj. Gen. Alan W. Thrasher, kneeling, presents an American flag to Chris Ann Brown, mother of Staff Sgt. Harrison Brown. Brown was buried yesterday at Arlington National Cemetery with two soldiers he died with in Iraq. (By Lois Raimondo -- The Washington Post)

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By Christy Goodman
Washington Post Staff Writer
Friday, September 14, 2007

One soldier was on his way home to his baby girl and two others had just arrived in Iraq when they were killed in Baghdad on Easter Sunday. The remains of the three men were buried together yesterday at Arlington National Cemetery.

A single silver, flag-draped coffin was set before the men's families. One pink-flowered crape myrtle tree marks the site, growing next to where the headstone bearing the three names will be placed.

Army Staff Sgt. Harrison Brown, Pfc. David N. Simmons and Sgt. Todd A. Singleton were killed April 8 when enemy forces attacked their units with a makeshift bomb and small-arms fire, the Defense Department reported. The three soldiers were in the same armored vehicle, family members said.

At yesterday's service, a seven-man squad fired three volleys, and a bugler played in the distance. A few dozen mourners looked on as Maj. Gen. Alan W. Thrasher presented flags to three mothers, two fathers and one widow.

The men are the most recent of 366 military personnel killed in Iraq to be buried at Arlington.

Brown and Simmons were members of the 2nd Battalion, 69th Armor Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, based at Fort Benning, Ga., and had been in Iraq for about a week. Brown, 31, was on his fourth tour; Simmons, 20, was on his first. Singleton, 24, was assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 5th Calvary Regiment, 1st Brigade, 1st Calvary Division, based at Fort Hood, Tex.

"He was actually training them. . . . He was supposed to be coming home" to Muskegon County, Mich., said Shelly Carnes, Singleton's sister-in-law. Singleton's daughter, Emma, was a newborn when he left for his second tour. Now she is 11 months old, and "she looks just like him," Carnes said.

Singleton was outspoken, a leader, a prankster and "a real good friend," Carnes said. "He would have been a really good dad. That is what makes me sad. He never got the opportunity to be a dad."

Once, before Singleton's daughter was born, Carnes caught him "rocking nothing in a rocking chair." When she asked him what he was doing, he answered, 'I'm practicing for my baby,' " Carnes said.

Singleton graduated from Reeths-Puffer High School in Muskegon in 2001 and enlisted in the Army. On Sept. 24, 2001, shortly after he graduated from basic training, he married Stephanie, his high school sweetheart.

"I still see his face the last time he walked out the door," Carnes said. "I said: 'Don't worry. I'll take care of your girls.' He said, 'I know you'll take care of my girls.' "

Simmons, who went by his middle name, Neil, called his mother in Kokomo, Ind., the Saturday before Easter to say he would be hard to reach while on patrol. "The very next morning he was killed," said his mother, Teri Tenbrook. She said the armored vehicle that the three men were in was "entirely destroyed."


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