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A Campfire Good Enough to Eat

Pretzels and coconut are used for firewood, and candy corn for flames, in this edible campfire.
Pretzels and coconut are used for firewood, and candy corn for flames, in this edible campfire. (By Julia Ewan -- The Washington Post)

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Friday, October 5, 2007

You can teach kids the art of creating an efficient campfire by doing something yummy: building an edible one.

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Materials:

M&Ms or Skittles (optional)

Pretzel sticks, thin and thick

Shredded coconut

Toothpick

Small red candies

Candy corn

Peanut butter (optional)

Cup of water

Instructions:

Use a paper plate or napkin to represent the clearing where the fire will be built. You can use M&Ms or Skittles to create the stone ring in which fires are sometimes built.

Make an "A" out of thick pretzel sticks. Put coconut in a small pile against the horizontal bar of the "A" to represent the tinder. Have children hold a toothpick under the tinder to simulate using a match.

Next, put small red candies on the coconut to represent the first flames. Gradually add thin pretzel sticks to represent kindling; build a tepee or crisscross pattern, leaving space between sticks so air can flow freely. Finally, top with thick pretzel sticks to represent larger pieces of wood and add candy corn to symbolize flames. (If your fire tends to crumble, you can use a little peanut butter to "glue" the parts together.) A cup of water beside the creation represents the fire bucket, a safety item you should always have. (And remember, adults should always supervise children when starting a fire.)

Now, eat!


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