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Date Lab
She Wants to Take Over the World. Him, Not So Much.

Sunday, October 14, 2007

7:30 p.m., David Craig, Bethesda

Leana: It was raining when I got to the restaurant, so I went to the bathroom and cleaned up. I came out and heard this guy ask about Date Lab. [It was Geoff.] I knew immediately that he wasn't my type. I'm the type of person, people notice me. I have a presence. Geoff didn't have that presence. He was a little nerdy-looking.

Geoff: Leana was pretty cute. She's in very good shape, had a big, warm smile and was wearing a great red dress. She looked like she'd made an effort, which I appreciated.

Leana: I followed the host to the table and told myself I wanted to look for other things that I'd like. Things can override the physical.

Geoff: We had a lot to talk about. We were both born in Asia. She also works for a group that does health care research. She's very young, but she's completed med school. You need to be a smart cookie to do that.

Leana: He was a bit nervous. A simple question led to long answers. I didn't want to hear about what he likes to eat or how the food system works at Harvard. I wanted more about how he thinks, his views on the world.

Geoff: I know I'm a big talker, but I thought we had good conversational rhythm. It was very comfortable. If there are things she wanted to know, she could have asked.

Leana: I was looking for his passion. He said it was food. He said his primary woman-getting skill was cooking. At one point, he had a bite of a grilled peach and looked like he was in heaven. That's great, but I wish that passion carried over to other things -- kickball, women, his job, whatever. I told my friend later that the food is the closest thing that either one of us would come to an orgasm in each other's presence.

Geoff: I'm really into sports -- I'm obsessed with baseball; I play on a soccer team. But it's not a topic I'm itching to bring up. If there isn't a lot of shared interest, it can kill a conversation. I like to talk about the other person, what makes them tick.

Leana: After a while, it became apparent that he didn't have the other quality I'm looking for -- ambition. I wanted to hear, "I want to run for president" or, "I want to learn 10 different languages." But [he said] his ambition is to balance home and work life. That wasn't the grand-scale attitude I like.

Geoff: Work-life balance -- and, someday, work-family balance -- is a very high priority for me. I made career choices with the idea of having that balance. [But] I'm mildly surprised that she didn't think I was driven. I've always thought of myself that way: I worked very hard throughout school; I put in a lot of effort at the office.

Leana: I'm training for a ballroom dance competition and had practice at 10. So, after dessert, Geoff walked me to the dance studio, about a block away. He asked for my e-mail, gave me a hug. I'd give the date a 1.5 [out of 5]. There was no romantic hope. I have lots of friends who want to meet this settled, homebody type, but that's not for me.

Geoff: I'd give the date a 3 [out of 5]. I had a good time; she's warm, smart and has done some interesting things. But I'm not sure there was something beyond that.

Interviews by Kelly DiNardo

UPDATE: Geoff e-mailed Leana to say thanks for the date. She invited him to a dance social. He plans to invite her to a party.

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