Date Lab
She hates dating. Can a smart, good-looking charmer break through her defenses?

Sunday, October 21, 2007

7:30 P.M., CEIBA, DOWNTOWN

Adam: It was my first blind date. I didn't know whether to be nervous, apprehensive, or what. I rode my [motorcycle] to the restaurant and beat her there, so they sat me at the bar.

Alma: I was very, very nervous. I'm a real daddy's girl, so I called my dad [from outside the restaurant]. He said: "What are you doing? Stop being a baby and get in there." Adam was at the bar, so the people from the restaurant walked me over. You'd think it was my last walk, like I was going to the gas chamber.

Adam: I felt a slight tap on the shoulder and turned around. It was the manager bringing her over. She looked beautiful and just seemed very warm. At that point, the little bit of pressure went away.

Alma: I was like, Oh, he's cute. He was exactly what I described in severe detail for The Washington Post.

Adam: They sat us at a table overlooking the restaurant. One of the first questions I had was, "Why are you available?" She mentioned that she works [a whole lot] and she's selective. She said she was pleasantly surprised at Date Lab's choice. I was like, Woo-hoo!

Alma: Both of us said we don't like to date; it's more like work. So we had that in common. We started talking and didn't stop for almost an hour and a half. Then I was like, "I'm starving, please let me order." He was laughing.

Adam: We laughed the majority of the time. It was very relaxed, like I'd known her for a long time. I asked her if she'd had ceviche before. I'd always wanted to try it, so we did. It was delicious. She said that I seemed very cultured for a country boy.

Alma: I love that combination. And he was very knowledgeable about many different things. He said he's nerdy, and I said, "You're not nerdy, you're adorable."

Adam: We talked about our jobs briefly and our perceptions of being a single, affluent person of color in the city. That was the only part of our conversation that was a little serious.

Alma: We prayed over the food. That was really good because I go to church every Sunday and I'd want someone to go with me.

Adam: I would say [there was chemistry]. Especially as we realized that we're both very close with our families. Most of my friends are immediate family members; she said the same thing. After dessert, we looked up and the restaurant was empty.

Alma: We were like, "Oh, my God, we just closed down the restaurant." I had all these missed calls. My friends and family were like: "Where is she? He could have killed her."

Adam: We walked out front. I gave her my card and said, "I hope you decide to use it," and she said, "I think I will." She gave me a really nice hug -- not one of those church hugs where there's a foot between you -- and waved as I pulled off on my bike. I'd rate the date a solid 4.5 [out of 5]. I had a great time with a really wonderful, outgoing, ambitious woman.

Alma: [It's a] 4.5. He is such a gentleman. He opened every door for me. He would not even order food until I ordered. I could not speak any more highly of this date.

Interviews by Christina Breda Antoniades

UPDATE: A day later, Alma and Adam talked on the phone for an hour. The two planned to get together for a second date the following week.

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