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Jericho: Clive Barker's Losing Battle

Clive Barker's Jericho has gruesome monsters, but little else to recommend it.
Clive Barker's Jericho has gruesome monsters, but little else to recommend it. (Codemasters/ign.com)

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Friday, December 7, 2007

Master of the macabre Clive Barker has had a mixed track record in gaming. His first foray, Undying, was a solid, creepy PC shooter, but his second game was scrapped in the middle of development. The third time is not the charm: Jericho introduces a unique premise and classic, demented monsters, but it fails to deliver.

In the single-player shooter game, an elite Jericho squad from the U.S. Chaplains, a team of priests, witches and paranormal experts, h eads to the Middle East to stop a traitor from unleashing the Firstborn (the ultimate evil). Each member of the team has unique abilities, such as controlling a fire demon, hacking reality, performing telekinesis or using healing powers. Another power is teleportation. Early on, the lead member of the team, Capt. Devin Ross, is killed. Players assume his spirit and jump from one team member to another, using their weapons and abilities. Unfortunately, thanks to shoddy artificial intelligence, the teammates aren't always much help when you're not possessing them.

With Barker on board, you get gruesome creatures. But once you're past the cool premise, the story line is weak, and the characters are never fully developed. In addition, the levels become dull and repetitive, and the relatively short game is easy to beat. With no cooperative play or online mode, this game has zero replay value.

-- John Gaudiosi

Clive Barker's Jericho Mature; Xbox 360, PlayStation 3 ($60) Codemasters/Mercury Steam Entertainment Clive Barker's Jericho Mature; Xbox 360, PlayStation 3 ($60) Codemasters/Mercury Steam Entertainment


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