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Schools Targeted For Closure

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Darlene Babil, president of the school's PTA, expressed dismay at the school's slow demise. Over the years, it has been cutting programs. "They had a very good program. All the students who came there were there because they wanted to get a jump on the things they wanted to do in their careers," Babil said. "Why would you eliminate that?"

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Young Elementary/

Browne Middle

These schools are adjacent, and Rhee hasn't decided which one to close. At Young, enrollment dropped 29 percent between 2002 and 2006. Last year, 26 percent of the students were proficient in reading and 11 percent in math.

Browne can hold more than 800 students but has 211 this year, with a drop of 27 percent in recent years. Last year, 18 percent of the students were proficient in reading; in math, 25 percent.

Bowen Elementary

The school, built in 1931, is not as underenrolled as many of the others on the closure list, with 221 students, 60 below capacity. Still, the school's enrollment fell 21 percent between 2002 and 2006. Last year, 36 percent of students were proficient in reading and 25 percent were proficient in math.

Students would transfer to Amidon Elementary, 401 I St. SW, where a high-tech program would be established.

Gibbs Elementary

Built in 1966 to house 531 students, the school has slightly more than half that: 281. The school lost 44 percent of its enrollment between 2002 and 2006. Just 20 percent of the students are proficient in reading, 12 percent in math. Students would go to Miner Elementary, 601 15th St. NE, which is a newer building; or Browne or Young, at 850 and 820 26th St. NE, respectively. Sixth-graders would go to Eliot Middle, 1830 Constitution Ave. NE, which is in restructuring.

Hine Middle

Since being built in 1966, the Capitol Hill school has been a center of community, with its parking lot and basketball courts in full use on the weekends by residents and flea market vendors. It was meant to house 720 students. But with 268 students, Hine is using 37 percent of its capacity. Last year, 21 percent of students were proficient in reading and 18 percent in math.

Rhee's proposal calls for Hine students to transfer to Eliot, which is using 18 percent of its building. Eliot had previously leased its empty space to a charter school.

Smothers Elementary

Built in 1923 to house 332 students, Smothers's enrollment has dropped to 186. It lost about 21 percent of its enrollment between 2002 and 2006.

Last year, 32 percent of students were proficient in reading, 20 percent in math. Students would be reassigned to Aiton Elementary, 533 48th Place NE; Benning Elementary, 100 41st St. NE; or J.C. Nalle Elementary, 219 50th St. SE.

Ronald H. Brown Middle

The school was built in 1967 to house 1,085 students. Now, with only 263 students, the school is at 24 percent capacity. The school lost nearly half its enrollment in recent years. Last year, 20 percent of students were proficient in reading and 12 percent in math, and because of years of poor test scores, the school is eligible to be restructured.

Brown students would be reassigned to Merritt, 5002 Hayes St. NE, which also lost nearly half of its enrollment in recent years. Brown would house students from H.D. Woodson Senior High during construction of its new facility.

Douglass Transition Academy and

Choice Academy

Both programs enroll students citywide. Douglass, built in 1952, is a special education program, and its students would move into classrooms across the city. Choice is an alternative suspension program at Douglass and Taft. Officials plan to combine the two locations at the Hamilton Center.

Officials say Douglass could be better used to temporarily house students from schools that are under construction or leased out to other groups.

Green Elementary (closing date not determined)

Built in 1965 to house 458 students, Green enrolls 238 students. It lost 35 percent of its enrollment between 2002 and 2006. Last year, 25 percent of students were proficient in reading; in math, 19 percent. It is in restructuring.

Under the proposal, students from nearby Turner Elementary, 3264 Stanton Rd. SE, would temporarily move to Green in the fall while the Turner building is modernized. Turner lost 25 percent of its enrollment in recent years. Once construction is complete, all students would move into the new Turner, and Green would close.

Patricia R. Harris Educational Center

Harris was built in 1976 to house 1,082 students; 532 now attend. Last year, 22 percent of students were proficient in reading, 15 percent in math.

Students in pre-K through fifth grade would be reassigned to Patterson Elementary, 4399 South Capitol Terr. SW; Hendley Elementary, 425 Chesapeake St. SE; or Leckie Elementary, 4201 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave. SW. Sixth- through eighth-graders would go to Hart Middle School, 601 Mississippi Ave. SE.

Wilkinson Elementary

The school was built in 1976 and designed for 508 students. It lost 28 percent of its students between 2002 and 2006 and enrolls 365.

Last year, 32 percent of students were proficient in reading; 9 percent were in math.

Under the proposal, students would be reassigned to Moten Elementary, 1565 Morris Rd. SE, which lost 32 percent of its enrollment in recent years and is in restructuring.

Staff writer Robert Pierre contributed to this report.


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