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Blu-ray vs. HD DVD: Who Cares?

Blu-ray has a few nice but not mind-blowing features that give it an edge on the standard DVD for serious movie fans. But the bigger question may be: Does anyone care?
Blu-ray has a few nice but not mind-blowing features that give it an edge on the standard DVD for serious movie fans. But the bigger question may be: Does anyone care? (By Paul Sakuma -- Associated Press)

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By Mike Musgrove
Sunday, January 20, 2008

Dane Cook: Just as annoying in Blu-ray. The Fantastic Four: Still terrible in Blu-ray, if not worse.

The high-definition video disc format Blu-ray landed on the map for many consumers a couple of weeks back, when Warner Home Video announced it would cease supporting the rival HD DVD format. Many tech forecasters believe the move effectively ends a format war between two incompatible technologies.

This evolution in technology has some confused: If you want the full "high definition" experience, you need both the right TV set and the right sort of content. The standard DVD player doesn't put out a picture that takes advantage of the high resolution on a new, high-end TV. Blu-ray and HD DVD both offer that higher resolution picture, and both have been fighting to try to inherit the DVD legacy. Download services are quickly starting to offer high-definition content as well.

Ever since the Warner announcement (which followed other studios backing Blu-ray), I've been watching and exploring a small pile of Blu-ray discs -- and having a hard time getting too excited one way or the other about the development.

According to the info tucked in with new Blu-ray movies, the DVD- or CD-sized discs crank out a picture with a resolution that is six times greater than DVD. To put it plainly, though, I've found that I can't really tell the difference between the picture cranked out by a Blu-ray player and the picture delivered by an "upconverting" DVD player designed to make standard DVDs look their best on high-definition sets.

For the record, HD DVD supporters say this format war isn't over. Last week, HD DVD supporter Toshiba responded to Warner's announcement by cutting prices for its players to as low as $150 to draw in new customers.

But the bigger question may be: Does anyone care?

"We may see that the real winner between HD DVD and Blu-ray turns out to be iTunes," quipped analyst Michael Gartenberg to my colleague Rob Pegoraro after the keynote address last week at MacWorld. At the show, Apple's chief executive Steve Jobs announced the company will allow iTunes users to "rent" standard and high-definition movies downloaded from the online store.

Apple isn't the only company that appears to be in the business of making physical media -- the silver disc -- obsolete, of course. Microsoft supported the HD DVD format, but go on its Xbox Live service and it's just as easy to pay a few bucks to download a high-definition video file of the latest Hollywood blockbuster. Netflix, for that matter, has launched its own online streaming video service. The company notified subscribers last week that they now get unlimited access to the service's online library of 6,000 movies as part of their membership.

Blu-ray has a few nice but not mind-blowing features that give it an edge on the standard DVD for serious movie fans.

You can save "bookmarks" to easily skip to your favorite parts of a movie, for example. You also don't have to stop watching a movie to futz around with the settings or access special features; if you decide to explore the disc's extra content while watching a flick, the movie will keep playing in a smaller window on your TV screen. Nifty enough, but have I mentioned that many new movies for this format are priced around $40?

The just-released Blu-ray disc for the Western flick "3:10 to Yuma" contains an overwhelming amount of data for the curious fan. As the movie plays, viewers can read the screenplay, check out storyboard sketches used in the early stages of making the film and watch special programs about the making of the movie on a small window that pops up in the bottom corner of the screen.


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