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Literary Calendar
February 4-10, 2008

Sunday, February 3, 2008

4 MONDAY

6:30 P.M. Aaron Raz Link and his mother, Hilda Raz, discuss their collaborative memoir, What Becomes You (chronicling Link's gender reassignment from female to male), at Busboys and Poets, 2021 14th St. NW, 202-387-7638. A book signing follows.

7 P.M. Distinguished gender studies professor Carol Gilligan reads from and signs her first novel, Kyra, at Politics and Prose Bookstore, 5015 Connecticut Ave. NW, 202-364-1919.

7:30 P.M. Environmental journalist Mark Lynas discusses his new book, Six Degrees: Our Future on a Hotter Planet, as part of the "National Geographic Live!" series held at the National Geographic Society, Grosvenor Auditorium, 1600 M St. NW. Admission is $18 for nonmembers; call 202-857-7700 or visit http://www.nglive.org to RSVP.

5 TUESDAY

6:30 P.M. Jesse J. Holland, a congressional reporter for the Associated Press, presents a lecture, "The Hidden History of Washington, D.C.: The African-American Presence in the Capitol, the White House and the National Mall," drawn from his recent book Black Men Built the Capitol: Discovering African-American History In and Around Washington, D.C., at the Cleveland Park Branch Library, Connecticut Ave. & Macomb St. NW, 202-282-3080.

7 P.M. Journalists Roy Gutman, foreign editor of Newsday, and Jess Bravin discuss the newly revised and expanded edition of Crimes of War 2.0: What the Public Should Know at Borders Books-Downtown, 18th & L Sts. NW, 202-466-4999.

7 P.M. Activist and public interest lawyer Charles Halpern, founder of the Center for Law and Social Policy, discusses and signs his new memoir, Making Waves and Riding the Currents: Activism and the Practice of Wisdom, at Olsson's Books-Dupont, 1307 19th St. NW, 202-785-1133.

8 P.M. Paul Rusesabagina, the good Samaritan whose harrowing story was chronicled in the movie "Hotel Rwanda" (and who was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2005), presents a lecture, "Hotel Rwanda: A Lesson Not Learned," as part of the Johns Hopkins Foreign Affairs Symposium (celebrating its 10th year) held at Johns Hopkins University, Homewood Campus, Shriver Hall Auditorium, 3400 N. Charles St., Baltimore, Md. He will sign copies of his memoir, An Ordinary Man (written with Tom Zoellner), following the program. For further details, visit http://www.jhu.edu/fas.

6 WEDNESDAY

7 P.M. Journalist and military historian Stephen Budiansky discusses and signs The Bloody Shirt: Terror After Appomattox at Olsson's Books-Old Town, 106 S. Union St., Alexandria, Va., 703-684-0077.

7 P.M. Zane signs her new anthology of erotic fiction, Succulent: Chocolate Flava II (which includes three new stories by her) at Books-A-Million, 503 King St., Alexandria, Va., 703-548-3432. She will also read on Thursday, Feb. 7, at 7 p.m. at Borders Books-Largo, 913-A Capital Centre Blvd., Largo, Md., 301-499-2173.

7 P.M. Pulitzer Prize-winning author David Levering Lewis discusses and signs God's Crucible: Islam and the Making of Europe, 570-1215 at Politics and Prose Bookstore, 202-364-1919.

7 THURSDAY

Noon. Scholar Michael B. Oren, a senior fellow at the Shalem Center in Jerusalem, discusses and signs Power, Faith, and Fantasy: America in the Middle East: 1776 to the Present (just published in paperback) as part of the "Books & Beyond" series at the Library of Congress, James Madison Bldg., Pickford Theater, 101 Independence Ave. SE, 202-707-5221.

6:30 P.M. Financial journalist Ronald D. Orol, senior writer for the Deal and the Daily Deal (covering the activist hedge fund industry), discusses and signs his new book, Extreme Value Hedging: How Activist Hedge Fund Managers Are Taking on the World, at Reiter's Scientific and Professional Books, 1990 K St. NW, 202-223-3327.

6:45 P.M. The Library of Congress opens its Spring 2008 Literary Season with readings by award-winning poet Li-Young Lee, author of the new collection Behind My Eyes, and essayist and poet David Kirby, author of Ultra-Talk: Johnny Cash, The Mafia, Shakespeare, Drum Music, St. Teresa of Avila, and 17 Other Colossal Topics of Conversation and The Ha-Ha: Poems, in the James Madison Bldg., Montpelier Room, 202-707-5394.

7 P.M. Open Arms, the women's giving circle of the Jewish Social Service Agency (JSSA), hosts its first annual "Meet the Author" evening with novelist Elinor Lipman, author of The Inn at Lake Devine, Then She Found Me (the basis of a feature film opening in May) and, most recently, My Latest Grievance, at the Dennis and Phillip Ratner Museum, 10001 Old Georgetown Rd., Bethesda, Md. Tickets are $35; for details, call Lesley Schrier at 301-816-2667.

7 P.M. Pakistani-born British writer Nadeem Aslam, author of the novels Maps for Lost Lovers and Season of the Rainbirds, reads from his work as part of the Jenny McKean Moore Reading Series at George Washington University, Marvin Center, 3rd floor amphitheatre, 800 21st St. NW. For details, call 202-994-6180 or visit http://www.gwu.edu/english.

7:30 P.M. Graham M. Schweig, an associate professor of both religious studies and Sanskrit, discusses and signs Bhagavad Gita: The Beloved Lord's Secret Love Song at Barnes & Noble-Reston, 1851 Fountain Dr., Reston, Va., 703-437-9490.

8 FRIDAY

8 P.M."Imagination as Subversion: The Role of Imagination in Memoir & Nonfiction" is the theme of this evening's PEN/Faulkner series featuring Azar Nafisi, author of Reading Lolita in Tehran: A Memoir in Books (she is currently at work on two books, one a new memoir); Daniel Mendelsohn, author of The Lost: A Search for Six of Six Million; and Samantha Power, author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning "A Problem from Hell": America and the Age of Genocide and the forthcoming Chasing the Flame: Sergio Vieira de Mello and the Fight to Save the World, all reading from their work at the Folger Shakespeare Library, 201 East Capitol St. SE. A reception and book signing follow. Tickets are $15; call 202-544-7077 or visit http://www.folger.edu/pen.cfm to RSVP.

8 P.M. The Howard County Poetry and Literature Society (HoCoPoLitSo) will hold its 30th annual Evening of Irish Music and Poetry benefit featuring a reading by Irish poet Eavan Boland, author, most recently, of the collection Domestic Violence, preceding a medley of Irish music, song and stepdancing at the Spear Center, General Growth Properties Building, 10275 Little Patuxent Pkwy., Columbia, Md. Tickets, $30 each; call 410-772-4568 or visit http://www.hocopolitso.org.

9 SATURDAY

1 P.M. Janet Klug, past president of the American Philatelic Society, and Donald J. Sundman, president of Mystic Stamp Co., present an illustrated discussion of 100 Greatest American Stamps at the National Postal Museum, 2 Massachusetts Ave. NE, 202-633-5533. A book signing follows.

1 P.M. James McBride, author of the bestselling memoir The Color of Water: A Black Man's Tribute to His White Mother, reads from and signs his new novel, Song Yet Sung, at Politics and Prose Bookstore, 202-364-1919.

2 P.M. Professor Orville Vernon Burton discusses and signs his recent book, The Age of Lincoln, at the National Portrait Gallery, Donald Reynolds Center Bookstore, 801 G St. NW, 202-633-5450.

2 P.M. Diane Heiman discusses her new book for young girls, See What You Can Be: Explore Careers That Could Be for You! (part of the American Girls Series) at Borders Books-White Flint, 11301 Rockville Pike, Kensington, Md., 301-816-1067.

10 SUNDAY

3:30 P.M. Anne Becker, Takoma Park's poet laureate, celebrates the publication of her new chapbook, The Good Body, with a reading at Kefa Caf¿, 963 Bonifant St., Silver Spring, Md. A reception and book signing follow; call 301-589-9337 or visit http://www.space710atkefa.blogspot.com to RSVP.

6 P.M. Hiram Larew and Kim Roberts read from their work as part of the Iota Poetry Series held at the Iota Club & Caf¿, 2832 Wilson Blvd., Arlington, Va., 703-522-8340.

SPECIAL NOTICE

The Word Works is seeking submissions for the 28th annual Washington Prize, awarded for a manuscript of previously unpublished, original poetry by a living American writer. Manuscripts should be 48 to 64 pages (there are further manuscript stipulations, so be sure to visit http://www.wordworksdc.com). Manuscripts will not be returned, but send a self-addressed, stamped business envelope to be notified of the results. An entry fee of $25 applies. Entries will be accepted Jan. 15 through March 1. Send to: Steven B. Rogers, Word Works Washington Prize, 3201 Taylor St., Mt. Rainier, Md. 20712.

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