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The Wrong Job for the Man

Fresh off a Super Bowl win, Giants defensive coordinator Steve Spagnuolo might want to wait until another head coaching job pops up.
Fresh off a Super Bowl win, Giants defensive coordinator Steve Spagnuolo might want to wait until another head coaching job pops up. (By Julie Jacobson -- Associated Press)
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Do you think for a moment that Snyder and his surrogate, Executive Vice President-Football Operations Vinny Cerrato, could have found the lower-round rookies who made such critical contributions in the Super Bowl? (Ha.)

If Spagnuolo is smart, he'll stay put with the Giants and learn as much as he can from them about how good upper management operates. Another, better head coaching job will come along in time, one in which his owner doesn't impose his assistant coaches on him, or tell him whom to play at quarterback.

It's a bitter shame to say this, given how much it surely pains local fans, but the truth is that Redskins Park is no place for someone with a bright future. It's too dark and dysfunctional. The phrase "coach killer" comes to mind. No good one, except possibly Joe Gibbs, has had a decent experience under Snyder, not Norv Turner, Marty Schottenheimer, Steve Spurrier, Al Saunders or Gregg Williams. Which is why the only people who seem to be realistically entertaining the job now are either those desperate to get back in the game, such as Jim Fassel and Steve Mariucci, or climbers looking for their first head coaching office.

There is a consistent, central weakness in the Redskins' organization that no coach can fix. It's Snyder's tycoon mentality, his assumption that he can purchase people and make them do what he wants, and if they displease him, discard them. His paycheck players and presto coaching solutions fail every time. The franchise is based on a series of extravagant bribes, not a dime of which has ever been spent on the qualities that made the Giants into Super Bowl champions, namely good faith, loyalty, patience, unity and, above all, belief in the leadership at the top.

"Believe!" the Giants defenders shouted at their teammates on the sideline as Manning and the offense took the field for the game-winning drive. Everyone believed. Mara and Tisch believed in Reese, who believed in Coughlin, who believed in the players, who believed back.

Who, at this point, believes in Snyder? Run, Spagnuolo. Run, as fast as you can.


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