Correction to This Article
The article about the Senate approving a ban on industry-sponsored travel for commissioners and employees of the Consumer Product Safety Commission incorrectly said that the House did not include funding for future travel when it passed its version of the ban in December. The House appropriated $1.2 million, as did the Senate.
Tools for Safety

Senate Bans Industry-Paid Travel for CPSC

Keven Barton, a CPSC inspector, shows the XRF Thermal Niton, a tool used to screen for lead in toys and other products at the port in Long Beach, Calif., one of several ports where inspectors will be stationed permanently.
Keven Barton, a CPSC inspector, shows the XRF Thermal Niton, a tool used to screen for lead in toys and other products at the port in Long Beach, Calif., one of several ports where inspectors will be stationed permanently. (By Ric Francis -- Associated Press)
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By Annys Shin
Washington Post Staff Writer
Thursday, March 6, 2008

The Senate yesterday approved by a vote of 96 to 0 a measure banning industry-paid travel for commissioners and employees of the Consumer Product Safety Commission. The ban is part of sweeping product safety legislation that the Senate could vote on as early as today.

Sens. Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.) and Robert Menendez (D-N.J.) proposed the measure in response to a series of articles in The Washington Post reporting that the current and former heads of the CPSC, as well as staff members, accepted trips paid for by industries with business before the commission.

A similar measure was included in a larger product safety bill that the House passed in December.

Unlike the House travel ban, the Senate version provides the CPSC with $1.2 million to cover travel and lodging expenses over the next several years.

"This is about making the commission more accountable to the public," Klobuchar said in a statement. "We must prevent the CPSC from engaging in practices that give even the appearance of impropriety or undue influence from regulated industries."

Separately, the CPSC announced plans yesterday to permanently station inspectors at the nation's busiest ports, starting with the Port of Long Beach in California, acting chairman Nancy Nord said.


© 2008 The Washington Post Company

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