Ehrlich, in Fighting Mode, Appeals for Funds to Halt 'Far Left Agenda'

Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. (R) has not faded from the spotlight since leaving office as Maryland's governor in January 2007. He and his wife, Kendel, host a weekly radio show in Baltimore.
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. (R) has not faded from the spotlight since leaving office as Maryland's governor in January 2007. He and his wife, Kendel, host a weekly radio show in Baltimore. (By Susan Biddle -- The Washington Post)
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By Annapolis Notebook
Sunday, March 23, 2008

Former Maryland governor Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. (R), who left office 14 months ago, has sent out another fundraising letter in which he takes aim at "the liberal monopoly" that he left behind in Annapolis.

In letters seeking donations last year, Ehrlich refrained from criticizing Gov. Martin O'Malley (D), who defeated him in 2006, by name. Ehrlich is not similarly restrained this time.

"Today, Martin O'Malley's political monopoly controls the governor's office, the Maryland Senate, the Maryland House of Delegates, the Maryland Attorney General, the Maryland Comptroller, and two of Maryland's major newspapers," Ehrlich writes. "This monopoly moves in lock step to raise taxes, increase spending, hurt small businesses and pander to liberal special interests. As we saw in the past, dissent is not allowed and debate is squashed."

The letter is silent on whether Ehrlich plans to seek a rematch with O'Malley in 2010. It asks for contributions of $50, $100 or $250 so that he can continue to "go on the offensive and wage the struggle needed to stop the Annapolis bosses and their far left agenda."

Ehrlich's fundraising efforts last year yielded almost $116,000, a relatively modest take.

"This looks like a guy who's floundering around, trying to find his relevancy," said David Paulson, a spokesman for the Maryland Democratic Party.

Ehrlich, who hosts a weekly radio show in Baltimore with his wife, is remaining visible in other ways as well. He is billed, for example, as the "special guest" at the annual Lincoln/Reagan dinner early next month by the St. Mary's County Republican Party.

-- John Wagner

Dwyer Creates a Stir at Hearing

Del. Donald H. Dwyer Jr. (R-Anne Arundel) has long been one of the General Assembly's most conservative voices on social issues. Last week he made a dramatic pronouncement to a crowd of about 80 Latino workers gathered at a hearing before the House Judiciary Committee: He said that anyone not in the country legally should leave the room because he had alerted federal immigration authorities.

Committee Chairman Joseph F. Vallario Jr. (D-Prince George's) quickly told the crowd that "no one" needed to leave the room. "Everyone will be heard on this issue," he said.


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