Top-Level Departures Continue

Justice Official Who Oversees Cases On Corruption, Fraud Is Quitting

Alice S. Fisher led Justice Department initiatives that included a crackdown on corporate bribes and a new effort against international organized crime.
Alice S. Fisher led Justice Department initiatives that included a crackdown on corporate bribes and a new effort against international organized crime. (2006 Photo By Chris Greenberg -- Associated Press)
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Thursday, May 1, 2008

Alice S. Fisher, chief of the Justice Department's criminal division, said yesterday that she will leave government service at the end of the month after nearly three years overseeing major public corruption and corporate fraud cases.

Her departure leaves the Justice Department even more short-staffed. Fisher is one of only four remaining division chiefs who have navigated the Senate confirmation process.

Among the ongoing investigations Fisher has been overseeing are cases involving members of Congress and executives at mortgage companies caught up in the credit debacle. Her deputy, Barry M. Sabin, a former federal prosecutor in Miami, is serving in an acting capacity, and her chief of staff left for private practice earlier this year.

Justice Department officials said they are not ready to announce who will replace Fisher, who previously worked for several years at the law firm Latham & Watkins.

Fisher's signature initiatives include a crackdown on corporate bribes and a new strategy to attack international organized crime. She developed a reputation as a tough-minded leader who marshaled resources and helped reenergize units that prosecute white-collar malfeasance and public-integrity offenses.

"She will leave a void that will be tough to fill," said Andrew C. Lourie, a former top aide to Fisher who is a defense lawyer in Washington.

-- Carrie Johnson


© 2008 The Washington Post Company

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