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700 Reasons Why Andy Warhol Remains Famous

A 1986 self-portrait, ordinarily housed at the Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh, is among the items to be displayed at Ohio State University. The exhibit includes paintings, photos and films by and about the pop art figure, who died in 1987.
A 1986 self-portrait, ordinarily housed at the Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh, is among the items to be displayed at Ohio State University. The exhibit includes paintings, photos and films by and about the pop art figure, who died in 1987. (Andy Warhol Foundation For The Visual Arts)
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Sunday, September 7, 2008

WHAT:"Andy Warhol: Other Voices, Other Rooms" at the Wexner Center for the Arts at Ohio State University in Columbus.

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WHEN: Sept. 13-Feb. 15.

HOW MUCH: $8. Free the first Sunday of the month and every Thursday from 4 to 8 p.m.

WHY GO: Pop art icon Andy Warhol once said, "In the future, everyone will be world-famous for 15 minutes," and he helped prove it. Best known for his paintings of soup cans and portraits of such celebrities as Marilyn Monroe and Elizabeth Taylor, Warhol was also a prolific filmmaker, whose works included movies that experimented with voyeurism.

The multimedia exhibit, organized by the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam and the Moderna Museet in Stockholm, makes its sole U.S. appearance at the Wexner. The show's subtitle refers to a novel by Truman Capote, whom the artist obsessively watched before the two became friends.

Warhol takes over the Wexner: The 700-plus works culled from around the world are displayed in all of the galleries, in the lobby and even along a long ramp. The exhibit includes paintings, photographs, "Mao" and "Cow" wallpaper, copies of Warhol's magazine Interview, record covers and other archival materials. In addition, visitors can watch Warhol, or at least some of his films, including one of a man simply sleeping. (Yawn.) "Warhol's work is a mirror of us, our lives and our world," says exhibit curator Eva Meyer-Hermann.

DON'T MISS . . . "Henry Geldzahler," an unscripted film of the legendary Metropolitan Museum of Art curator who tries to stay composed and professional as he sits in front of a movie camera for 99 minutes without any direction. By the end of the film, Geldzahler has "sunk down into himself, even poking at his nose," Meyer-Hermann says, becoming a "perfectly ordinary person." . . . "Silver Clouds," the helium-filled, metallic-colored balloons that float freely in a gallery. . . . In the "Filmscape" section, large screens play 19 Warhol films in loops, including the 1966 "Chelsea Girls," which features unscripted interactions between Warhol's acquaintances. In "TV -Scape," dozens of screens air cable TV episodes that Warhol created between 1979 and 1987. (The artist died in 1987.)

EXTRAS: On Oct. 3, the Weigel Auditorium (1866 College Rd., adjacent to the Wexner, 614-292-3535; $15, includes exhibit admission) will host "Remembering Andy: A Conversation With John Waters and Vincent Fremont," in which the "Hairspray" director and the vice president of Andy Warhol Enterprises discuss the artist's contributions to cinema and American culture. . . . Inspired by Warhol's "Self-Portrait in Drag," the Wexner celebrates Drag Day on Oct. 5. The event (free with exhibit admission) includes a performance by local drag queens and a supply of wigs and makeup, so that visitors can get dolled up, too. . . . In honor of what would have been Warhol's 80th birthday, the Wexner has organized an international symposium, "Andy Warhol: Outer and Inner Dichotomies." Critics, artists and curators will participate in panels on Warhol's influence on contemporary culture. The Nov. 14-15 event is free with admission.

EATS: In the Wexner lobby, Cam's On Campus offers casual breakfast and lunch options, including smoothies, soups, wraps, sandwiches and rice bowls ($2-$9). The eclectic Bar of Modern Art (583 E. Broad St., 614-233-3000) has seven bars, a nightclub, an art gallery and a restaurant, the Loft at BoMa, all housed in a former church. Try the house specialty, Peanut Butter & Jelly (Hudson Valley foie gras, roasted cashew butter, Grand Marnier marmalade and honey infused with black pepper; $13), or sustainable salmon served with crab wontons, a saute of wild mushrooms and blood orange soy butter ($24). Finish with Chocolate Passion, a fudge cake topped with layers of passion fruit and chocolate mousse ($7).

SLEEPS: The upscale Blackwell Hotel and Conference Center (2110 Tuttle Park Pl., 866-247-4003, http://www.theblackwell.com), on the Ohio State campus and within walking distance of the Wexner, offers rooms with laptop computers, a pillow menu and airport shuttle service. Its Other Voices, Other Rooms Warhol Package includes one-night accommodations for two, a pair of exhibit tickets, breakfast, valet parking and turndown service with pop-art-inspired gifts, for $179. In downtown's hip Arena District, the Lofts (55 E. Nationwide Blvd., 614-461-2663, http://www.55lofts.com) is a sleek, modern hotel tucked into a 19th-century building. Rooms feature exposed wood and steel beams, floor-to-ceiling windows and plush Italian linens. Its Andy Warhol Experience Package includes a one-night stay for two, valet parking, two tickets to the exhibit and breakfast for two at Max & Erma's. Rate is $195.

INFO: Wexner Center for the Arts at Ohio State University, 1871 N. High St., Columbus, 614-292-0330, http://www.wexarts.org.

-- Kristin Harrison


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