Price, Scarcity of Salt Pinching City Coffers

Doug Brunk, an official in Butler Township, Ohio, examines a stockpile of road salt, which officials say could be in shorter supply this winter.
Doug Brunk, an official in Butler Township, Ohio, examines a stockpile of road salt, which officials say could be in shorter supply this winter. (By Chris Stewart -- Dayton Daily News Via Associated Press)
By Charles Wilson
Associated Press
Sunday, September 28, 2008

INDIANAPOLIS -- A shortage of road salt and skyrocketing salt prices could mean slippery roads this winter in communities across the nation, as officials struggle to keep pavement clear of snow and ice without breaking their budgets.

Heavy snow last year heightened demand for salt, and now many towns cannot find enough of it. The shortage could force cities to salt fewer roads, while other communities are abandoning road salt for less-expensive but also less-effective sand or sand-salt blends.

"The driving public may be the ones who suffer on this," said Robert Young, highway superintendent for northwestern Indiana's LaPorte County, which has 20,000 tons of salt on hand -- only half as much as needed to last a normal winter. Because of the shortage, three companies refused to bid on the county's request for more.

Prices have also tripled from a year ago. The salt industry says the increased demand and higher fuel costs are to blame.

"That explanation doesn't wash," said Tom Barwin, city manager in the Chicago suburb of Oak Park, Ill., one of several officials who have asked the Illinois attorney general to investigate the price increases. (The office declined, saying it doesn't have jurisdiction.)

The United States used a near-record 20.3 million tons of road salt last year, largely because areas from the Northeast to the Midwest had heavier-than-average snowfall. Vermont, New Hampshire and other areas set records.

The harsh winter left salt storage barns virtually empty. Communities that needed additional salt late in the season had trouble finding it because supplier stockpiles had also been depleted, according to Dick Hanneman, president of the Salt Institute, a trade group.

This year, many states requested bids early, Hanneman said, and salt orders grew significantly. Five states increased their orders by 2 million tons over last year.

Suppliers quickly realized that at that pace, they would not have enough salt to bid on other contracts, he said.

The rising cost of gasoline and diesel compounded the situation, Hanneman said. Road salt -- which, unlike table salt, is sold in large crystals -- is transported by barge and truck from mines in Kansas, Louisiana and Texas. Some is shipped from as far away as Chile in South America.


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