Government Launches Nursing Home Rating System

Network News

X Profile
View More Activity
By Amanda Gardner
HealthDay Reporter
Thursday, December 18, 2008; 12:00 AM

THURSDAY, Dec. 18 (HealthDay News) -- The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services unveiled an updated Web site Thursday intended to make choosing a nursing home easier for elderly Americans and their families.

The updated Nursing Home Compare site uses a five-star rating system, similar to that used for hotels and motels, to rank institutions nationwide.

"The old site had a lot of information, but the information wasn't necessarily terribly usable by the average consumer. You knew if the facility was above or below the state average, but you didn't know what that meant," said Charles Phillips, a professor of health policy and management at Texas A&M Health Science Center School of Rural Public Health, in College Station. "What you have with the five-star system is a very well-thought-out way of summarizing all of that information that was available on the earlier site with new information. … This allows you to do a much more direct comparison in a user-friendly way."

Roughly 10 percent of the facilities have five stars and roughly 20 percent have one star, said Phillips, who served on the advisory panel that developed the rating system.

Geriatric experts, however, were concerned the site might not reflect patients' and families' true concerns.

"My reaction [to the site] is I have never been asked any of these questions because people assume good medical care, maybe incorrectly," said Debra Greenberg, a senior social worker in the division of geriatrics instruction at Montefiore Medical Center and Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York City. "There are other quality-of-life issues they are very concerned about -- the atmosphere, cleanliness, ratio of nursing professionals, the ability to go visit. None of that is reflected in what gives this a five-star rating."

Dr. Laurie Jacobs, director of the Resnick Gerontology Center, also at Montefiore Medical Center and Albert Einstein College of Medicine, said that "the positive about this is they are finally bringing to the public a rating of medical care that had been a mystery before, based on surveys, but it's limited to that and has none of the other information that families also desperately want when they want to decide on a facility."

Meanwhile, the National Citizens' Coalition for Nursing Home Reform issued a statement saying it is "fully aware of the shortcomings of the rating system," but it would still support it as an important educational tool.

But the American Association of Homes and Services for the Aging was more critical of the new effort.

"The five-star rating system is a great idea prematurely implemented. We support a consumer-friendly nursing home rating system based on reliable quality information that the public can understand. But what is being launched tomorrow is poorly planned, prematurely implemented and ham-handedly rolled out," Larry Minnix, president and CEO of the association, said in a statement.

The importance of comprehensive, up-to-date information on the nation's 16,000 nursing homes is indisputable.

U.S. Census figures project that the number of Americans age 65 or older will double by 2030 and that two-thirds of today's 65-year-olds will require some period of long-term care later in their lives.


CONTINUED     1        >


HealthDay
© 2008 Scout News LLC. All rights reserved.

Network News

X My Profile
View More Activity