Your Turn: Reader Reaction to Stories About Family Finances and Multilevel Marketing Plans

Sunday, August 2, 2009

Excerpts from e-mails, online postings and chat comments:

Reaction to the story "Family Finances" in the July 19 issue

Eileen Johnson of Salisbury, Md., e-mails:

A moving, meaningful article about a teen father's struggle to keep his family fed and together ["Father Love," July 5] was followed this week by a story by a morally challenged, money-obsessed father who makes almost no reference to his children (outside their costs), while implying that he's aware of the absurdity of a money-driven life. Mr. Rosenfeld claims to live a modest life, but most of us truly in the middle or bottom middle know that a six-figure salary is not a struggle, no matter what your perceived "needs."

dingus5 wrote online:

Jim and Emmet Rosenfeld seem to be comfortable, both with each other and in their own skin. It's good that they both found careers in which they excel and can be fulfilled. I didn't sense any jealousy or rivalry. What a great article.

zespectre wrote online:

Oh, please. When one of these guys has to choose between gas to get to work and dinner on the table for his kids, then it might be time to talk about the "poor" brother.

Reaction to the story "Point of Sale" in the July 19 issue

heatherdc1980 wrote online:

God, this makes me so sad. For all the people who get the Bentley, there are probably 100 who lose the $500 they probably couldn't afford to part with. Multilevel marketing plans are all schemes.

mrison wrote online:

Think about it, everyone starts from the same vantage point with the same product or service, marketing and training material. So, it comes down to the individual, who only needs to add a few skill sets to the recipe to create success. But before that, they need to define their "why." The "why" needs to be strong enough to pull them through the slow times, the "growth times." If the "why" is about the money, people will quit when it doesn't show up immediately. And it is these folks that say it's a scam.

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