Correction to This Article
The article on Washington Redskins tickets contained an incorrect Web address for a ticket reseller's site; the correct address is www.ascticket.com. The article also misspelled the last name of Ticket Network chief executive Don Vaccaro.
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Washington Redskins Sold Brokers Tickets Despite Wait List

Nov. 3, 2008 FedEx Field For the Steelers game last season, the Redskins sold at least 443 tickets directly to a ticket broker, contributing to a sea of Pittsburgh fans. The Redskins sold 5,000 tickets to the same broker over the past two seasons, but team officials said the amount sold to the broker was insignificant.
Nov. 3, 2008 FedEx Field For the Steelers game last season, the Redskins sold at least 443 tickets directly to a ticket broker, contributing to a sea of Pittsburgh fans. The Redskins sold 5,000 tickets to the same broker over the past two seasons, but team officials said the amount sold to the broker was insignificant. (By John Mcdonnell -- The Washington Post)
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Premium seats also help teams compete with scalpers by offering fans with money alternatives when tickets become scarce and high-priced. But the higher prices make them harder to sell for routine games.

And FedEx Field, after seating expansions by Snyder, has among the most premium seats and suites in the league. There are 20,000 premium seats and 243 suites at FedEx.

Many of the people who end up buying premium seats signed up on the waiting list to purchase general admission tickets.

"I was trying to get one of the regular seats, in the regular part of the stadium," said Alonzo Webb, a 60-year-old investigator for the Department of Homeland Security. "They said that you had to go on a waiting list of thousands of people. However, they had seats available in the club section. There was no waiting list."

Ticket Broker's Tale

The story of one ticket broker shows how employees of the Redskins ticket office bundled club seats with general admission to make sales.

ASC owner Jeff Greenberg said a Redskins official first reached out to him in 2007 because sales agents were having trouble selling premium-priced club seats, with many fans declining to renew 10-year contracts signed when the stadium opened in 1997.

Greenberg, 42, who has been a ticket broker for 17 years, works out of a storefront in a building he owns in Gaithersburg. The company, which occupies two floors and has 12 employees, sells tickets to concerts, shows and sports events in almost every major venue in the United States.

Constantly switching between his cellphone and land lines, he sits before three computer screens, listing every ticket he buys or sells.

The 2007 arrangement that Greenberg had with the Redskins covered 1,360 individual tickets that he bought for about $60,000, team records show. Most of them were general admission tickets -- 710 in the upper deck and 366 in the lower bowl.

In 2008, ASC bought 217 season tickets (for 10 games) and 2,000 seats to individual games during the season. About half of those seats were in the lower bowl, with most in sections 101 to 142. About 40 percent of the seats were premium, and the rest were in the upper deck.

Greenberg said the contracts required him to buy the premium seats for two years in exchange for being allowed to buy the 169 lower bowl season tickets "in perpetuity."

The ticket sales appear in printouts of an account with ASC's address in Gaithersburg, and the account is listed to Dennis Wipprecht, an employee of ASC. The Redskins account representative is listed as Jason Friedman, vice president for premium seating in the Redskins ticket office.


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